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2017 Ivan Allen Morning Panel

– Well good morning again and welcome My name is Rafael Bras, and on behalf of Georgia Tech, we would like to thank you for joining us here today for the Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage Symposium The annual symposium was established to honor alumnus and former Atlanta mayor, Ivan Allen Jr The symposium is so important to Georgia Tech because it brings together, us together to celebrate and highlight examples of transformative work, that is addressing some of the most difficult issues facing our nation and the world But beyond celebration, the symposium also allows us a time to reflect and consider the grand challenges that still face our neighbors both near and far, and in here now and in years to come Awarded for the first time on March 2011, the Ivan Allen Jr Prize for Social Courage is made possible by the general support of the Wilbur and Hilda Glenn Family Foundation, and recognizes those around the world who by standing up for clear moral principles in the social arena have positively affected to the public discourse We thank members of the Allen family and the Ivan Allen Advisory Board for the commitment on joining us today Mayor Allen was an insightful, courageous, and innovative leader who envisioned a truly transformative path for the city of Atlanta His leadership, both in business and community engagement, forever changed the city’s economic and civic landscape Transformative change, innovation, commitment and courage, those are the key issues about this prize, the key descriptors of this prize These attributes are really and truly the legacy of the Ivan Allen Jr., of Ivan Allen Jr., and they are the motivators for Dean Jacqueline Royster and the faculty staff and students in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts I’d like to recognize Dean Royster, who is here today Dean Royster, can you stand? (all applauding) Thank you, Jackie, Dean Royster, and thank you to all the faculty for your hard work in putting this together Ivan Allen Jr.’s work and commitment were truly extraordinary And this prize that bears his name underscores Georgia Tech’s mission to improve the human condition by recognizing those around the world, who, like Mayor Allen, have made a positive difference by standing up for moral principle at the risk of their career and livelihoods, and even their lives Before I go forward, I know that there’s at least one previous winner of this award, Dr. Foege Could you please stand? (all applauding) Am I missing anybody? Previous awardee? Thank you very much for being here, Dr. Foege We’re gonna take a few minutes now to remember the work of Ivan Allen Jr (uplifting music) – When Ivan Allen served as Atlanta’s 52nd mayor, he demonstrated transformational and visionary leadership by partnering with Dr. Martin Luther King on key civil rights issues of the day, and Atlanta is radically different from other cities because of his exceptional leadership – [Announcer] Ivan Allen Jr. was a visionary, a man of action When he was inaugurated as mayor of Atlanta in 1962, he faced a city and economic malaise, and deeply divided by racial segregation But Allen was ready for the challenge His Six Point Forward Atlanta plan encompassed urban renewal, new infrastructure, including an expressway system and plans for public transportation, the building of a civic auditorium, a Major League sport stadium, and a commitment to keeping open Atlanta schools through racial discord – [Andrew] The major contribution I think of Ivan Allen was that he dreamed of a city of four million people,

but we didn’t have but 400,000 folk in the entire region – [Announcer] Mayor Allen succeeded on all points of his plan during eight years in office, creating the greatest economic surge in the city’s history, bringing in Braves, Hawks, and Falcons, a vibrant new arts and cultural scene, and creating the beginning of a unified new south (upbeat 60s music) As he listened daily to the concerns of African Americans, what began as a businessman strategy for economic growth grew into a deep moral conviction that the public accommodation for African Americans was the right thing, and his advocacy grew stronger – [Jimmy] It’s hard for anyone outside of the south to understand the depth of feeling that existed then, the prejudices that swept our schools, our churches, that justify this discrimination There were a very few courageous people that broke that shell that we had built around ourselves One of them was Ivan Allen – [Sam] Ivan Allen displayed courage and confronted his adversaries But he also challenged his peers, and was willing to incur their scorn and anger where social justice was at stake – The challenge to complete the elimination of discrimination from all public accommodations punishes us with a great opportunity to– – [Announcer] In 1963, at the behest of President John F. Kennedy, Mayor Allen testified before Congress on behalf of what became the Civil Rights Act of 1964 He was the only prominent white southern leader to do so – There was a time when vast numbers of people hated him intensely, because of his stand on integration So much so that the Allen family had police protection in their home for a good period of time And these feelings were not limited to the raw fringes of society They were present at all social levels – [Announcer] Mayor Allen’s partnerships with Martin Luther King Junior and other African Americans showed that barriers were falling, and a long overdue transformation was close enough to touch – [Kasim] On issue after issue, he showed sound judgment and a commitment to the future – He was a leader while he was a student here at Georgia Tech, and went on to be a leader in everything he did throughout his career Now half a century later, his life is a beacon of light for those of us following in his footsteps It’s our goal here at Georgia Tech to take the legacy of Ivan Allen Jr., and pass it on to the next generation – [Jimmy] The name Ivan Allen was a beacon light for breaking through the darkness And I’m personally grateful to him – [Announcer] It’s the legacy of Ivan Allen Jr., the man whose values infuse the way we teach, and the way we learn – The character and integrity revealed in acts of social courage are not qualities that can be simply switched on when needed They have to be built and practiced day by day, week by week, and year by year To build a world of promise, and avoid a world of peril, we’re going to have to cooperate with each other Ivan Allen Jr. showed us the way (all applauding) – Well that’s certainly quite a life to emulate But today, we certainly have the opportunity to honor a couple that really and truly have made a difference Today we will be honoring President Jimmy Carter, and former First Lady, Rosalynn Carter At Georgia Tech, we proudly call President Carter one of our own, and today we celebrate what is now more than half a century of the Carter’s service, advocacy and resolve to promote democracy, protect human rights, and prevent disease around the world Their partnership is truly inspirational We welcome members of the Carter family who are here today We are joined by I believe by two of the Carter’s grandsons including Josh Carter, who I believe is here with his wife Sarah Jane, and former state senator Jason Carter, who is participating in the first panel this morning From these two perspectives, we must engage and partner with leaders whose experience, courage and actions are transforming our world by creating and sustaining social change Today we honor and celebrate the Carters’ exemplary leadership May their actions serve as beacons of courage to us all Again, I thank you for being here today

Now it is my pleasure to introduce the moderator of this morning first panel, Mr. John Pruitt A mainstay of Atlanta, Pruitt retired from Channel 2 Action News in 2010, after 47 years on Atlanta’s television Throughout this historic career, Pruitt covered major civil rights stories, Jimmy Carter’s gubernatorial and presidential campaigns, the funeral of Dr. Martin Luther King, the inaugurations of Presidents Carter and Clinton, and attacks on the US Marine barracks in Lebanon in 1983, and the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 He is a 10-time Emmy winner, among other awards, and is a member of the Atlanta Press Club Hall of Fame Please join me in welcoming Mr. John Pruitt (all applauding) – Thank you Thank you – Thank you very much Well these are not great times for journalists, even retired journalists but– (crowd laughing) I hope we have a friendly crowd here today I am extremely fortunate to have been a reporter, starting in 1964 and to have actually covered Ivan Allen Jr I thought the video did a remarkable job of profiling his career, but as a young reporter covering this man, I just want to add my two cents’ worth It’s important to remember that Ivan Allen Jr. came from a background of segregation, and to be elected to public office in the 60s in the south, you almost had to speak in terms of being a segregationist He dramatically changed when he took office It was 180 degrees And this is an award for social service, for courage And I’ve never seen a public official display the courage that Ivan Allen Jr. did, in going to Washington and testifying for the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and act of remarkable political courage, to do the right thing, not the politically-expedient thing While the fire hoses and police dogs were in the streets of Birmingham, Atlanta had a mayor who ushered us into the era that we now all enjoy But it wasn’t just political courage This man had physical courage There was a day in the late 60s when there was a riot in the Summerhill community Crowds were running, breaking windows, the police were in there trying to control the crowd Ivan Allen went into that crowd with a bullhorn, climbed up on a police car, tried to calm the crowd Unfortunately, it didn’t work The crowd approached the police car, began rocking it, and Ivan Allen was knocked off of that police car But the physical courage to put himself in harm’s way to protect his city and the people of the city is something that has stayed with me ever since So journalists are supposed to be objective When it comes to Ivan Allen Jr., I am not This was a great man, and I am privileged to be part of this today I was also very privileged to have covered our honorees from a long time back My first connection with the Carters was 1970 A terrific governor’s race, it was one of the most exciting, colorful races that I think Georgia’s ever had It was a race that Jimmy Carter won, but I was privileged to have been on the campaign trail almost every day, much of that time with Jimmy Carter and Rosalynn Carter And then I was lucky enough to have this governor run for the White House, and I covered the campaign, got to take some road trips, New Hampshire, Florida, Pennsylvania Went to the White House several times to cover him as President But the most remarkable thing I think is what’s happened since then, the post-presidency, when Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter have launched the Carter Presidential Center and gone around the world, curing diseases, monitoring elections, waging peace, as The Carter Center likes to say, that’s a pretty good term for it They’re remarkable people, remarkable individuals, and they keep on going and it’s just amazing So it’s a thrill to be able to honor them today and to be a part of that Now, enough from me We have six people here who are going to be talking about the Carters, and their many contributions to our country and to the world, and they view it all from different perspectives

I’m going to introduce them now, there are six panelists, I’ll introduce them one at a time And as I introduce the panel, would you please come up and take your seats? The first panelist is Jason Carter, the Honorable Jason Carter, should I say? Jason is a former state senator, former candidate for governor He of course is the grandson of Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter He is a trust, he’s the head of the Board of Trustees, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of The Carter Center, and a partner with the law firm of Bondurant, Mixson and Elmore So we’ll be talking to Jason about his very personal connection with his grandparents Our next panelist, Ambassador Mary Ann Peters, who is chief executive officer of The Carter Center She spent almost 30 years in the foreign service, including a tour as ambassador to Bangladesh She will be talking about the humanitarian initiatives of The Carter Center, including Rosalynn Carter’s various mental health initiatives Our next panelist is Dr. MaryAnne Borrelli She is professor of government at Connecticut College She is an expert on gender and politics She’s written a couple of books, “The Politics of the President’s Wife” and “The President’s Cabinet: Gender, Power and Representation” Now the middle seat’s for me, so the next three panelists will sit on the end (chuckles) Johnathan T.M. Reckford is chief executive officer for Habitat for Humanity International And he could certainly tell us about the global impact of this organization, particularly the Carter Work Project and the impact of having a President and a First Lady who put on a carpenter’s apron and pick up a hammer and actually build these homes around the world Lisa A. Gordon is president and chief executive officer of Atlanta Habitat for Humanity She of course will be talking to us about the local impact of Habitat in the Metro area, and the Carters’ role in that And finally a man who certainly needs no introduction, Ambassador Andrew Young He’s played such a key role in so many major moments in our city’s life, from the civil rights struggle, eight years as mayor of Atlanta, to bringing the Olympics to Atlanta He played a vital role in getting Jimmy Carter elected President And he’s here to do what he does best, to give his perspective on all that will be discussed and to lead us in the right way when we step off and run out of bounds But hopefully we will not be doing that (crowd laughing) So I’m gonna move to the center seat, and we’re gonna ask each of these six panelists to give us a brief introductory statement, and that will be followed by questions from me and hopefully we’ll have time for questions from the audience So Jason, we’ll begin with you – Thank you John and my take on this is as a, perhaps the beginning, perhaps the end, but my grandparents’ story begins in Plains, Georgia And I was just talking to President Carter and others about south Georgia, but one of the things about my grandparents’ partnership that I think it is important to remember is that they both started in this tiny little town of 600 people And it still has 600 people, and they still live there And their experience as a couple, the human connection that they feel, the understanding that when they walk into a tiny little village in Mali that some people might think is the middle of nowhere and has nothing to offer, they see it as 600 people who might go on to change the world And so this background of Plains, Georgia is so fundamental to them as to, it’s almost impossible I think to overstate it This is when they got married, almost 71 years ago They celebrated their 70th anniversary the other year now– (crowd applauding) As you know, my grandmother’s experience, and as Ambassador Peters will talk, a 70 year marriage is indicative of, there’s almost no one who has ever lived, who’s had a 70 year marriage, and didn’t have a happy, full, incredible life And the other prizes, the other awards, the other things that have evidenced that my grandparents’ life, I think nothing speaks more to their happiness and faith and excitement with the world than their 70 year marriage And my grandfather would say that it’s a testament to his experience in conflict resolution (crowd laughing) And my grandmother would say that it’s testament to her expertise in mental health (crowd laughing) But the experiences that they’ve had from that tiny town, they’ve of course became President of the United States, and the partnership that many people will talk about,

the piece of it that I wanted to highlight is that so much of the world, whether it’s politics, whether it’s peacemaking, whether it’s business, it’s really about human connection And even if you’re talking about the greatest leaders in the world talking to each other, bringing people together, understanding how it works, it’s really a story of human connection And you know, this of course is a famous picture of my grandparents, Ambassador Young, is at Ebenezer Baptist Church, but those types of human connections that they shared together, the fundamental human connection in their life was the one that they shared together And that’s why this award that’s given to the partnership is such a remarkable one This picture, to me, just it looks like it could be any couple in love, you know? But this actually was taken in the Middle East in 1978 And as they were getting ready to truly tackle this conflict of literally biblical proportions, right? The Egyptians and the Israelis fought essentially from the time of Exodus, or Genesis, until 1978 And the process of addressing that became a process that they really tackled in many ways together as an exercise in human connection This is the presidential diary of Jimmy Carter from February 4, 1978, and it just illustrates I think the way that you build these human connections that ultimately become the foundations for peace and so this, you can’t see it very well, but you know, the President and First Lady hosted a luncheon for US and Egyptian officials at Camp David, and the President and the First Lady escorted President and Mrs Sadat on a walking tour of Camp David, and the relationship that they built together was a remarkable one Then this says the President the First Lady, accompanied by President and Mrs. Sadat, watched the movie Star Wars (crowd laughing) More just evidence of regular people, who were that, at the same time sort of recognizing their common humanity but, you know, they were in the process of changing the world as an aside And they loved it, by the way And I’ll also point out that my grandfather would probably tell you that his best friend ever was a muslim, and is referenced in this picture here And in his workshop, he’s got a picture of one other person, and it’s Anwar Sadat The Carter Center’s work in observing elections, in bringing democracy, the two of them together and their connection just highlights so much of what The Carter Center’s work is, which is the type of human connection that’s reflected there This is administering a treatment of river blindness medicine that prevents one of the leading forms of preventable blindness in the world, and again, they do together over and over and over again This is in Ghana But, this looks like a scrapbook of a marriage that’s just remarkable to me And this last picture of them is one that, this is them in the Sudanese elections in 2011 But to me, this one, I took this one, this year at New Years, and that’s my son Thomas on the right, and my son Henry on the left, and this is the midnight fireworks at the place where we were staying and the way that they live their lives and the way that they treat their family and the partnership that they have, again, putting aside all of the incredible things that they’ve done for the world is just an incredible example to me, and I think to so many others But this is just a family shot, and the two of them still, you know, first of all stay up ’til midnight, and they’re 93 years old ’cause they want to see the fireworks (crowd laughing) But you know, the love that they have for each other and for their great-grandchildren who are there in this picture just seemed to me to be a remarkable celebration for them And so for my family to the organizers and obviously, Ivan Allen has been an important part of my family’s life There’s an Ivan Allen pavilion at The Carter Center to show just how deeply that goes, but we just wanted to say thank you for recognizing their partnership Thank you (crowd applauding) – I just had a quick followup question Was there a moment as a young person that you said, “I want to be like them, “I want to go into public service”? Or was, did they take you aside and encourage you to do that? Was it osmosis? What provoked that interest on your part? – You know, it’s, I’m not gonna answer your question,

but I’m gonna answer a different question (Jason laughs) – Gotta follow up – Well now, I mean, I guess there’s not really a moment where I said I’m gonna run for office I mean, I talked to them about it, I asked them about it, and you know, when I asked for their advice, they would often of course give it You know, “Jason, I think you should do it”, or you know, “Running for office, whether you win or lose, “is one of the greatest experiences that you’ll have.” And so there was that idea, and of course, just having, I guess to use your word osmosis, having observed a couple important lessons, number one, that you can achieve sort of the highest political office without compromising your values, without losing track of who you are, without undermining your marriage, right? I mean, some of those things when you look out at the world of politics and the history of politicians, it’s not a very pleasant one sometimes And to have an example in my family of someone who did all of that was really important, but the moment where I felt the closest to them in terms of running for office and being in public life is I was running for the state senate My youngest child was 18 months old, and you know, so we had a three year old and an 18 month old, and you know, it was just really hard on the family When you’re running for an office like state senate, you gotta be at every single neighborhood meeting, you’ve gotta do these things, and it was just grinding and it was just wearing on me, and me and my wife both were having such a hard time just managing our time, and our lives, and feeling like, “Oh, if I miss that event, “that’s gonna be the two votes that I would have had”, and I went and I sat with my grandparents, just the four of us, and I said, they said, “How’s it going?” I said, “You know, I’m really tired.” And my grandmother said, “Oh yeah, we always hated it.” (crowd laughing) And I thought, “I’m so glad that you guys also thought “it was so hard, because just”, but there’s not that many people who’ve gone through it, and to have them, who’ve been so successful talk about how hard it is, to sort of live your life in that human way while you’re going through it, it was a perfect moment for me and it’s one I’ll always remember but, thank you – Let’s turn to Mary Ann Peters Ambassador, you’ve worked very closely with the Carters, obviously, as we see you over at The Carter Center Your thoughts and perspectives on this remarkable relationship? – Well thank you John Jason of course is in a much better position than I am to speak to the long partnership between President and Mrs Carter but I have been at The Carter Center for two and a half years now, and I’ve seen nothing but an incredible partnership And by the way, Jason and I chose some of the same photos, not all of the same ones, and I think that’s because the photos illustrate so well the partnership that we’re talking about The Carter Center was founded by President and Mrs. Carter in 1982, and together, they’ve led The Center for nearly 35 years Both of our founders are life members of The Carter Center Board of Trustees And, which Jason by the way now chairs And Jason and I have a monthly meeting with both President and Mrs. Carter, so it’s really true that they are the founders, and they have of course not only shaped the programs of The Center, but the values that guide The Center as well Just a couple of words about The Carter Center I thought perhaps we could talk a little more later about the programs What I’d like to do right now is talk about the, the mission principles that guide The Center Now, The Carter Center’s motto is, “Waging Peace, Fighting Disease, Building Hope” We’ve worked in more than 80 countries, and at any given moment, you’ll find The Carter Center actively working in about half that number of countries Our health programs, again, as I think you know, are focused largely on eliminating or eradicating neglected tropical diseases in Africa and Latin America, and our peace programs focus on democracy, on human rights, and on conflict resolution But the character of The Center, this really incredible institution that I’m privileged to be a part of is based more on how we do things and why than on what we do And the how and the why are the legacy of President and Mrs. Carter On our website, you’ll find five mission principles The first is that The Center emphasizes action and measurable results The second is that we actively seek to avoid duplicating the effective efforts of others And I really don’t know of any other organization that is quite as explicit and deliberate about that mission of finding a niche The third principle is that because we are going to be doing things no one else really wants to do like

seeking to eradicate Guinea-worm, we’re going to be dealing with difficult problems in difficult places And therefore, and I think this is really a stunning part of The Carter Center’s ethos, failure is an acceptable risk How many organizations, especially those that depend on money from other people actually say that failure is an acceptable risk? But of course, we all know from our own experience that an occasional failure is the price of the innovation that fuels achievement The fourth principle, and don’t chuckle, is that The Carter Center is non-partisan As President Carter said once again this morning, and he says it often, there are 22 voters in The Carter Center extended family, as far as he knows, they all vote democratic and he and Mrs. Carter of course certainly do, but our programs are based on values; Compassion, respect for human dignity, belief in democracy, that President and Mrs. Carter model and that I believe, and I know they believe, are shared by the vast majority of Americans across our political spectrum And the final principle, the one that really I think sets The Carter Center apart is, and I’ll read this one, The Center believes that people can improve their own lives when provided with the necessary skills, knowledge, and access to resources And I’ve heard both President and Mrs. Carter say time and again, that people in these villages, these villages that, as Jason said, remind them of Plains, those people are just as intelligent as they are, their family values are just as strong as theirs, their hopes for their children are just as shining as theirs And this essential respect is something that you just can’t counterfeit It’s about the core value of human dignity, and I think it’s the most important value that we have motivating The Carter Center I’ll just say one thing at this point about our programs And, that is to mention Mrs Carter’s special work One of my colleagues at The Center, Phil Wise, who some of you may know, likes to say that, “The Carters are equal partners in everything except “the mental health program, “which Mrs. Carter leads on her own”, and according to Phil, “Won’t let President Carter have much to do with.” And it’s certainly true that Mrs. Carter has unique expertise on mental health issues, which have been her focus since 1970 And one of the slides that’s been scrolling shows Mrs. Carter testifying in 2007 before a House Subcommittee in favor of parity, that is the requirement that we now enjoy for insurance companies to pay for treatment for mental illnesses on a par with what they cover for physical illnesses And of course President Carter himself has deeper expertise in say, conflict resolution than Mrs. Carter does, although again, she’s been part of those efforts since Camp David and continuing through The Carter Center’s mediation efforts And from what I have seen, partnership for them means acting together when that makes sense, and taking complimentary roles when that achieves a better outcome So I think I’ll end there, and hope that we can talk a little more about The Carter Center’s programs, embodying these values as the discussion proceeds – Okay, I’m sure we’re gonna have some questions for you, and we’ll get into Q and A Very good (crowd applauding) Well there’s been a lot of talk about the role of First Ladies in the past four weeks, and Dr. MaryAnne Borrelli is an expert in that She is, as I told you earlier, has written two books on First Ladies, and gender and presidential cabinets So, would you say that the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter union in the White House is the ideal to be achieved? I mean, was it, did it set the tone that you think other First Ladies and Chief Executives should follow? – I think one of the most– – Am I leading you too much here? (John laughs) – No But my five minutes Let me answer that question as I go along – Okay – Thank you So, there we go This is my chance to kind of give you a little bit about Rosalynn Carter, and it’s just such a pleasure to be here So I’ll start by reminding you of what she brought to the White House, especially, it’s not advancing There we go So, she entered the White House with the experience of being a woman of the south, whose family always had

women that worked She was a mother and a grandmother, and very much aware of the responsibilities associated with those roles She had campaigned actively in her husband’s campaigns for the state senate, with the governor’s office, and most definitely for the presidency And while in the governor’s office, Carter had appointed Mrs. Carter, I’m going to go with Carter and Mrs. Carter, Carter had appointed Mrs. Carter to the governor’s commission for mental health reform So when they entered the White House, incidentally they were the first since Thomas Jefferson to walk the parade route, which was an extraordinary act in and of itself, she entered with expertise in campaigning and policymaking as well as a rich set of personal and familial networks And that was evident in the media coverage which gradually changed across her time there, from the first new, First Lady cover, through her mental health work, and into her campaigning for 19, in the 1980 reelection campaign So what did she do in the White House? This goes to John’s question First, she managed traditions, in a beautiful and fluid way, in the midst of the Equal Rights Amendment and feminist revolutions So the traditional feminine perspectives on the First Lady, including the holiday parties, 35 state dinners in four years, and then she moved into office And The Office of the First Lady was renovated, reformed, revolutionized by Rosalynn Carter, with increased specializing and departmentalization She’s shown here with Madeline McBean, and then with Mary Finch Hoyt, her press secretary Whoops, hold on Here we go As a policy entrepreneur, one of the most remarkable elements of her work was her independent travel She began with a trip to Latin America in 1977, sent as the President’s representative to meet with heads of state and heads of government, to discuss issues as diverse as weapons sales and disarmament, and trade barriers and trade alliances The diversity of her international travel can be illustrated by going straight to 1979, two years later, when she led an effort to increase international awareness, of the extraordinary circumstance of Cambodian refugees in Thailand Through her work, her travel, she brought international attention and fundraising efforts to respond to this humanitarian crisis And having read the papers when she returned, I can tell you that this was extremely difficult for her staff Today, we would call her work centered on the politics of identity, as she reached out to work very extensively for those who are senior citizens, and for those who are women You can see her here with Lady Bird Johnson, Betty Ford, and representative Bella Abzug lifting the Torch of Liberty in her work for the ERA But as others have said, her work in mental health was really her signature In four years, she took the cause of mental health reform from an idea to a commission, she’s shown here at hearings in Chicago, to a completed report, there we go, to legislation that was actively and actually funded, quite extensively, for major reforms at the national level in our mental health care In 1980, as the Iran hostage crisis wore on, she became the President’s point person in the reelection campaign, traveling to over 166 cities and becoming among the first of the First Ladies to be a public fundraiser for the presidential campaign So when that campaign was lost, it must have seemed to Rosalynn Carter that a lot of political opportunities were lost, certainly the mental health reforms and programs that she had initiated were immediately de-funded in the Reagan Administration To understand the post-presidency is to understand the work of a woman who has once again revolutionized undertakings She remains a formidable policy entrepreneur, with five books to her credit, three centered on caregiving and mental health care She is the head of The Rosalynn Carter Institute, a major clearinghouse for ideas and understandings relating to caregiving and to mental health And of course, she’s very active in Habitat for Humanity, as you will be seeing But I’d like to draw your attention to her tool belt This is one of my favorite pictures, where you can just barely see, can you see that RSC in there? We all know, I speak as a member of the public, Rosalynn Carter as Rosalynn Carter, but every memo in the White House was initialed RSC

She always remembered, as Jason has said, where she came from She always took the Smith with her And I’ve never forgotten all those memos initialed RSC, so when I saw this tool belt, she’s still doin’ it So the partnership continues, and it’s a very vibrant and dynamic one, as you have heard And it’s something that says a great deal about us, that we’re becoming aware of what an extraordinary thing that is Her work was often in the background, with the exception of mental health, and that sometimes does not earn the respect that it merits But in this play, authored by Lawrence Wright, her interactions with Jimmy Carter, Anwar Sadat, Menachem Begin, are accurately portrayed as facilitating the exchange amongst the individuals who would lead to major changes, as Jason has said, in the Middle East peace agreements So I leave you with a quote that is so very typical of this woman’s profundity, depth, and succinctness Thank you (crowd applauding) – Thank you Would it be fair to ask you for a historical comparison of Rosalynn Carter to other First Ladies? Anyone come to mind that– – I think the thing that’s remarkable is people to often turn to Eleanor Roosevelt But Eleanor Roosevelt had to excuse every trip she took “My husband says it’s all right “I’m just the eyes and ears of the President.” And the difference for Rosalynn Carter and Jimmy Carter is that President Carter said that he sent her to be more than his eyes and ears She was there to conduct conversations, to build relationships, and to actively participate in policymaking President Johnson sent Lady Bird Johnson out to sell the successes of his administration, and to advocate strongly for controversial programs, including the Civil Rights Act and Urban Renewal But he masked those, so she had a whistlestop tour through the south, where she had beautification, rather than urban development I think the difference with Rosalynn and Jimmy Carter is that there was a forthrightness with the public that this woman, his wife, would be more than goodwill tours, more than someone whose activism and whose mindfulness had to be excused Her creativity was advertised by the President, and her advocacy was respected by the President So it’s a major change, and one that we’re gradually seeing continue with fits and starts – There was a closeness and love there too that permeated everything they did, which I think made a huge difference All right, we saw the photo of Rosalynn and Jimmy and the tool belt, and now we’re gonna have Johnathan Reckford tell us about the impact of the Carters on Habitat for Humanity I mean, that’s a, you should have that on all your fundraising posters, but you probably already do – We have it a lot, John, thank you It’s an honor to be here, and to talk about two of my favorite subjects that are really synonymous with Habitat for Humanity and the Carters, and two of the things if you ask most people, “What do you know about Habitat for Humanity?” They would say, “Oh, President Carter started it, “and they give away houses.” So we’re actually best known for two things that aren’t true But it is– (all laughing) But it is no question, I think, though President and Mrs Carter did not start Habitat, they unquestionably put it on the map And I’m not sure anybody would have heard of it, or very far fewer people would have ever heard of it had they not gotten involved in 1984 And in context, Habitat started in 1976, and those first eight years, it was able to help about 1,000 families globally in a handful of places And in 1984, it’s hard to remember how radical it was that an ex-President and former First Lady would get on a bus and drive from Plains, Georgia to New York City and spend a week sleeping in a church basement and renovating a tenement house on the Lower East Side And that drew unbelievable amounts of press And to put that in context, in their direct work now, in the 33 times they have spent a week somewhere in the world building homes with families, they have directly worked with 100,000 volunteers in 14 countries and built, renovated and repaired nearly 4,000 homes But that really doesn’t begin to touch the impact that they’ve had because Habitat, in the period since they have got involved, has now helped 10 million people have new or improved housing And you can see the inflection point from their engagement Also, I think personally, the thing I’m so struck is is not just what they’ve done, but how they’ve done it and who they are One of my favorites stories is, it actually came from one of my friends on their Secret Service detail who have been along on so many of these journeys and they said one time, they were watching, which is always awkward if you’re in the Secret Service

because they have to watch the Carters work hard and they can’t help, because they have to keep them safe, so President Carter was a deacon at the local church in Plains, so he was out mowing the lawn And, so think about that But he was mowing a lawn, and a big car drove up into the church driveway, and a person rolled down the window and said, “Hey, isn’t this the church where Jimmy Carter “teaches Sunday School?” (crowd laughing) He looked up, had a cap on, “Yep.” Turned to his wife, “Hey, this is the church where “Jimmy Carter teaches Sunday School.” And they rolled up the window and drove off (all laughing) Just didn’t occur to them that you’d see a former President out in front, mowing the lawn And it is, and we see that so often And it’s really both of them, and in terms of inspiring people about the idea of servant leadership, they are the only two that have been part of all 33 Carter Work Projects Last summer, we built in Memphis, Tennessee There’s a longer story about how we end up in Memphis in the summer, but the second day, it was 110 heat index, it was really hot, and I was laughing because President Carter, first time he had turned to me, said, “You know, this isn’t quite as much fun “as back when I was 80.” (crowd laughing) And I thought, “You know, to aspire to such a statement “is a truly remarkable thing.” But they have lent their equity in so many ways, and I think President Carter would be the first to say this is a vehicle for putting his faith into action And in a time in our country and world where we have so much division, I have seen literally comments from people around the world of saying, “You know, I don’t agree with their theology, “but I’m so glad they’re here “They make our community better.” Which is such I think the way we would like to see, people of faith would like to see their faith acknowledged and expressed, and they have brought hope to so many My first Carter Project was in Lonavala, India And it was chosen because President Carter’s mother had served in the Peace Corps there And we were, I think we had people from 21 different countries working on two small, we were working on a duplex, so there were actually two families with a shared common wall, and actually the women were the homeowners, but these are their husbands And at the end of the week, we gathered around, and dedication ceremonies were also the most stirring part of the week, and people were just sharing their experiences of the week And here, a gentleman named Subhash on the right, put his arm around his new neighbor Aziz, and this process of their sweat equity and working together over the months prior to and then during that week, and he said, “You know, we’re from different castes “One”, in India, as you know, a big social barrier, “And we’re from different faiths, one Hindu, one Muslim “But now we’re brothers.” And this process of coming together, as Desmond Tutu said is so much more than just a physical place to live And he said, “As the physical walls go up, “the invisible walls that separate us as people “come tumbling down, and hope is built in the community.” And I think President and Mrs. Carter have been just exemplars and ambassadors of that hope in so many contexts throughout the world Another piece to me is my definition of integrity is that wholeness, in all circumstances, and I have been with them, with some of the most powerful people in the world, and some of the least powerful and least well-off, in material terms, people in the world, and they are always the same in all circumstances, which I think is a remarkable thing It is, the first time I met them, I was really nervous President Carter was the official chair of my selection to join Habitat, so the last step was to drive down to Plains and meet with them I was excited about it, but a little bit nervous as well That long drive from the Atlanta airport and came in, and they just could not, for all of you who have met them, they could not have been more gracious, and they sat together holding hands, and we had this lovely conversation And I think it is such an image that in so many places, you just see them quietly holding hands and walking together, and Mrs. Carter has been such a remarkable example of strength and determination with civility, which is a combination we also need more of in our world, and she has spoken of so strongly but, has often said, it gets very emotional when she talks about the impact of the family she has gotten to know, in all these various contexts and locations and always says that we get so much more out of the chance to serve than anything we are able to give And I think their collective, their combined example of service has defined, certainly redefined the post-presidency but for really now generations to find what it is to serve and have impact in your community So it is so appropriate, I think,

that they are the recipients of the Ivan Allen Prize for Social Courage I can’t think of anyone more deserving, and it’s certainly been one of the great honors and privilege of my life to work alongside them and to call them friends Thank you (crowd applauding) – I was disappointed last year when the Nepal trip was canceled because we were gonna actually go to Nepal and cover that, and I was looking forward to it but because of the circumstances in country, it was canceled So let me know when you reschedule Nepal – We would love to, we were all crushed It was the right decision, but it was so disappointing – So I, you know, the Carters are amazing but to see them actually working at altitude and doing this thing with the tool belt, I mean, that’s extraordinary Lisa Gordon is the CEO of the Atlanta Habitat for Humanity and you can give us a closer look at the local picture What has this meant for Atlanta and the Carter involvement? – Good morning everyone, it’s just an honor to be here, talking about the work of President and Mrs. Carter And in the local community here in Atlanta, it’s been significant Our affiliate was started in 1983, and was doing five to 10 homes a year And in 1991, President and Mrs. Carter had the idea of can we do something to revitalize and transform Atlanta? And they came up with the Atlanta Project, and it was a project that was lasting five years, but the impact of it was about 10 years, and so, I’ll just share a few pictures This first picture shows them actively working on the homes with us, in the community And on the next slide, you just see a dedication, so not only were President and Mrs. Carter active throughout this project, in 1966 is when it was coming into the Olympics where we built over 100 homes, and this is actually a picture, and if you see on the left, with Arthur Blank where they were dedicating the 100th home that was part of that two year challenge And I think the power of partnerships was, their personal partnership with each other, but with the community, but they galvanized civic organizations, faith organizations, corporate sponsors, and the community in a way that really leveraged the work of Habitat, that had no been done before So I really feel like the Atlanta Habitat affiliate is very fortunate to have had them invest time, money, their influence to build that partnership On the next picture you see, during this project, they even had gotten Michael Jackson to come and do a concert here in Atlanta, which at that time, was just during the time when he was the King of Pop in the 90s, so you know how phenomenal that would be to have a fundraising event where it’s a concert, and that kind of leverage we don’t, we just don’t have that And seeing those partners come together In the next image, this was just a build, and I think that what all the speakers have talked about is the human connection of partnership When you actually connect with someone, when someone passes you a nail or you get a hammer or you actually hit your thumb ’cause you’re not that, you know, you’re on the build site, you’re on the roof, you’re caulking, you’re doing all these activities that seem very simple, but they’re connecting in that at the end of the day, you see how it transforms the family, and how it transforms the community And I think that’s the power of partnership And our next image, I just wanted to bring this, ’cause I’m a numbers geek So I wanted to show this impact because when you talk about catalytic change, in 1991, we were just under 20 homes, and in that five year period, we went from 20 to 50 And in the two year period of ’95, ’96 and ’97, is when we built the 100 homes for the Olympics And then after that, you see that number stays up there at about 50 or 60 homes And so it goes from an investment of about $660,000, to $3.7 million in a three year period, but if you see those first three years, it almost doubles every year And that kind of catalytic change was not only the resources that were invested, it was the people and the partnerships And in the next slide, you’ll see some pictures, you’ll see President Clinton, you see Vice President Al Gore, you see President Carter President Carter and Mrs Carter were instrumental in continuing to bring the partnership, the awareness, and the investment to the local community, which is just phenomenal In the next image, one of the things I wanted to bring up is that our house sponsorships and our volunteers, so in ’91, we had about 50 people giving us sponsorships and by the end of that 10 year period, it had doubled And today, our sponsorships is close to 250 sponsors Many of those sponsors continued from the time of this Atlanta Project

Also the volunteers during that volume, in 1991, was about 5,300 It doubled to about 10,000 And at the height of building for the Olympics was 17,000 people Imagine that they had never picked up a hammer, but are now volunteers, and we have maintained that We have about 13,000 volunteers that volunteer with us each and every year And so in this slide, I guess you can see it better, these are some of the partners that have built with us since the Atlanta Project, and they’re 25 year partners, churches, corporations, and continued investment So really, that catalytic change is something that we continue to benefit from And in the next slide, I just wanted to share that that legacy of partnership continues in our own mission today So we just updated our mission last year, and one of the things we wanted to focus back on is that transformation of communities, catalyzing neighborhood revitalization, working with other partners, and creating long-term relationships with the family and the community And I feel like that Atlanta Project was the beginning of putting all those components together In our last slide, this just tells you what we’re doing today We’re still making a huge impact in Atlanta, about $6 million in economic impact each year, so in the last year, we built 50 homes, we served families through critical repair, and we have continued to get sponsors and individual sponsors And one of the things we’re doing that’s new which is our ReStores, which is where we divert goods to a store and resell them, our ReStore had a one and a half million dollars in sales, but I still, again, it’s all of those connecting points with people who share our mission, our love for revitalization, and that was catalyzed by President and Mrs. Carter And the last slide is just we awarded them the Golden Hammer, that’s our highest award, but it should be like a Platinum Hammer for all the work they’ve done, and for the legacy that they have allowed us to be part of And so we’re so thankful for all that they do, and that work still is giving us benefits today (crowd applauding) – [John] In terms of celebrity involvement, I mean, the role of the Carters being there, you’ve attracted so many other well-known people It’s sort of a rollercoaster effect, isn’t it? Yeah Outstanding Well, at the very end of our row, Ambassador Young has waited patiently And now it’s his turn, and he may not answer my question because he tends so say whatever he wants to say, which is– (crowd laughing) But you’ve inspired a lot of people in your life Have the Carters inspired you? – Well they not only inspired me, they drafted me And we talk about President Carter’s life after politics But it was really an exceptional, he was an exceptional politician And coming out of Georgia, he was always on the progressive side of every issue And, it was very shocking when he became President and the Congressional Black Caucus didn’t want to meet with him And once they sat in a room with him, they all ended up supporting him for President He was running as a peanut farmer, and that was necessary because we were just coming out of the war in Vietnam But probably his work in disarmament, in climate change, in peace and reconciliation, he and Rosalynn together I think, I think she went to President Lopez Portillo’s inauguration before his inauguration, and came back from Mexico talking about the need for us to get involved with Panama, and suggesting that I be sent down to Latin America to confirm what she’d come back with But the President had already asked me to do something with Africa And what he did I think was probably, I don’t know whether he did this with everybody but, he said to me, “Go to Africa and ask African leaders “what they expect of this administration.” I think that’s unique And because we asked, we found out that they wanted us to do exactly what we wanted to do And I think that happened also not only in Panama but, in Africa, but he got the word from Sadat and Begin separately that something, that there would not be peace in the Middle East unless there could be peace between Egypt and Israel

And, the security and stability that has remained in the Middle East for the last 50 years is directly related to his personal negotiations between Sadat and Begin It’s remarkable that during his time as President, not a single American was killed in battle And not a single American killed anybody And I think all of the work that you all are talking about, and you got on my nerves (laughs) talking about what a great ex-President he was He was the best damn President we’ve had in my lifetime (crowd laughing and applauding) I mean, he left, he left with a, the budget was a $60 billion deficit when he came in, and it was $60 billion when he went out, so he created no deficit He was financially stable, he was visionary in terms of foreign policy, and Rosalynn was at the heart of all of that She walked into the cabinet meetings quietly, after they sat down, and she sat quietly in the back and observed, and I know she commented on everything and anybody, everybody said, because it was a, it was maybe one of the most significant co-presidencies She never said hardly anything publicly, but he wouldn’t be married to her happily for 70 years if he didn’t listen to her (crowd laughing) That’s it (crowd applauding) – I’m curious, Andy, when you first encountered Jimmy Carter because, my guess is you probably were not a Carter supporter in the 1970 governor’s race so at some point, you met him and he won you over Is that correct? – Not quite He made– – The democratic primary in the 1970s – No, but it was, in ’66, I met him in Paschal’s, and he said, I said, “The only thing I know about “Sumter County, is Sheriff Chapel.” He said, “Oh yeah, he’s my friend.” Well Dr. King said that Sheriff Chapel was the meanest man in the world (chuckles) back in ’61 when we were in Albany And so that was a shock How am I gonna work with this guy? But shortly after that I met Chip and Miss Lillian And both of them were amongst the most progressive southerners I’d ever met And I said, “You know, this guy’s momma’s all right, “his son’s all right, he’s got to be okay too.” So it always has been a familiar affair with the Carters And back when they were picking on Billy, I made it a point to go down and meet him And, he and I sat there talking about the books that he had read, and things that we were trying to figure out, and the caricature of the family and the presidency is a great disservice, not only to the Carters, but to the nation And his, I would say that he probably knew more about nuclear war than all of our Presidents put together I mean, Admiral Rickover selected him from over 500 engineers, graduates of the Naval Academy, to be his deputy in developing a nuclear Navy And I think one of the reasons why he was so determined to maintain peace, he knew better the horrors of war, and had participated in helping to develop that defense capability But it was probably the reason why he was willing to lose an election, rather than bother with invading Iran And, interestingly enough, I saw the guy Bannon, in the White House press conference yesterday and he was holding on his, under his arm a very interesting book called “Going to Tehran”, written by two foreign service and CIA couple That is probably the most progressive thing I’ve heard about Iran since President Carter was President So I only say that, in the midst of all of the horrors and disasters, I think he taught us or they taught us that you had to look for the kernel of hope

And I saw that last night That’s what I want to remember from the press conference of the present President (all laughing) – Thank you for giving me that to hang onto (John laughs) But your mention of Miss Lillian I think is significant, because she was a remarkable woman, and a very progressive and enlightened woman And Chip did, did you get to know her? – Yeah, I knew, we called her Grandmama, and you know, one of the amazing things, just on a personal level for me, all four of my great-grandmothers went to college of some kind So if you think about how generations go, I’m probably the oldest person for whom that’s gonna be true, one of the first ever, and my grandmother’s, the Smith family, Allie Smith, we called her Mother Allie, she had gone and gotten an advanced degree, she had a job throughout my grandmother’s life at the post office in Plains, but my grandmother, my great-grandmother, Miss Lillian, I think that her experiences really infected my whole family and at the time, that must have been that Andy met her, she had just come back from the Peace Corps And you know, she turned 70 in the Peace Corps, which means it’s not too late for anybody here But I think that her experience did a couple things Number one, you know, go to India from, as a little old lady, you know, from south Georgia, really taught them again that these, that this community or any community can send people anywhere and make a difference And it really binds people up in this sort of fabric of humanity in a real way But the other thing that I think it did is that when he got out of the White House in his 50s, she was standing there saying, “I turned 70 in the Peace Corps “What are you gonna do?” And I think she would be proud at this point But if you mind one last Miss Lillian story about journalists as well– – Please – So she, she had many, she had more than one child, right? She had four children But you know, one of them was running for President and was going around telling everybody that he would never tell a lie So the New York Times comes down, the well-respected New York Times as we called it in my family– (crowd laughing) – As opposed to dishonest media fake news – Fake news The New York Times comes down and to interview at this little house, you know, dirt road in Plains, and she comes to the door as a gracious southern woman and says, “Oh, it’s so nice to see you, come in, “would you like anything to eat? “Sit down.” They have this interview Finally the guy gets to the point, the reporter, and says, “You know, your son is out there telling everybody “he’ll never tell a lie “Did he ever tell, do you remember him, “do you mean to have us believe “that he never told a lie growing up?” And she said, “Well, I’m sure he told a white lie.” And of course, as a good journalist would do, he said, “Well what’s a white lie?” And she said, “Well, do you remember when you came “to the door and I said it was nice to see you?” (all laughing) – So, Ambassador Peters, you’re relatively new to Atlanta – I am – You plunked down here in The Carter Center and a lot of, you’re hearing some history today, you may know some of this but, how does all this meld with you being here in Atlanta, the cradle of the civil rights movement? I mean, talk about the significance of The Carter Center being in this city – Well, I did in fact move to Atlanta to take this job from Newport, Rhode Island I will confess that one of the things that surprised me was the vibrant and unique character of Atlanta And so it’s been a privilege to learn about Ivan Allen, and of course, I knew about Ambassador Young as a former diplomat myself, but to learn about the history of the city and how, in a way, you know, two roads diverged, and, well all right, Alabama took one road, and Georgia took another, Atlanta took one road, so that’s been a real privilege to understand just, the kind of place where The Carter Center, you know, lives and works, where we live and work But again, we couldn’t be part of a community that didn’t represent those values because, you know, our job is to take those values and turn them in to ways to, ways to alleviate suffering, ways to wage peace So I actually think that it would be very difficult for The Carter Center to be in the Atlanta that had taken the other road – And the Center of Global Health that’s here is just incredible – Oh, exactly, very good point As Jason points out, we have not only the CDC, but we have the Task Force for Global Health

We have many organizations that are coming together, and a group I’ll give a little plug to, the Georgia Global Health Alliance, which is pulling organizations together that work on global health, and there are a number, Emory as well, I think everyone here is aware of the impact of Atlanta in various ways on global health So thank you Jason, that’s another way in which it’s a perfect petri dish for us – In Copenhill, where The Carter Center is, I don’t know if this is true or not, I’ve never really pinned it down, but allegedly is the spot, or one of the spots, where General Sherman watched the burning of Atlanta Is that true, Jason? – You go ahead – You go ahead, no, you go ahead, Jason You go ahead. (chuckles) – So– – I want sources on this – It is, I can get you the sources, they’re Georgia Tech sources in fact, but it was the place, sort of the north, excuse me, the easternmost part of the current parking lot was the place where the, the northern, the Union Army’s headquarters was And so it was where a variety of different things happened but there’s some controversy among the historians about whether Sherman actually watched Atlanta burn But if he did, that’s where the place where he did – We like the story I mean– (all laughing) Print the legend, not the story – That is the spot – I want to, I think it’s appropriate now to open it up, maybe hear questions from the audience? Because we got a lot of, a lot of stuff to talk about here So please, if you have questions for any particular panelist, or a group of panelists? This is so unlike the White House press conference yesterday (crowd laughing) Yes? – [Crowd Member] Yeah, I’ve had the pleasure of knowing – We have a mic runner too – [Crowd Member] I’ve had the pleasure of knowing the Carters for about 27, 28 years, lost track but, Jody Powell told me one time as the followup on how Mrs. Carter was always in the cabinet room that she was the sharpest person in the room besides the President, you know, and she would always go up afterwards and so forth And one of the things I’ve observed over the years, which at least anyway, it’s my observation, is she was always so observant, watching what was going on in the room, and different situations and she would go in and intervene, you know, just quietly and casually to correct things, or to do this And then a couple of times she’d say, when Jimmy mis-stepped, she’d say, “Well what President Carter meant to say was”, you know? And so she would correct him very diplomatically So you know, the woman behind the man, that it was a good team, a good partnership – Well this is an interesting question for you in terms of the influence of a First Lady on actual policy Pillow talk, as it were How does Rosalynn Carter stack up in that regard? – I think that one of the most remarkable things about the Carters is that they were very forthright about it And so, when you read the oral histories, it’s just wonderful because Pat Caddell, if he had bad news, was very forthright He would come and give it to Mrs. Carter, and Mrs. Carter would give it to Mr. Carter And the reason for that was because it’s, not only is it hard to give a President bad news, but Presidents are optimists They have to be, they’re running against odds every time they turn around, right? So to have somebody that can deliver bad news and not be dismissed, and taken seriously, it’s a very big deal So I think that what you’re looking at, time and again, with First Ladies is that ability to quietly deliver bad news in a way that doesn’t make it palatable, it’s time to be a grown up, but instead requires responsibility And Rosalynn Carter did that brilliantly well, and was known for doing it throughout the White House So that also meant that she was respected for it It’s very hard to be respected when you could be perceived as a barrier, right? And instead she was viewed as an honest broker, and in the work that I’ve done in the White House to be viewed as an honest broker is perhaps the highest complement that can be paid to anyone – All right Any other questions? – Can I– – Yes, please – Can I just say about that ask, it seemed to me that the difference between their presidency and marriage and others is that they never spoke as competitors or rivals They spoke as one And her influence was through him, and not parallel to him – I think that’s very true and I think the other thing that was going on at this time, of course you have the Equal Rights Amendment, so the thing that Rosalynn Carter’s negotiating is that there’s no accepted, single standard for how women should conduct themselves as women,

as professionals, as wives Instead, there’s huge culture wars being waged over that And so to watch her negotiations of that with a rare grace so that she incurred considerable criticism from all sides, but equal criticism from all sides, and that was I think in some ways her ability was gracefulness under criticism I would agree with you, yes, Ambassador Young – There used to be the Steel Magnolia stories – Yes – And part of that, southern, southern grace And lest we forget, when the Carters came to Washington, they were not welcome with open arms They were outlanders, and there was some blame to be passed out on both sides there, but would you say that Rosalynn Carter was a moderating influence? And I didn’t want to interrupt your train of thought, but– – I’ll go after you – Go ahead first, I was just gonna, when you’re done, I was just gonna mention that I know that my grandmother sent a note to the current First Lady just to give some advice about some things, I was just gonna mention it, but, unless you want to hear that now? (Jason laughing) – Please, go ahead, please tell us more – Well no I mean, just to, exactly to Dr. Borrelli’s point, and I think this is something that, you know, you confront in law firms, in colleges at every level of our communities now, especially I’m 41 years old, my wife confronts this, we all do You know, there is no accepted way that women are supposed to behave, there’s just not And one of the things that there’s cultural wars, to your point, all the time, and my grandmother sat down, and in many ways, she and Melania don’t have a lot in common but in other ways, she just wrote this very personal note to her and told us about it And what she said was, “You’re never gonna be able “to do it right “So do what you want “You’re gonna be criticized no matter how you act, “so you should be true to yourself, “and plug it in the way that you want to.” And she said that that was the same advice that Lady Bird Johnson had given to her which was, you know, “There is no good way, because you’re going to get “criticized no matter what, so be yourself “and conduct yourself in the way that you want.” I just thought that was a pretty fascinating sort of lineage there But in any event, I didn’t mean to jump on there – No, I think the other thing that it goes to is that she’s also telling the new First Lady to do something So this is a woman who’s active (crowd laughing) Right? No, I mean, think about it Bess Truman said the best thing that she could do was sit silently and have her hat on straight And instead, in private, you may not know this, but Bess Truman is responsible for much of the early cancer research funding That was her voice in the President’s ear So in terms of thinking about Rosalynn Carter and this mediation, it’s important to remember that the Carters were outsiders, after a long line of insiders So here, it’s like, “Who are you?” I mean, the Jimmy Who campaign continued after the election And I think that Rosalynn Carter encountered a lot of that in her First Ladyship, and that was part of her negotiations To have 35 state dinners in the space of four years was part of a deliberate outreach to the Washington community that enjoyed them so much, as well as to the international sphere So her facilitation of the administration occurred both internationally and domestically, and it occurred traditionally as well as through more, for First Ladies, more innovative areas of advanced public policymaking – And the Easter Egg role– – Easter Egg role – Which is coming up, and that’s a very important role for the First Lady My humor was not appreciated there (John and crowd laughing) Your question? (crowd member mumbling) – [Crowd Member] I think one of the Carter’s strengths has been their commitment to the hometown Plains, Georgia has benefited so much from their presence there, and their continued investment in the community, and it has been evolving and it seems as though they always know the right next trick to grow the economy, and the most recent one, which was written up in the New York Times a few days ago the development of solar panels to be able to power half of Plains, Georgia from their own pecan farm So I guess my question is, what is next? He seems to always be leading the way in terms of, you know, rural southern Georgia And it’s a commitment he’s made Do you think he’s having an impact? And what are his aspirations going forward for the next best commitment there? – Well, you know, it is, it is their home, not just their hometown, but their home I mean, it’s the only place that they’ve ever really called home, and I think that their roots and that, you know, has been discussed in a lot of context

I sort of drew an analogy to small villages in Africa where they were, others have talked about their connection to that land giving them a perspective on the Middle East peace process and the way in which Palestinians and Israelis and others sort of feel a connection to the physical space that’s there We had a great time with this 10-acre solar field that, to your point, can, at maximum output, generate all of Plains’ required electricity And I think one of the things that we talk about a lot in our family is, you know, for all of the little towns in south Georgia that don’t have a President, what’s gonna happen there? Plains is a national park It is a place that will always be a museum, essentially In fact, the Jimmy Carter National and Historic Site that’s there is the only national park in the country that preserves a Depression-era rural environment Which if you think about the impact that that era and those places had on our national ethos is crazy, right? But the worry that we have in my family is that everybody in the world is gonna have to go to Plains someday to see what it’s like to live in a small town, because these towns are dying on the vine And there’s a lot that’s going on, there’s a lot of disconnection, there’s a lack of connection from a financial standpoint And in other ways to how do we grow economies? What makes sense? Even in a bigger town like Hazlehurst, Georgia, where I was this last weekend, or Douglas, which I was just discussing earlier this morning, there’s a real struggle there and in one way that you can plug in to the new economy is with renewable energy, as we discussed this week, and as was out there But there are others, and really thinking hard about what those economies look like, and what it is that we need to preserve and the real value of those communities is something that my grandparents represent the best of, in many ways And it’s something that I hope and that they hope will really sort of become a part of a discussion about them and their lives as the real value in many of those places And again, this solar field is a great example of a way to think hard and create jobs in a place where folks don’t normally think of building sort of innovative and new things But it matters, and they’re experts in that And they’re a great example of what happens when you give, you know, good education to people in small towns – Yes? We got a mic for you here, there eou go – [Crowd Member] Thanks I have a question that kind of relates to that and since that I’m from a small town in Georgia myself, and one of the concerns that, Greensboro, and one of the concerns that I have is about the quality of healthcare, and the availability and access to medicine, period And I just wonder if they have some, with their concerns about health generally, if they have some concerns about what is happening to the rural health system in Georgia? – Did you address that to anyone, a particular individual? – [Crowd Member] Anybody, but I was looking at Jason, since he had a personal connection down there But anybody – Andy may have some thoughts too on that – Yeah – Yeah And if someone else would like to take it, I’ll just say you know, and maybe Mary Ann can talk a little bit about The Carter Center but, my grandmother’s passion for mental health parity, et cetera, has gotten her to a place now where they’re really spending a lot of time about where you get services, right? And that’s true from a community-based care standpoint, even in places like Atlanta, but particular Greene County, for example, or you go, you’re a little bit farther to Hancock County You know, they’re closing emergency rooms If you have a heart attack in Hancock County now, you know, 80% of those people die because you can’t get to an emergency room that’s 45 minutes away by car, and you gotta have a car And so that, the inequality of sort of the dispersion of healthcare is something that’s really important And of course, you know, my great-grandmother, Miss Lillian, to John’s point earlier, she was a nurse I mean, so they grew up, my grandfather was the first President ever born in a hospital because they plugged in to this rural healthcare system And so again, you know, their life story is a story about the value of ensuring healthcare in those places And so as we talk about them and their legacy, it’s certainly one of them And whoever else would like to add to that can do that but– – Oh, I have a mic I would just add that for President and Mrs. Carter, health is a human right The right, the access to healthcare is a human right And I know that, as they struggle to improve health for people, neglected people at the end of the road in Africa, they certainly feel the same way about people in Georgia and about, you know, the declining, actually, metrics all over this country for various reasons in terms of

infant mortality and other indicators that frankly have fallen to levels that should embarrass the world’s largest economy – The Carter presidency, Andy, was a human rights presidency That’s the first time you really heard that term, as I recall – It was, and we always talked about civil rights but I think he was the first one to appoint an Office of Human Rights Young lady from, it was Hodding Carter’s wife, I forget, and we had actually an Office of Human Rights that not only provided for advance of human rights in this country but he introduced it abroad And the whole, you know, opening of dialogue with South Africa was basically in response to human rights And it was shocking when, told to go ask African leaders I also went to the Afrikaans and got P.W. Botha to think about human rights, in terms of his own human right And what I found was very interesting, very similar to what we found here was that he really felt that there was gonna be a bloodbath In fact, one of the questions he asked me was, “How long do we have before the bloodbath?” And I said, “You won’t have one.” He said, “How can you say that?” I said, “Because you don’t know Nelson Mandela, “you don’t know Desmond Tutu.” And they were educated by the same kinds of missionaries that educated Martin Luther King And remember that Gandhi started in South Africa also and he went back to India and transformed India without killing anybody And so it was, it started a dialogue with people about things that we didn’t use to talk about – Would you say that you had to pressure President Carter on human rights, or was it the other way around? – No, indeed In fact, he pressured me, I didn’t want to leave the Congress And Coretta King said, “Look, Stevenson couldn’t stay “at the UN but two years with Kennedy “How long you think they’ll let you stay in the UN?” And I said, “Well I’ll stay longer than Stevenson.” But he pressured me to, he said, I said, “No, I’d rather wait “and come in your second term.” He said, “No, there may not be a second term “Whatever we’re going to do, we have to do now.” – Really? – And so I left the Congress, but that, the way I have learned to understand that one little phrase, and I’m sorry I didn’t keep it, ’cause it was in his own handwriting but to ask leaders what they expect of us I call that the politics of respect And I think that he did that with the Russians, with the Chinese, and, he always encouraged people to talk and it, it was very difficult, because that was not the State Department’s policy And I find myself almost identifying with the confusion going on now, and I don’t want to identify too much but we were really rejected for telling the truth And that was one of the things he said You know, you don’t lie So somebody asked me, “What do you”, well Dan Rather, first week, “What do you think about the Cubans in Africa?” And I said, “I think they’ve been a stabilizing force.” Well that was the wrong answer (all laughing) – I think I read that in a somewhere – Yeah it was a headline but, I knew that the Cubans were there protecting gulf oil, and then Angola, they never missed a day pumping oil because the Cubans were there protecting them from rebels in Congo, that we were supporting And it didn’t, it didn’t make sense, but it was the truth And I think that that was the basis of human rights was that you tell the truth and let the chips fall where they may Now that was always a problem for him, and I’ll tell this story and then shut up because Abner Mikva said that Jimmy Carter was the only President he’d ever heard of that seemed to have read every bill And when the

tax committee went to take the tax code there, said it was about 10 inches thick, and when they went in to talk with the President about the tax code, he had little yellow notes all the way through it and they said, “Golly!” He said it intimidated the hell out of ’em because none of them had read it (all laughing) And he said that was a strength and weakness, because he intimidated people, and I never went into a briefing on anything where he didn’t know more than I did, about things that I’ve been working with all my life And so, you see that though in the number of books that he’s produced, and you see that in his still hours before daylight, then waking up and doing a wide variety of things and, I think that that’s sort of the secret of their life The most, well, when I went to lunch at the White House, the only one time, I was served one glass of unsweetened ice tea, one half of tuna fish sandwich with no mayonnaise, and one slice of lettuce, with one piece of pineapple And I was expecting a big fancy lunch (all laughing) And I said, “They eat right.” You know, and I think that’s the reason you see them so healthy at the age they are And it’s always intimidating to me to be around him and feel so inadequate and undisciplined– (all laughing) And downright sorry He put you on a guilt trip just by listening to him – That, sir, is an amazing statement I’m gonna remember that We’ve got time for maybe one more question Go back to the back of the room There’s a mic there for you Yes? – [Crowd Member] Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity, ’cause I’m a Georgia Tech student So my question is for Mr. Jason Carter I think Mr. Reckford mentioned a lot about how Mr. and Mrs. Carter showed integrity day by day, and also about their love, how it’s so endearing, even though they’ve been married for more than 70 years, and I find that almost impossible to think about how people could be so endearing And my question is, have you noticed anything, any habits or something that they practice every day that really roots them in that integrity and love? – I think there’s sort of two things that are remarkable to me I think one is their faith And Mr. Reckford, the folks at Habitat see that every day Mary Ann sees that every day Their faith really grounds them And you know, so much damage has been done to the public face of Christianity over the course of its politicization over the last, say, 25 years My opinion But they have this true and abiding belief that if they do right by other people that it will bring them closer to God, and they share that together in a way that is very real and that manifests itself in their life every day And as perhaps as a part of that, they keep it simple I mean, the story that Ambassador Young told about the tuna fish sandwich, I mean, if you go to Plains on a Saturday, any Saturday, they will have for lunch the same lunch that they’ve had every day for 70 years, which is hot dogs with slaw on the top, and a Bloody Mary (crowd laughing) And that’s what they eat And you know, one time, you know, we sat, my wife and I, we were flying every year, the family goes on a trip that they take us on There were 39 Carter family members on this trip this year, which is, you know, grandchildren and grandchildren spouses, and then great-grandchildren, and you know, I mean a huge number of people But a couple of years ago, we were on a flight, just on a regular Delta flight from Atlanta, I think we were going to Nicaragua And my grandmother, you know, when the flight gets up, they, this goes along with your story about him mowing the lawn, right? My grandmother reaches into her purse and she takes out this Tupperware with this pimento cheese in it, and this loaf of, you know, white Wonder Bread, or whatever it was, and a plastic knife, and she starts asking people if they want a pimento cheese sandwich (crowd laughing) And they’re sitting in coach, in a Delta flight, and the people next to them, they had already gotten up and said hello and shaken everybody’s hand, but they’re thinking like, “This is the former President “of the United States and the First Lady “and she’s sitting here with aa plastic knife “spreading pimento cheese on some white bread”, because that’s what they were gonna eat And you know, she wasn’t gonna eat very much, because it’s pimento cheese, but you know the point is– (crowd laughing)

The point is, they don’t, they stayed who they were And you know, I’m a lawyer, right? I’ve seen lawyers have big success and change who they are You know? You’ve seen people who get a job like being the head of Habitat for Humanity in Atlanta and change who they are You haven’t done that Lisa, I’m just saying– (crowd laughing) My only point, my only point lisa is that you have an impressive job, right, and it’s the kind of thing that for some people, it changes who they are, but my grandparents went and did what they did and never changed And that, it’s such, they live in the same house, they do the same things every day, they appreciate those simple things, and they just never got ahead of themselves And how they’ve done that together really I think is what has kept them together – Thank you Jason I think we need to draw this to a close I don’t know about you but I’ve enjoyed this immensely, this has been terrific So Jason, Mary Ann, and MaryAnne, Johnathan, Lisa, Andy, thank you for being here, and shedding some, some real interesting light on the Carters and their many, many contributions and their humanity And thank you all for being here (crowd applauding) Lunch is next

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SPIRIT OF FIRE AWARDS 2020

Good evening everyone and welcome to the 2020 Spirit of Fire awards I’m delighted that we’re able to come together virtually today to recognise some of the incredible achievements of individuals and teams from across the fire services community Spirit of Fire has always been a special occasion it’s an opportunity for us as a charity to say thank you and to recognise the incredible hard work and dedication you put in to supporting us for you meanwhile it’s a chance however begrudgingly to accept the recognition that you truly deserve, something that I know doesn’t come easily to many of you. This year of course things are different the coronavirus pandemic has impacted every one of us you as key workers have had to work at the front line ensuring the safety of your local communities and supporting the work of your colleagues across the blue light services for us as your charity meanwhile we’ve had to innovate in order to support you digitally and we’ve had to recognise new ways to raise income in the face of a devastating downturn in fundraising due to the cancellation of events. It’s been tough for all of us but as ever The Firefighters Charity continues to be there for you and you continue to be there for us so once again thank you In line with the digital innovation we’ve seen over the past few months we’ve embraced the opportunity to take Spirit of Fire online this year and I am delighted to say that we have a fantastic show lined up for you and a whole host of special guests to announce our very deserving nominees and winners. You can interact with the show tonight by commenting on the Youtube stream on our Twitter and Facebook pages or by using the hashtag with you in spirit on any social media channel you wish So have a great evening enjoy the show and congratulations to all those of you nominated Good evening everyone and welcome to The Firefighters Charity’s first ever virtual Spirit of Fire awards my name is Kim Robson and I’m delighted to be your host tonight as we get ready to celebrate the achievements of some truly remarkable individuals. We have 14 awards in total tonight 12 Spirit of Fire awards and two special recognition awards and having had a sneak peek already I can safely say that all of them feature some incredible stories of dedication hard work and courage. I can also reveal that we’ve handed over presentation duties to some very special celebrity guests this evening all of whom have given up their time for The Firefighters Charity free of charge and out of their admiration for all that the fire services community does And what a year it’s been as you’ve just heard from the Chair of the Board of Trustees the pandemic has had a huge impact on us all. So tonight I ask you to put all the stresses and strains of 2020 to one side, to sit back relax and join us in applauding some brilliant people

Our first award of the evening is our Special Recognition Award for Excellence in the Field of Mental Health, and to announce our very deserving winner I am honoured to be able to introduce to you his Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge Good evening I’m delighted to be able to introduce the 2020 Spirit of Fire Awards. Last September on 999 day I visited Harcombe House and saw for myself the great work being done by The Firefighters Charity to help support the physical and mental health of fire staff across the country. This year the outbreak of Covid 19 has presented a unique challenge for all emergency responders You’ve had to adapt to new ways of working whilst continuing to save lives and help those in need day in day out. This is what makes the achievements that we are celebrating tonight all the more extraordinary. It is more important than ever that those on the front line know where they can turn to for support the work of The Firefighters Charity and all of the organisations who support our blue light services is central to ensuring the long-term health and well-being of our emergency responders I’m therefore delighted to be able to announce the winner of tonight’s first award the Spirit of Fire Special Recognition Award for Excellence in the Field of Mental Health goes to Shilla Patel. Alongside her work as an Inclusion Manager at the London Fire Brigade, Shilla launched the brigade’s first mental health support network United Mined in March 2019 Aiming to reduce stigma and help staff access support United Minds has gone from strength to strength under Shilla’s leadership and now has over 200 members. Shilla received support from The Firefighters Charity which allowed her to open up about her own mental health challenges Since then she’s made it her mission to help her colleagues feel able to do the same So congratulations Shilla it is because of the dedication of people like you that we can continue to break down barriers and ensure that everybody receives the support they need. And to all of tonight’s nominees and winners thank you once again for all that you do Congratulations Shilla what a well deserved award Now between each of our awards tonight we’ve also got a series of films to show you giving you an insight into the incredible breadth of work undertaken by the charity all of our films were shot before the coronavirus pandemic and our first of the evening is with Gloucestershire firefighter and premiership rugby player Sasha Acheson who suffered a shoulder injury that threatened to sideline her career Hi I’m Sasha I am a firefighter for Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service based at Cheltenham West and I am a rugby player for Worcester Warriors I’ve worked with the fire service I started off as being a retained firefighter for Cinderford in Gloucestershire and then I went through the interview process and became whole time about two years ago now. Being able to have a job where you’re part of such a community I think I’m very lucky super super lucky My shoulder injury so the one that I had earlier this year was playing premiership rugby at this ground actually and I ended up dislocating my left shoulder and I tore my rotator cuff it stopped me from working and it stopped me from playing rugby so that’s kind of what spurred me on to do something So I ended up walking 500 miles for charity from the most easterly point of mainland Great Britain to the most westerly point in mainland Great Britain. The reason that I chose to support The Firefighters Charity was because I pre-empted that I would be using their services after my operation I went to Marine Court, gym facilities are incredible the programmes that they set up with you with the hydrotherapy pool then doing specific weight sessions they also have psychological help if you want to talk to people then you can have those sessions as well and they all work side by side But the fact that I’m lucky enough to have a job where I can have access to a facility like that I just think it’s incredible so I’m yeah I’m so grateful Our second award tonight is for Supporter of the Year Control, and recognises the incredible support shown to the charity by those who work in control rooms across the UK To introduce our nominees and announce our winner I’m delighted to welcome Britain’s most decorated female Olympian boasting five Olympic rowing gold medals and four Olympic silver medals she’s also the first British woman to win medals at five successive Olympic games. Ladies and Gents

please welcome Dame Katherine Grainger Good evening everyone, and what an absolute privilege to be with you tonight to announce the nominees and also the winner of the supporter of the year control room staff award as part of The Firefighters Charity Spirit of Fire awards It is such an important time this year more than ever that we stop acknowledge and celebrate some really fantastic achievements clearly the courage and the bravery of the firefighters themselves brought the wonderful and invaluable contributions given by supporters. So it is honestly my genuine pleasure to be playing a tiny little part in tonight’s celebrations. But on to the nominees for the Spirit of Fire Supporter of the Year Control Room Staff award the nominees are, Linda Coughlan from Scottish Fire and Rescue Service born to a firefighter father Linda has been raising money for the charity since she was old enough to hold a collection tin today having worked her way up the ranks at Strathclyde Fire Brigade control she is central to fundraising across her region taking on numerous roles and dedicating untold hours to supporting the charity Nikki Haxton from Kent Fire and Rescue service. Nikki’s firefighter husband Danny tragically died on duty in London in 2017 Since then Nikki has honoured his memory and been an inspiration to her children and colleagues by taking on numerous challenges and organising events to raise money for the charity Paul Watts from Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service. Paul has supported the charity for over 20 years and today runs two talk shops that’s two at Royal Berkshire HQ, dedicating his own time to purchasing stock organising the shops sorting out all the money and in court encouraging his colleagues to support the charity. And last but not least, Kat Frost from Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service. Kat has taken part in a number of high-profile fundraising events for the charity including the London marathon in which she raised over five thousand pounds She was also an integral part of the team that produced the Fire Tones charity single in 2018 as well as that which organised the first charity ball to be held in Shropshire in 2018 And I am delighted to reveal that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Supporter of the Year Control Room Staff award is…waiting for the drum roll Linda Coughlan, huge congratulations Linda, hope you enjoy the award and enjoy what possibly socially restricted celebrations are allowed this year it is very well deserved and keep up the fantastic work Congratulations Linda. Next up we have a film with ex-RAF firefighter Mark Latham illustrating how the charity’s support extends beyond the fire and rescue services as well as how it supported him with his mental health My name is Mark Latham I’m a firefighter at the U.S Air Force base in RAF Croughton, Ex-Royal Air Force firefighter. With mental health in the firefighting environment we are exposed to things that we’re that will lead to mental ill health whether it’s in the job or outside the job the stigma years ago is dissolving but I think that people put a face on with mental health and with the face that they don’t want people to worry about them so you’ll come to work and with the firefighters we’re we are like a brotherhood we are very very close with the job that we do you don’t want people worrying about you it feels like you put in a brave face on things but then on your time off you can very very quickly deteriorate and go downhill and fall into a dark place As an RAF firefighter I didn’t even know I was entitled to use the services I’ve always known The Firefighters Charity was there but I didn’t believe that soon for the MOD as a firefighter I didn’t I wasn’t aware until I’d spoken to someone that used the services and that prompted me to get in touch with the charity. And the minute I got in touch you are then aware that someone has got your case for a long time I’d put it off because I didn’t think I was eligible or somebody did it more than me but the minute you’ve submitted your application someone’s on your case and they’re there to help you in any way you need so what I would say is please use the service sooner than later The award for Supporter of the Year Non-Uniform is up next and to present this one we have a

versatile TV and film actor who’s made us all laugh in the likes of W1A and Nativity and kept us on the edge of our seats in The Lost Honour of Christopher Jeffries as Harold Wilson in The Crown and most recently alongside David Tennant in Des over to you Jason Watkins Good evening everyone, I am delighted to be allowed to present the Spirit of Fire Non-Uniform Supporter of the Year award. I myself have been unsinged by fire I’m happy to say apart from in Greece on holiday, I fought a forest fire with my step-uncle on a small Greek island, a forest fire was about to engulf his farm so we managed along with some firefighters and some other helpers to save his farm involved cutting trenches and using a hose that were used for for the farming and also to avoid the seaplanes as they dropped the water on there on the fire and all I can say is remember the fire seemingly seemed to move very slowly but of course that seems slow but over time it’s very fast and it’s very frightening so my admiration is always constant whenever I hear of any incident involving fire so I’d like to commend everybody who’s watching on zoom tonight for all their work. I’m going to present the Non-Uniform Supporter of the Year and perhaps I mean I could say to you now that the closest relationship sometimes that one forms in my work is with the people that are not in front of the camera, even cameramen actually you can have great sort of relationships with the way that they work and also your dressers and makeup artists in fact you start your day with your makeup artist so there are lots of wonderful relations where they’re not necessarily seen by the public it’s up to us to take all the all the glory and the accolades if you like, but there’s so many people working behind the scenes on any project that one is involved with so I’m delighted to both announce the nominees and the winner So let’s go through the the nominees so the first nominee is Emma Satchell from Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service. Emma was one of the founding members of this service his hugely successful fundraising committee and leading on the organisation of events across the service she’s now chair of that committee and she organises charity balls, Santa’s grotto, open days bake sales raffles and more helping to raise almost £50,000 per year Lynn Twite from the Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service Lynn has organised three major Land Rover rally events for over the recent years to raise over £14,000 for the charity Now seeing how popular the four by fours were amongst firefighters at the King’s Lynn Fire Station where she works. She took it upon herself to organise the events in her spare time, as well as raising thousands she has also raised the profile of the charity across the whole service Helen Crick from the Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service as a car wash coordinator for the service Helen worked tirelessly to ensure that every single station in the service took part in the charity event she’s also gone on to organise two gun dogs scurries, events for gun dog owners that have raised well over £3,000 and now heads up Chester’s highly effective fundraising committee. And the last nominee is Robyn Hall from the Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service. Robyn is central to the services fundraising’s a success especially with the national car wash competition. She encourages stations to take part in a range of events and promotes the charity widely through communications across the service and to the public So those are the nominees and I’m delighted to reveal that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Non-Uniform Supporter of the year award is Emma Sasha

You’re probably all clapping now across Zoom. Congratulations Emma And what an amazing job you’ve done I think I think initiative is one of the biggest things that is so important and anyway congratulations and thank you so much for having me on what is a very very special night thank you Huge congratulations Emma well done. Our next film gives us an insight into the work of The Firefighters Charity’s Welfare Team as former firefighter Alistair McNab tells us how he was helped after hitting rock bottom My name’s Alistair McNab, I’ve been in Scottish Fire and Rescue for 28 years now. I’ve been battling depression over the years and the last three years I’ve started suffering with arthritis to the neck and the hips. After I’d went off sick after the six months I had to give up my flat financially wise so I was living in my summer house at the bottom of my mum’s garden. One day when I tried to take my own life going to work and that’s when I sought help from the Charity Initially it was to go to Penrith it was for psychological and physiotherapy side of things at that time I was in the summer house carried mentioned about going to the likes of the local housing and to see again getting a property. And I’d said at the time well if I got a property just now there’s no way I could afford to furnish it or anything like that, and that’s when it was suggested that they can help. I went back to work in the January and I got the property that’s when Carrie had sent like vouchers for Argos and Asda and they gave me a small amount of money for couch and stuff for the flat. It’s a wee bit sort of tearful but it’s more just thinking back as to how it could have been My grandson he can come around, it’s somewhere safe to be. Looking forward to it Because of the charity it helped me a get to a place where I was fit enough for work both physically and mentally I’d like to say that I went my full career or my full life without using it but I did I had to use it, and I couldn’t be any more thankful for that Presenting the next award for our Retired Supporter of the Year is a comedy actor perhaps most familiar to fans of The Fast Show as Dave Angel, eco warrior and competitive dad recently starring in BBC one sitcom King Gary it’s a pleasure to welcome Simon Day Good evening everybody I hope you’re well, my name is Simon Day. I was in The Fast Show many years ago and I’m very pleased tonight I’ve been asked to be part of The Firefighters Charity Spirit of Fire awards and I’ve been given the honour of announcing the winner of the Supporter of the Year Retired award they want me to give you an anecdote here about fire service all I can come up with is I knew a bloke in the 90s who worked in the office somewhere and they couldn’t fire him because the union was too strong. So that’s good on it okay here’s the nominees for the 2020 Spirit of Fire Retired Supporter of the Year, I was retired for a while myself here we go first of all Alan Gibson formerly of County Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Service Number two Joe Harkins now retired from Strathclyde and Scottish Fire and Rescue Services Number three Violet Davidson a former member of support staff for Scottish Fire and Rescue Service And last but not least Michelle Carter formerly of Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service so they’re the nominees and I’m delighted to say that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Retired Supporter of the Year is, your year, my year, this year, it’s been a terrible year not for this Lady Michelle Carter Well done Michelle I’m very pleased for you you’ve done a lot of keep fit and raised thousands and thousands of thousands of pounds you put every penny towards the charity

if you’ve got grandchildren they must be furious with you that’s the way it goes kids go and earn your own money. Anyway thanks very much indeed have a great night all of you, you lovely people, you know my mum was a nurse and we should sort all our services that’s all I’ve got to say good night Well done Michelle congratulations now during lockdown the importance of family has been brought home to us all and I think we’ve all held on a little bit tighter to those closest to us Our next film features Shona, Dave and their children and explores how the charity has helped them to spend valuable time together as a family Our daughter Isla who is five was born with complex medical problems we were told when she was born that they would they would get better but unfortunately things got worse and more problems cropped up. Isla is tube fed, she spends a lot of time in hospital she’s on a lot of medications she’s a wide range of complex problems and now we’ve got potential autism as well. I got to a point and I was in hospital where I didn’t give up but I couldn’t achieve supporting my family I couldn’t do everything for my family and I just, it was heartbreaking I didn’t want to turn to anyone I had nobody to turn to I couldn’t think of anyone friends or family that I could talk to And it was someone in the fire service they contacted The Firefighter Charity and gave them, told them what situation I was in, because I wouldn’t have phoned them myself I honestly wouldn’t have thought to phone The Firefighter’s Charity for help. The charity is for anybody related to a firefighter, it doesn’t matter if it’s not directly that firefighter was a partner or one of their children they are there for everybody they are there is for that family unit Firefighters do a really tough job and their unit and their family life will impact on their job so for the charity to to recognise that and support the family as a whole then impacts on firefighters doing their jobs and I think if someone does know somebody who is struggling, then even if it’s not directly that firefighter it is all right to seek that help And what does daddy do for a job? Firefighter! We’ve got four more inspirational young people up next as it’s time for our Young Supporter of the Year award. To present this one we welcome CBBC’s presenter Maddie Moate and BBC science expert Greg Foot Hello I’m Maddie and I’m Greg and we’re here today to announce the nominees and the winner of a very special award the Spirit of Fire Young Supporter of the Year award yeah this is for anyone who is aged 18 or under who has shown incredible support of The Firefighters Charity so it’s a real pleasure for us to be here to share this moment with you The nominees are eight-year-old Katie Keay from Scotland. Katie’s father is a volunteer for The Firefighters Charity and she has always followed in his footsteps giving up her time to support all kinds of fundraising events in all kinds of ways and always with bags of enthusiasm and energy. Next up we’ve got 17 year old Abbie Wishart from Durham Cadet Group. Abbie has been fundraising for the charity for five years helping out for open days before she became a cadet at 14. Since then she’s inspired other cadets to fundraise through a host of great events and has even completed the Junior Great North Run. Iur next nominee is 11-year-old Michael Bottomley from Leeds. After moving to a new secondary school Michael befriended firefighters at the station next door taking the biscuit and getting to know them he began to fundraise and has since organized auctions and raffles reaching out to local businesses to source prizes He’s also run a stall at his school’s Christmas fair and he raised well over £2000. Last up 13-year-old Tom Goodall from West Yorkshire Both Tom’s parents work for West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service and over the past seven years he has given up his free time to design posters and flyers to support fundraising events and has thrown his energy into car washes, bonfire nights galas car boot sales the lot. So we are delighted to reveal that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Young Supporter of the Year award is Michael Bottomley. Huge huge congratulations Michael nice one!

To all of you watching enjoy the rest of the awards ceremony bye A round of applause to you Michael really well done. It’s been a strange year and like a lot of charities, The Firefighters Charity has not been able to raise as much money this year as usual because so many of its traditional fundraising events like marathons and bike rides have been cancelled or postponed. So they’ve come up with a way for everyone to fundraise from home and stay safe. It’s called the Fire Family Challenge and it’s really simple. Basically whatever age you are and wherever you are in the country you can challenge yourself your family bubble your friends online or whoever else you want to do something special. It could be to see how many laps of the garden you can run in an hour or it could be a skipping challenge a painting crochet or knitting challenge, a sponsored dance off a family quiz an extreme haircut or an extreme makeup challenge It could be a 1000 piece jigsaw in a day, a keepy uppy challenge, a florist lava challenge, a garden obstacle course, a baked bean eating with a toothpick challenge, a sponsored silence, a nerf target challenge, a sponsored car wash or even a sponsored bedroom tidy the challenge, it is completely up to you. All you need to do is ask a grown-up to help you and go to The Firefighters Charity website at firefighterscharity.org.uk/firefamilychallenge to register your challenge. By taking part in the Fire Family Challenge and raising money you’ll be helping firefighters across the country to get help when they need it. Firefighting can be a very tough job and The Firefighters Charity exists to help firefighters who may be injured or who might need some support with how they’re feeling. So for every challenge you complete and every penny you raise you’ll help a firefighter to get the support they need so that they can get back to their jobs looking after us all when we have to dial 999 So good luck with your challenges and have fun Next we take a closer look at the important role that the charity’s corporate supporters play not only in helping to fundraise but in the case of Autoglym, helping to keep the nation’s cars clean during the charity’s annual car wash competition Autoglym is a 54-year-old-business based in the UK which manufactures its products for distribution around the globe. Its purpose is to make sure that people have the most effective products they can use to maintain their vehicles Autoglym likes to support The Firefighters Charity by providing product to all of their stations around the country so they can carry out their twice yearly charity car washes. We also provide support and information for the people doing the job to make sure they do the best job they can Autoglym chooses to support The Firefighters Charity from a whole variety of aspects I guess the most important one is that we’re very lucky that we don’t need to call on the emergency services on a regular basis but when we do we want to know that the people who are coming towards us are in the right frame of mind so from our perspective supporting a charity that supports the members of the firefighting service is absolutely the right thing to do. The winners of the firefighter competition which is to raise the most amount of money on an annual basis come with us to a British Touring Car Championship round and have a VIP experience so not only do we try and give them the tools but we try and give them the incentive as well to do a really good job. The activity around the car wash events is a wonderful engagement piece we can get our franchisees to go and visit all the fire stations and to work with them on a local basis it’s a great opportunity for the firefighters to engage with the the public so it seems to work for everyone So to announce the winner of the Spirit of Fire Corporate Supporter of the Year please welcome back chair of The firefighters Charities Board of Trustees Andrew Lynch Hello I’m Andrew Lynch Chair of The Firefighters Charity Board of Trustees and I’m delighted to announce the nominees for the Corporate Supporter of the Year Before I do so however, I’d just like to reiterate how important it is for us that organizations such as those nominated today get behind us help us to raise vital funds and help to raise awareness of the charity across their businesses and local communities Also by helping us they’re helping their local fire and rescue services and firefighters to get

the support they need which in turn also helps to keep the local communities in which their businesses operate safe. So like to think that the support of our corporate partners is a win-win for everyone. and the nominees for the Spirit of Fire Corporate Supporter of the Year award are the Ivy Spinningfields Manchester Fire ravaged the third floor of the newly opened restaurant in January 2019, but Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service crews stopped it spreading to the lower floors meaning it could open the next day. As a thank you, the Ivy held a relaunch event in aid of the charity and raised £47, 000 D Robinson & Co Limited. The leading textile recycling partner for the charity D Robinson & Co have generated well over a staggering £4 million over 11 years through the management of a nationwide consortium of reset cycling partners. That’s a huge amount of the nation’s unwanted clothing also saved from landfill. The Co-op, Danny Howarth and Shane Reeves  On-call firefighter Shane works for both Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service and the Co-op. First choosing The Firefighters Charity as Charity of the Year at his own store, Shane went on to work with Regional Operations Manager Danny Howarth to persuade 29 other managers to follow suit Together the Co-op stores have since raised over £45,000 for the charity Asprey a national insurance loss assessor company Asprey is familiar with the devastation that can be left following a fire keen to give something back to the firefighters who work in those situations, the company has agreed a two-year partnership with the charity and run a host of fundraising events from firefighter experience days to raffles, auctions, car washes and marathons And I’m delighted to reveal that the winners of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Corporate Supporter of the Year award are the Co-op Danny Howarth and Shane Reeves And many many congratulations to you both thank you very much The Firefighters Charity employs almost 200 people all of whom do all they can to support the fire services community in their roles, however some of its employees also go that little bit further and become volunteer fundraisers themselves So our next award is a Special Recognition Award for Volunteer Fundraising by an Employee, and to introduce this one I’m delighted to welcome Gogglebox regular, BBC Radio 2 presenter, journalist and Church of England Minister, the Reverend Kate Botley Hello. I’m the Reverend Kate Botley and I am so happy to be a part of this fantastic evening of celebration and to be given the honour of announcing the winner of a Special Recognition Award for The Fire Fighters Charity’s Employee of the Year. The winner of tonight’s special recognition award and I’ve been given some amazing background information on the recipient to paint a beautiful picture of exactly why he’s been chosen our winner has worked for the charity for 12 and a half years and since 2015 he’s completed 20 challenges to raise money for the charity all in full fire kit including breathing apparatus these have included climbing Ben Nevis and Snowdon three half marathons, one full marathon and a 75 mile point-to-point run over three days I’m exhausted just reading it he did all this under the anonymous persona of ‘The Flame’, his face hidden behind a mirrored visor like a superhero As well as raising almost six and a half thousand pounds The Flame raised awareness of the charity at every step with numerous press articles bringing the charity to the attention of a new audience. His colleagues across the charity had no idea it was him taking part in the challenges and raising the money until he completed them all and revealed his secret identity just like a superhero. Described by his colleagues as selfless modest and dedicated with a wicked sense of humour and penchant for Dad jokes our winner is passionate about doing whatever he can in his role and in his spare time to support the fire services community. So I am absolutely delighted to announce that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Special Recognition Award for Employee of the Year is of course, Mr Kevin ‘The Flame’ Biles. Congratulations Kev

you’re amazing, you make me exhausted just reading this I hope you’re delighted with your well-deserved award and celebrate in style. Much love Congratulations Kev or should I say The Flame? The charity’s Nursing Team at its Jubilee House centre was awarded an outstanding rating by the care quality commission earlier this year so our next film takes a look at the incredible work that they do The Nursing Team’s based at Jubilee House and we provide a 24-hour nursing service for our beneficiaries who need nursing support. Any of our beneficiaries who need any assistance with their personal care for example so showering, washing, dressing we can provide support with medication we can provide support with mobility that might be with wheelchairs or using hoists I’m Nina and I’m here at Jubilee House because I had an accident I’ve come here to gain a bit of confidence and strengthen my leg. I’ve done lots in the hydro pool and in an anti-gravity walker which is fantastic because I could leave my crutches and walk You were able to come and watch me do that weren’t you? Yeah a fantastic experience especially for me that’s the first time in a year. I was struggling to hold it together because she’s I can see her walking and the smile on the face. It’s shown me that my leg is stronger than I think it is so I’m much more confident now that it’s not going to collapse under me In 2014 I had a stroke and I lost the use of my left side. That’s what the staff do here, they come down, just before you have your meal in evening or morning and they’ll get you your medication out and it’s the hardest hardest week you can think to have because you’re so involved from day one You never stop getting you’re involved because but the staff the staff are fantastic So I think it’s important that the charity has a nursing provision and because there are so many of our beneficiaries with complex needs beneficiaries with long-term conditions, beneficiaries with life-changing injuries and without the nursing provision here up at Jubilee House, those beneficiaries wouldn’t be able to access the fantastic services that we offer Now our next award is for Dependent Supporter of the Year. And it gives me great pleasure to introduce you to our second game of the evening, a British institution and winner of four BAFTAS, two British Academy Film Awards, two Emmys, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA fellowship She’s captured our hearts in Educating Rita, Billy Elliot, Calendar Girls, Harry Potter, Paddington and countless other movies and tv shows. Ladies and Gentlemen, Dame Julie Walters Hello everybody. I was so delighted to be asked by The Firefighters Charity to be here this evening to announce the nominees and of course the winner of The Spirit of Fire Supporter of the Year Dependent award. So here we go with the nominees Shona Melon partner to Dave Shaw, a firefighter with West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service Julie Munro married to a London Fire Brigade Group Manager Louise Moody partnered to Crew Commander Josh Matthews of Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service Laura Moore, married to Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service Crew Manager Ian Moore And I’m delighted to announce, that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Supporter of the Year, Dependent award, goes to, a bit of a drum roll everybody wait for it. The winner is Louise Moody, go gal fantastic! And congratulations Louise well done to you

Next up the charity wouldn’t be able to function without the tireless support of its volunteers An army of dedicated individuals across the UK who routinely do all they can to fundraise and raise awareness as our next film from Christmas last year shows It first started six years ago where we’ve done the car washes we’ve done the charity curry nights, we’ve done my car boot sales we just wanted something different but we couldn’t put a finger on what to do and then one day we’re in the canteen having a dinner and we’re just talking where we’re going this weekend and one of the lads said well he’s going to Birmingham Christmas market, somebody else is going to Liverpool Christmas market, somebody else is going to Manchester and all of a sudden we thought well we’re all going to Christmas markets and other towns why don’t people come to the Stokey Christmas market and the reason people don’t come to the Stokey Christmas market is because we haven’t got one. So it starts as a bit of a joke, and it’s just grown grown and grown and people come here today warrant that we worry right So it’s just one of these ludicrous ideas what has come really good for us, and raising a considerable amount of money for The Firefighters Charity So without volunteers we would just not be able to get the kind of reach that we do we don’t get that local intelligence which enables us to put on good events, so we couldn’t work without them Today’s event is an event that’s on the calendar every year, it’s really well attended takes months and months of planning so massive thank you to Kelvin and his team The firefighters are here to support local community and with The Firefighters Charity support the firefighter will help the local community so it’s a great big ball really one charity helps other ones and if one of that segment is removed the ball doesn’t bounce as good Merry Christmas! As we saw in that last film the public play an important role in helping to fundraise for the charity and our next award for Public Supporter of the year recognises those members of the public who have done something extraordinary for The Firefighters Charity To present it it’s fantastic to welcome someone who does something extraordinary herself every morning when she shares a desk with Piers Morgan, it’s Good Morning Britain presenter Susanna Reid Hello everybody it’s great to be with you for The Fire Fighters Charity’s Spirit of Fire awards. And to have been asked to announce the nominees and very deserving winner for the Public Supporter of the Year award so the nominees for the 2020 Spirit of Fire Public Supporter of the Year award are, Carol Lord from Greater Manchester, who passionately promotes positive mental health amongst the fire community and who swam the 22 mile length of Loch Lomond in 19 hours and 32 minutes to raise almost £3,000 Mary Naugher-Kennedy from Northern Ireland Mary tragically lost her 18 year old son Shane following a road traffic collision in 2009 However she has never forgotten the actions of firefighters at the scene that day and last year organised a five kilometer fun run event which raised £8,665 for The Firefighters Charity Emma Hughes from Greater Manchester whose father was a firefighter has been a tireless supporter of the charity raising money and promoting its work by running a community group for newly retired fire and rescue service personnel. And Joanne Stovell from Derbyshire, an incredible ambassador who has pledged to leave half her estate to the charity as a thank you for the support it gave to her father Bob, following a motorbike crash which tragically killed her mother Well all phenomenal individuals the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Public Supporter of the Year award is, Emma Hughes Emma huge congratulations you’re absolutely marvellous Congratulations Emma. In our next film we meet retired firefighter Brian from South Wales, who’s found a new form of friendship through a local living well group set up by the charity an initiative that sees similar groups meeting in person and virtually across the UK I joined the fire service September 1st 1965 served in a number of stations and finally

retired 2nd December 1993. The fire service was like a family everybody was together it bonded friendship unfortunately my wife passed away this year on March 6th, very suddenly They put it down to cardiac arrest in the home I found her myself. You get you you know your good moments and your bad moments Our living well groups are in new initiatives where we go out into the community and basically reconnect with our retired beneficiaries who maybe don’t have any contact with us or with the fire and rescue service anymore. The main idea is that they come and have a lovely chat and they make new friends and they reconnect with old friends but also that they learn about what’s going on in their community they learn about what the charity can do for them. The group that’s there today in Aberdare, I knew quite all them quite well I actually worked with quite a lot of them they keep in touch and you were you’re looking after each other in many ways in in such that saying well you’re getting all right Brian, yes and I’m okay thank you. It’s a good get together, we look forward to every month The next award of the evening celebrates the incredible bravery and courage that many of our beneficiaries show when facing life-changing personal adversity presenting the Beneficiary of Courage award a versatile tv and radio presenter who is as much at home presenting Crufts as she is presenting the Olympics, Paralympics and Royal Ascot Ladies and Gentlemen, Clare Balding Hi everyone. it’s Clare Balding here and I’m  just delighted to be able to join you at The Firefighters Charity’s Spirit of Fire Awards And indeed to present this Special Beneficiary of Courage award now I know a few of you individually but specifically I do know one of your dogs because that’s sherlock on the back of my book heroic animals because I wanted to pay tribute to the dogs that work within the fire service finding accelerants working out whether a fire has been deliberately started or not But this award is not about animals it’s about people and so many of you all of you give more than just your time, you give your lives, you give your commitments, you give your passion, your energy towards your jobs, and you make such a difference to those around you not just those that you may be saving from afar comforting after a fire but also to your teammates to your colleagues And having read through the nominations for this award I’m so impressed and moved and touched, by what you have faced and what you have come through so congratulations to an inspirational group of nominees and I’m delighted to tell you about those nominees so these are those who’ve made the shortlist for the Spirit of Fire Beneficiary of Courage award First up we have Alistair McNab, from Scottish Fire and Rescue Suffering with chronic pain Alistair’s mental health declined to the point where he tried to take his own life. After also becoming homeless he reached out for help And today with the charities support he has turned his life around moving into a new home last year Bob Stovell, formerly of Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service. Nine years ago Bob was involved in a catastrophic motorbike accident that killed his wife and left him fighting for his own life, literally pieced back together by surgeons he has defied the odds to walk again, and has been supported regularly by the charity in his extraordinary rehabilitation And finally Paul Weller formerly of West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service. Paul had to be talked down from Beachy Head by police after his life as he saw it had hit rock bottom. However he bravely sought psychological support from the charity and today he is a dedicated fundraiser and advocate encouraging others to recognise their own mental health needs. Three incredible individuals who have all overcome so much and I’d like to pay them all tribute and and thank them for everything that they have done really difficult to pick a winner from those three But the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Beneficiary of Courage award is Bob Stovell Bob many congratulations I just know from from reading the nomination reason and some of

the background to your story how much you have overcome since that motorbike accident nine years ago. And how brave you’ve been and I just want to personally pay tribute to your courage and to thank you for all the hope I think you give others and for everything that that you have fought through and it takes an awful lot, it takes an awful lot to get to the position that you are in now. So you know that is true bravery that is true heroism so thank you and congratulations As we’ve been hearing all evening the charity supporters have undertaken some incredible feats to raise money and awareness Our next film therefore illustrates just how far and how high those in the fire services community are prepared to go in regards to raising as much as they can for The Firefighters Charity Namaste So my team highlight is that fourteen firefighters set out to get to Everest Base Camp to raise as much money as we could we didn’t put a total on it for The Firefighters Charity, and the team achieved that. For me, my personal highlight was the whole team getting there. We set off being told by our tour guides that two maybe three may not make it just due to the altitude how punishing it was going to be on our bodies We’ve raised around £20,000 for The Firefighters Charity, we all know people who have suffered in the fire service from either mental illness or physical illness or the dependents of family. So if we can do that little bit to help someone to make that life that little bit better that I think is the driving factor for every one of us you have a look around you and it’s about the men next to you just keep going as one strong team one strong unit Having that sort of goal in mind that we’re raising money for the charity as well gave us a good push so that we could get there get the banner to base camp and get the photo that we needed to get I’ve been a watch manager for 17 years now and I’ve seen the benefits of The Firefighters Charity, so there are definitely firefighters on my watch and past watches that wouldn’t be employed in the fire service, and definitely wouldn’t be back on duty as quick as they did without the support from The Firefighters Charity And you never know it could be you could be me one day, so it’s almost an insurance policy as well help your friends look after your colleagues Challenges like climbing Everest inevitably require teamwork and our next award for Team of the Year recognises exactly that. To present it we welcome our furthest flung presenter of the evening all the way from Melbourne Australia, it’s comedian and presenter of Channel 4’s The Last Leg, Adam Hills Hello from Melbourne Australia, where we have gone into a second lockdown Or as I like to call it lockdown two deja flu. I’m Adam Hills and I’m genuinely chuffed to be presenting this award this one is the 2020 Spirit of Fire Team of the Year award Now being Australian, we have a very close relationship with the fire brigades, especially in bushfire season but for me I have a different relationship because many years ago when I started out in comedy I used to have a little routine on stage where I would bring someone out of the crowd get them up on stage get them to yell their name to the audience so they felt like a bit of a rock star and the audience would yell their names back. And one year I grabbed this guy out of the out of the audience and he was a fireman. And so I said well you deserve a round of applause more than most I want you to shout your name and the audience will shout it back for some reason this guy thought my idea wasn’t funny enough so he yelled the phrase ‘Go you big red fire engine’ , and the audience shouted it back and then he kept shouting it and they kept shouting it and kind of became a catchphrase for the show. At the end of that particular show I said right I’m gonna call my next show Go You Big Red Fire Engine, which I did and then it became my catchphrase and it was quoted in Australian parliament it was printed in newspapers around the world, people still shouted at me on the street. So I then used go Go You Big Red Fire Engine a couple of times to raise money for various fire services around the world so it’s kind of weirdly become my thing so in the spirit of go you big red fire engine let’s get on to these awards which as I said are the 2020 Spirit of Fire Team of the Year awards. Now the nominees are number one, Team Noble Scottish Fire and Rescue, now they’re otherwise known as Chris and Blair Elliot The brothers took part in an epic 3000 mile 55-day endurance rowing race across the Atlantic Ocean to raise money for the charity in memory of Chris’s colleague at Scottish Fire and Rescue,

John Noble. It’s an incredible effort. The Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service Fundraising Committee Now in just a few years the committee has through sheer hard work and dedication transformed Merseyside in one into one of the most effective and well-run fundraising and awareness raising services in the UK. The next nominee is A21 run for Grenfell Paddington Red Watch London Fire Brigade. The 2018 London Marathon was one of the hottest on record but Paddington Red Watch ran it in full kit including breathing apparatus to raise over £52,000 for the charity And your final nominee Littleport Fire Station in Cambridgeshire, which has been fundraising for the charity for the last 40 years crews have gone to extraordinary lengths supported by the local community to organise numerous events each year This is a feat all the more remarkable given that Littleport is a retained station so those are the nominees. I am all dressed up in my finest although I am wearing tracksuit pants. The winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Team of the Year award is The Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service Fundraising Committee. Congratulations enjoy whatever virtual party you are having. And genuinely absolutely chuffed to have been a part of this Well done Merseyside congratulations to you all and as you’ve just shown us a close relationship between fire and rescue services and The Firefighters Charity is vital to both ensuring those who work for our fire and rescue services know how the charity can help them and encouraging those same people to donate and fundraise Our next film looks at this a little closer From the time they join the fire rescue service they are beneficiaries if they are within the fire rescue service for five years and then they are lifetime beneficiaries as are their dependents lifetime beneficiaries so it’s a really good offer and it is unique You know the work the charity does absolutely supports fire and rescue services and the staff it enables us to be able to provide a different type of support and care and for people in some of the difficult times in their life. Certainly the firefighters charity particularly with rehabilitation gives some superb treatment and care to be able to get people back in the workplace at an earlier point that coupled with occupational health management physiotherapy or psychological therapies that are offered in-house and gives that great balance. One thing I would say about the charity is that it exists in that middle ground so for some people who may be having difficulties in the workplace and may not be able to access health through the national health service at a speedy enough rate The charity is able to offer you know a swift and very effective intervention It’s really important that Bedfordshire Fire and Rescue Service has a strong relationship with The Firefighters Charity, and that’s for a number of different reasons Primarily of course the charity provides important support services to our firefighters which is part of their welfare and that’s very very important to me Also of course it helps them to recover more quickly which means they’re back to work more quickly which is also better for our service but I think the activities that firefighters undertake in order to support their colleagues that need that help through fundraising and all sorts of charitable events I think is quite good for the motivation and morale of the service as well After that it seems only fitting to move on to our next award, Supporter of the Year Fire and Rescue Service. And to announce this one I’m honoured to introduce a true rock and roll legend a singer songwriter legendary guitar player and astrophysicist, he is of course best known for being one quarter of Queen it’s over to you, Mr Brian May Hi folks. I’m Brian May on behalf of The Firefighters Charity this is the Spirit of Fire award for The Fire and Rescue of the Year Now I had occasion to meet some of the firefighters in a very particular situation where my own life and property was threatened and it was a very inspiring meeting up on the golf course Sunnydale and if the wind had been different and the situation had been just a little different my whole life would have gone up in flames. So I owe a huge amount to the wonderful firefighters who worked night and day in much longer shifts than they should have been called on to work

to keep all our lives and properties safe and also to save a lot of wild animals. So it gives me particular pleasure to present this award. The nominees for the Spirit of Fire award for The Fire and Rescue Service of the Year are, the London Fire Brigade. The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service The Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service The Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service And the winners of the Spirit of Fire award for The Fire and Rescue Service of the Year are The Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service. It gives me great pleasure to offer my congratulations to you guys you do a wonderful job and not many people realise what an incredible commitment your life is So I will be continuing to campaign for a little bit more recognition and a little bit more help in so many ways from the community for the work that you do congratulations Congratulations Lancashire lads we love you. Lancaster lads and lasses I should say. God bless you! Congratulations Lancashire. And now following her well-deserved Special Recognition Award for Excellence in the Field of Mental Health, our next film features London Fire Brigade’s, Shilla Patel talking about her own mental health struggles and how time with the charity helped I’m very proud to be in the London Fire Brigade. I’ve been here for 15 years and I can’t see myself working anywhere else. What I enjoy is the the family approach, we all support each other. I want to work in a job that where you are making a difference, and working with the community engaging with London and diverse communities So in terms of my own mental health, I’ve lived with anxiety and depression pretty much all my life And for for many years I said I’ve been here 15 years for 14 of those years I was never open about my own mental health and even as inclusion manager I was telling other people they needed to be brave they needed to be open and honest, but I continued to wear my many different masks up until I met The Firefighters Charity and then I became a lot more open about my own mental health, and was able to be open and honest. And I think one of the things that led to that was our own commissioner Dany Cotton being open about her mental health after the the Grenfell incident And it inspired me and empowered me to to have a voice and talk about my own mental health I was very surprised actually how easy the application process was to call The Firefighters Charity I spoke to a counsellor, we had a chat for about half an hour about some of my issues and problems how it was impacting on my my work life and my personal life. They rang me back and said we’ve got a place for you I expected it to take a few weeks maybe a month but it was very very quick The contrast between Devon and London is is huge, and it’s it for me it’s it’s the pieces the serenity it’s the beautiful landscapes the wildlife and just being able to jump off at the side of the world and take some time out for yourself which is really key And I’d encourage anybody to do exactly the same Our penultimate award of the evening is for Supporter of the Year, Firefighter And as its name suggests it recognises individual firefighters who have gone over and above the call of duty in their support of The Firefighters Charity. To present it we welcome a legend of the beautiful game who grew up on the Grenfell Tower estate in West London and in 2017 organised a charity match to support families affected by the fire. Former Spurs, Newcastle United, West Ham, QPR and England striker and now director of football at QPR, it is of course Les Ferdinand First and foremost I want to thank all the firefighters out there for the incredible work they do for this nation, we as a club saw it at great lengths and close to hand when we had the Grenfell fire, which is in our community and um we saw how diligent and how professional that these guys went to work and what they did and it was really touching for us as a club as a community and you know I say a club of community but as a nation to see our firefighters come and

do what they did and I know the impact it had on them a load of the firefighters who you know had to go and for mental health issues and stuff like that after witnessing what they’d witnessed sometimes we see these people go to work and do do their job and probably not get the recognition they deserve at times and you know it was great for us to to see them do what they did and you know we managed to put on a game for Grenfell at the time and which was an important time for the community and I think there’s not a person who came to the game and you know it was one of the first times being at Loftus Road that we had a full house, so I remember it well and I think on the day it was fantastic and we had a load of celebrities and so called stars put their name to wanting to play and they turned up but I think there wasn’t a person in the house that on the day that when the firefighters took to the field and and took part in the game everybody on in the stadium stood up and applauded them because it just we just wanted to show how grateful we were to what they do and how they do it and and what they did for us on that on on that occasion Here are the nominees for the award David Millward from Scottish Fire and Rescue Services who has raised thousands for charity within a small community in the West Highlands of Scotland after receiving support himself following a spinal injury 18 years ago Sam Pick from Norfolk fire service who has run a car wash long distance cycling event car boot sale, Land Rover events and countless others over 20 years raising huge sums in the process and helping many to access support for the charity Chris Birdsell-Jones from Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service who masterminded The Fire Tones bid for the Christmas number one in 2018 with their version of ‘Do They Know It’s Christmas’ Tirelessly promoting a single on tv and radio Chris helped raise thousands and increase the awareness of the charity amongst the public Robbie Sturrock from Scottish Fire and Rescue Services, who has led fundraising efforts at Peterhead Fire Station for 20 years organising countless successful challenge events car washes, summer fates and Santa sleighs as well as driving their recycling efforts and bringing the community together All incredibly deserving individuals but unfortunately can only be one winner Chris Birdsell-Jones, congratulations and well done So would you believe it we’ve reached our last award of the evening and as has become tradition, we end with this our Lifetime Achievement Award which goes to someone who has dedicated over 30 years to supporting The Firefighters Charity To conclude presenting duties and announce our very worthy winner I’m over the moon to introduce a staged tv and film actor who as a prodigiously talented character actor has played everyone from Tony Blair, David Frost and Brian Clough to Kenneth Williams and most recently Chris Tarrant. A political activist, charity champion and proud Welshman here’s Michael Sheen to tell us more about the 2020 Spirit of Fire Lifetime Achievement Winner Good evening I am delighted to join you tonight and to have been asked to present the Spirit of Fire Lifetime Achievement Award. I’ve been doing a little bit of homework on the winner of this award and before we see a film featuring those who know him best i can give you a few clues as to our very deserving recipient Firstly he was a firefighter for 30 years throughout which time he was always involved in supporting The Firefighters Charity He retired 15 years ago but never let up on his fundraising work for the charity and in fact over that time has been central to raising around £200,000. He knows a fair bit about fireworks helping to arrange countless bonfire night events raising money and helping to keep his local community safe in the process He has helped countless colleagues and peers to access support from the charity. And has inspired just as many to also get involved in fundraising He even raised over £1800 for the charity at his own 70th birthday party So here with a bit more of an insight into our very worthy winner are a few of those who know him best Hi we’re at Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Services headquarters today, doing some secret filming on behalf of Harry Binyan, who’s actually in the building today but doesn’t know this is going on behind the scenes

Harry does absolutely everything for the charity, every single event that we organise as a service he’s there he’s part of the organising committee he’ll be first there on the morning he’ll be last there at night setting up pretty much everything we do is the biggest supporter that we have across the whole of the service Harry has been a real tremendous support to me in my role at The Firefighters Charity he helps with everything He comes to every event he raises masses of money for example instead of having a birthday party he decided to have a charity fundraiser where he raised money for The Firefighters Charity We had a big raffle and I think they raised about £2,000 for his birthday, with all the help of his friend Alan and the other firemen The two of us together perform at every open day, every event, we never miss any, and we supply everything for the stations to function really. I guess we’re the quartermasters for the charity and the service. I first met Harry number years ago at fire station open day, because I’ve always wanted to be in the fire service and got chatting to him and he’s since then he’s motivated me and inspired me to get involved with a charity I think he’s always  been passionate about it and think he’s trying to get the new the newer generation to understand why we need to keep going, why the next generation of firefighters need to do exactly what Harry’s doing I learned a lot from Harry from you know hearing stories when he’s been at open days about how it used to be and it also made me enjoy the job more because you get the sense of the fire service as a family and I love being a part of that We speak to every apprentices course, we speak every recruits course, and Harry’s always there leading from the front we tend to facilitate so if there’s a banner needed Harry thinks nothing are going 30, 40 mile to pick up a banner to pick up a bucket for somebody and being firefighters and being in the service it’s always the last minute, so sometimes he gets an hour’s notice to get a banner 20 mile away Harry now books his holidays around The Firefighters Charity event so this year his wife’s really relieved because she’s been able to have him for a little bit longer to do things because we’ve had to stop some of the fundraising this year. But Harry being Harry hasn’t let it stop him he’s having a party to celebrate his BEM, I’m sure he’ll have a raffle going on behind the scenes and guess where that money’s going yes The Firefighter’s Charity I don’t know he’s just a stubborn old so-and-so, and that’s why he wants to do it he’s always wanted to do it so, right away from starting the Fire Brigade they’ve always been a family together and that’s what they wanted to do I owe a lot to Harry and you know he’s supported encouraged me throughout the recruitment process and throughout my career as a retained firefighter and four years on now and he’s still doing that I really can’t think of anyone better to get the Lifetime Achievement Award than Harry Binyan. He has absolutely spent his whole life, his whole fire service life and being involved with the charity raising money doing everything he possibly can, he’s just such a deserving member to receive that award So I’m absolutely delighted to announce that the winner of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Lifetime Achievement Award is former County Durham and Darlington firefighter and present-day fundraising goliath Harry Binyon. Harry you are genuinely a hero that is a life well-lived many many congratulations to you That’s it we’ve come to the end of the 2020 Spirit of Fire Awards but before we go on behalf of everyone at the charity I’d like to thank all of tonight’s incredible presenters and congratulate all of our amazing nominees and winners indeed I’d also like to congratulate all of the hundreds of nominees who just missed out on the shortlists as well as the thousands who may not have been nominated but who nevertheless deserve congratulating for their dedication and support. The Firefighters Charity is only here today because of the generosity of the fire services community, and the ability of its members to take action individually and come together collectively to ensure its doors remain open. So thank you for having me it’s been an absolute pleasure to be your host Spirit of Fire will return soon but until then here’s a little reminder as to all that you’ve achieved and why it matters so much. Good night

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UAB State of the University Address

Welcome everyone

It’s a pleasure to have the opportunity to provide this encore and updated State of

the University presentation And in particular, we wanted to make it as broadly available as possible so we’re live streaming it today for those to watch on their computers and on their mobile devices and truly 2016 has been a record year a groundbreaking year for UAB Every part of our mission is thriving, really like never before Our educational programs, our enrollment is at its largest ever Our serve funding has increased dramatically over the past two to three years after the economic downturn Our faculty is working hard, being very successful We’ve seen more patients this year than ever in our health system Over a million and a half patients, saved more lives, helped more families than ever before Our community service is broader and deeper here at home and our local community across the state, across the nation and on every continent around the world We have faculty and students working and learning And we continue to have a very powerful impact on economical development of Birmingham of Alabama and America And our innovation district initiative partnership with the Birmingham Business Alliance, the city of Birmingham, Jefferson County Our major corporations, Alabama Power, Regions, McWane, Community Foundation and others is going to set the stage for a transformational next one to two to three years around innovation in Birmingham We’ve got a tremendous campus master plan We’re going to build four new buildings over the next three years along with a lot of other facilities and projects we’ll talk about We’re almost to 20,000 students this year 19,535 Largest freshman class ever Very talented academically Largest honors college classes ever and this is all a result of great teamwork by our terrific people The provost office and enrollment management team, lead by Bradley Barnes, but that’s really been in concert with all of the deans and faculty and leaders across all of our schools in the college of arts and sciences This video will provide a highlight: UAB ushers in a groundbreaking fall semester, with its largest freshman class ever and a record year for recruitment and retention UAB’s total enrollments numbers reflect incredible growth on campus, with 19,535 students, an increase of 6.5% Vice Provost for enrollment management, Bradley Barnes, says, “This growth is a testament to hard work and an aggressive recruitment strategy.” We put a variety of programs in place to help gets us to this mark

Including adding additional recruiters out of state We added one in California, Texas, Tennessee and Georgia to give us a total of five including our Illinois recruiter That attributed to about a 13.7% growth in out of state enrollment We also saw sizeable growth in international students as well UAB welcomed its largest freshman class ever with 2,021 first time students Scores remained consistent with last years record high achieving freshman class with an average ACT 24.9 and a GPA of 3.65 Five hundred of those students were accepted into UAB’s Honors College Barnes says growing a campus and maintaining quality is most rewarding, but he’s most pleased with the uptick in UAB’s retention numbers Our increase in retention is probably one of the most exciting things that has come out of this past year It’s an institutional priority It’s important to the university It’s important to me Retention is tied to so many things It’s tied to enrollment It’s also tied to graduation rates So to be able to increase first-time freshman retention by more than 3% is quite a feat and all of campus should be really pleased with that number This record-breaking enrollment comes on the heels of exciting new additions to campus and student services Last fall we opened a new residence hall; in the spring we opened the new student center The state of the art practice facility for athletics this summer, this fall we break ground on the new school of business and a new school of nursing That level of excitement will continue to produce momentum on this campus With its diverse student population, unique programs, world-renowned faculty and opportunities for student to be engaged in like never before UAB’s moment is contagious and its impact reaches far beyond its backyard We’re going to break records this year in every aspect of our mission Our student enrollment, our research is over five hundred million dollars a year and growing, we’re treating more patients and saving more lives than ever We’re having a tremendous impact on our community We’re driving economic prosperity in Birmingham Amazingly, our honors college has doubled in enrollment over the past four years Dean Shannon Blanton and our leaders of the honors program The science and technology program, and our experiential learning and global learning communities are doing a fabulous job of providing our students with unique experiences And you can see the tremendous growth in these curves We’re excited about growing our international student population We already have a strong international population, from over sixty countries But through our partnership with N2 International, we plan to grow that and offer student from around the world opportunity to come here and attain a world-class undergraduate education And by so doing, enrich our student body and give our students exposure to many cultures and people from different backgrounds and to make friendships and collaborations around the world Many of the global collaborations we have now are because students or trainees or scientists or physicians came from elsewhere to here and went back to their home countries and we established strong partnerships and research programs together We are also working closely with our two-year community colleges, in particular Jefferson State, the largest We just sign a reciprocal credit hour recognition agreement with them, so any class taken there will be credited here, same ours there And we created two new full tuition scholarships for students who successfully complete their two-year associates degree and come to UAB As you saw, there’s really growth across every aspect of the university All of our schools and colleges and you can see that all are in the six to eight percent growth range Public health has grown so much because of the undergraduate program and its tremendous growth Honors College, you can see, just in this year 24% increase in credit hour production

The graduate school, our masters programs particularity, are growing rapidly We have capacity because we had built capacity and with the three new academic buildings, we will be completing over the next two to three years, along with our new genomic medicine and data sciences research building, we have capacity for more students We continue to innovate around majors that we can uniquely provide because we have a world-class comprehensive university A health science center and world-class college of arts and sciences, engineering, business, and the other health sciences And you see the newest majors, just recently approved A bachelor of science in Immunology, B.S in Human Resource Management, a growing area of need, B.A. in Computer and Information Sciences, that’s for those who want to be computer scientists but are not calculus whizzes who might do the B.S., and this is a growing area of interest which is why we developed that A Masters of Social Work and a Doctorate of Nursing Practice which is now specific to our nursing school at our campus New majors in the works and plans: Bioinformatics, information science around large biological datasets, like genomic datasets Digital Forensics, ever more important, Genetics and Genomic Sciences, and perhaps the first undergraduate degree in Cancer Biology in the nation Our undergraduates have unparalleled opportunities to interface with our world-class faculty and do research early in their tenure, not just as juniors or seniors Our research expos where they present their work in front of others The faculty, the students, our community are expanding You can see the numbers We have had to expand from one day to two days and we now have a spring and summer and fall expo Our students continue to break records in winning national, international scholarships and fellowships and other recognitions Road scholarships: Marshal, Goldwater, and Boren And a growing number of Clinton Global Initiative university opportunities Our graduate programs continue to rank highly nationally You can see there across a spectrum of disciplines how well they are doing They are continuing to grow Our talented marketing team, communications team and our new digital marketing team have put together a campaign and they are working hard to share through the digital formats our young people of today are more familiar with than television ads or billboards And you’ll see in just a moment one of those that they adapted for YouTube But our efforts are across the nation now and we are working hard to make sure we are available, even on their iPhone or smartphone Choosing a college can be tough Classic or Modern? Big game or big sound? Close to home or a doorway to the world? Choose A and B, choose UAB That’s produced by our students Rosey O’Burn is here who leads that group They chose the music, they chose the visuals, they chose the wording and it’s a rapping BAM BAM fifteen second tell you about UAB and hopefully capture your attention I’m sure it will We also have a world-class, beautiful, new, fifty million dollar student center, which has everything imaginable Our folks who programmed and planned that for several years did an exceptional job Everything a student could need outside the classroom is there Our One Stop, our advising, our various organizations, student affairs, dining, BBQ, Asian noodles, Panera Bread The faculty go in there more and more for lunch It’s a great environment It has really just been a tremendous success It’s also a beautiful extension of our campus green with the green space that’s in front of the student center Our in house team has produced a great new video that shows a tour of the center

We now have a new Dragon Wagon for welcoming new prospective students and their families for tour around campus We are going to break ground on more facilities over the next few years than we have in a very long time, perhaps ever Our new Football Operations Center, Legacy Pavilion, is already broken ground on It’s already coming out of the ground It’s going great and it’s going to be ready by next summer We just broke ground on our School of Nursing building, which will be on top of the current site for our School of Nursing building It’s going to be a world-class, 21st century educational building with a lot of space for simulations and modern training Collat School of Business, which will also have the Harvard Institute for Innovations in Entrepreneurship We’re going to break ground on that in December 2016 It’s going to be a beautiful world-class building right in University Blvd., between 13th and 12th street We are in the planning stages and already saw the architectural drawings for the new College of Arts and Sciences building, which will be on the southwest corner of the campus green It’ll be a reflection of Heritage Hall It has been termed Heritage Hall II for now, but I’m sure we’ll come up with an even better name We plan to break ground on that sometime in 2017 Our first research building in a number of years, will be a new world-class genomic medicine and data sciences research building on the corner of 18th street and between 8th Ave and 9th Ave, beside the school of health professions and across the street from Shelby and our other research buildings We just met today with some of our housing consultants, who are putting together a master plan for student housing We just opened that new freshman residents hall a year ago, 714 beds were full and over subscribed by about 100 students this fall and we already know we need additional housing and are planning for that through this study for not just now, over the next one to two to three years, but over the next five years and beyond The McCallum Research Building is our largest research building We are beginning a comprehensive renovation of it in phases because it is so big and contains so many of our laboratory researchers We are going to accomplish that over the next three years or so We’re going to transform that building into to equivalent of a brand new research building We are also beginning plans for renovation of Campbell Hall, which is both educational space along with research and educational laboratory space in the College of Art and Sciences We will be initiating the plans in the coming year Sterne Library We continue to make investments in not only the content, but in the space We created a Maker’s Space with the collaboration of students and faculty along with the school of business, the school of engineering and Biomedical Sciences You can see a picture there on top of the 3D printer and other technology our students have access to It’s in Sterne Library so it’s available almost 24/7 The Maker’s Space has been a great collaboration along with a number of other schools and the College of Arts and Sciences In the process of that, we applied for and attained funding from the National Science Foundation for four innovation fellows per a year Who help lead this space, lead the activities there and who help push innovation at UAB, especially among undergraduates as well as our masters programs Also, on the second floor of the Stern Library, we’re renovating a large space for our N2 International Student Center You can see the various kinds of classrooms, meeting rooms, learning resource center and so forth That will be done in January of 2017 Lister Hill Library, our library for the health science, we continue to also add content and

make renovations Both of these libraries have really become even stronger magnets for students studying by themselves but especially in small groups or larger groups and that continues on the first floor where we just made major renovations and have made plans on the second floor along with a new museum for the archives of UAB We have a fabulous innovation lab at Innovation Depot Our incubator has about 100 companies in it, plus or minus at any one time School of Business initiated this I-Lab and it has become a hotbed of activity Already half a dozen student run new companies have been formed and the faculty work with our students there, mentor them, both undergraduate as well as masters and advance degree levels They do real work for the companies that are there in the form of marketing plans, business plans, funding plans and otherwise We’ve got some exciting new expansion of green space Intramural fields One that will be a square block, large, and it will be done in the coming year between 5th and 6th Ave and 11th and 12th St. It’ll be the equivalent of two football fields and it’ll be for our club sports and our intramural activities as well as for our recreation center The campus master plan, J. Fowler and our facilities team, lead by Bob McMaines and others are doing a fabulous job We now have a ten year forward looking master plan that truly is helping us develop one of the most welcoming, attractive, sustainable, state-of-the-art urban campuses in the nation We have expanded now to about a hundred blocks in Birmingham on the south side, about 25% of downtown Birmingham, and we want to make sure we are good neighbors to all of the communities and activities around us We now are basically connected to downtown via Park Side, as we are contiguous to Parks Side where Regions Park and Railroad Park and all of the housing and retail and other development is occurring It connects us down to where we transfer to downtown under the viaducts and across the railroad tracks Our campus life is richer and busier than ever and you see there on top fireworks being shot off with our basketball opener at Hoops on the Green That’s been a fabulous event, one of the best events leading up a basketball season in the nation We expect great things from our Men’s and Women’s basketball teams this year We are strongly promoting sustainability and our facilities department has set aside a specific budget that continues to expand for our sustainability projects and our green space projects Our campus is becoming more and more green We were rewarded a Trees Campus of America last year We planted many hundreds of new trees across campus We just attained a silver rating in our first national sustainability assessment by the Associations for the Advancement of Sustainability and Higher Education We just dedicated after installing a new campus recreation center hundred-panel solar system, which is the largest solar energy system in Birmingham It runs our campus recreation center with the energy that’s generated We are also making important enhancements to campus Walkability, Bike ability, and safety from the standpoint of traffic We are in a city and we strive to be a very safe and secure campus, which we are, but we got exciting new 10th Ave. project that will totally chance our street scape, in that extended, very important corridor, which parallels University, which is 8th Ave and I’ll show you a few pictures that kind of point out some of the changes On the left you see the existing, it’s a four lane in some areas and two lanes at the ends So there’s the opportunity for cars to accelerate and go too fast in those four lane areas We are going to change it to two lanes with a center turn lane and we are going to put biking lanes and each side and still have some on street campus parking

They’re extending the intersections that will stop traffic from coming up all the way to the intersection and turning right And we’re putting in two new signals at 17th street and I think it’s 13th or 12th, somewhere in that area So it’s really going to change the whole landscape of that Also, there are also some addition plannings on each side of the road, but in the future the plan it to install a median with additional plannings and make that area even greener, much like University Blvd. is a beautiful backbone of the campus now We continue to try to strive to make sure we’re a great place work, a great place to study, and great place to come and have your health care delivered by a world-class team We just won recognition as among the 25 best midsize employers, that’s up to several billion, in the US We were one of four universities in that top 25 and one of only two academic medical centers, the other being John Hopkins so we were proud of that and we continue to strive Our HR teams continues to strive to make sure we supply benefits that are as good, or better, than anywhere else We’ve added some new, consumer driven health plans Our new parental leave policy, our plan to expand our childcare and other amenities are what make us a great place to work, because the most important asset we have at UAB is our people We have a great people and we want to be a place that people are proud to come to work every day, are excited about it and are thriving Same for our students We’re going to have a new, first-time climate survey, engagement survey, our faculty and staff across the university in the spring We are working with a group called Modern Think who have a lot of benchmarking data They work with the Chronicle of Higher Education and hundreds of universities, presidents and colleges and we want them to work with us to develop a survey See what we are doing well, what we can do better, because we want or faculty and staff to work and think everyday about how we can work better together and we want everyone to have a voice in our direction forward and we want to have very strong shared governance with our faculty, our staff, our students and our alumni and community Our faculty continued to do well nationally and internationally We ranked in the top 150 world universities, the top 1% around the world, and 67th in the US and these are based on metrics and you can see those metrics on the left In the world, we were number 89 on patents approved last year 116th ranked in influence You see in publications, scholarly productivity, we ranked 145 Our research expenditures, again, we increased on almost one hundred million over the last one to two years and we continue to go up and to grow We’re tenth among public universities in NIH funding, just under 250 million in the year and that’s up about 20% over the last two years We know that to be a world-class research intensive university we have to have world-class infrastructure Information technology and research computing, we’ve made major investment over the last year Under the leadership of our Chief Information Officer, Curt Carver, we’ve made really big enhancements over this past year We’ve improved our bandwidth, our connectivity and our storage and we have the first 100 gigabyte internet connection in the state of Alabama We have connections to Nashville and Atlanta to back-up our data systems We have a new expanded supercomputer that’s the most powerful in Alabama So it’s changing, over time Each time point is up two seconds here and it’s just this how your brain is changing You can see how fast that’s rendering UAB has taken a quantum leap into high performance computing and researchers like Kristina Visscher

will reap the rewards We’re trying to understand how the brain works, but we’re trying to understand what parts of the brain are connected to other parts of the brain To do that, we collect data using MRI about a lot of people and each dataset is enormous Way too big to have on your laptop Thanks to a relationship with Dell Computers and UAB, the upgraded supercomputer can now store 6.6 petabytes, a tenfold increase over UAB’s last computing hardware Processing power has increased to 110 teraflops, which is an 11-fold increase This increase represents an incredible investment in providing infrastructure to UAB’s world-class faculty Allowing researchers to input more data, run more complex software and process a higher volume of experiments The high performance computer at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is the largest and fastest high performance computer in the state of Alabama at this point, so it creates an advantage for our researchers, those that are working with very large datasets, such as genomics or genomic packages and sequencing, are now able to load the entire genomics sequence in that they’re working on and the be able to manipulate that If you go back one year, we had to split it into very small pieces and then try to stich all of that back together Right now, in 2016, most of the new progress that going to be made in the next few years in science is going to be a result of the amazing advances in computation that are occurring now And because we can analyze and quickly display these enormous dataset, that would not have been possible five years ago, much less ten or fifteen years ago, because we can do that, we can move forward in science By the way, that was a human cerebellum and that was instant-by-instant activity while thinking about or processing cognitive or sensory or other activities What it used to takes days to do, we can do in hours now in these large, massive datasets We have certainly always been an institute on the cutting edge of innovation; collaboration and we continue to work hard to accelerate that Our Harvard Institute for Innovation & Entrepreneurship has a very successful year Had more revenue, more start-up companies, more licenses and patents last year than ever before Innovation Depot, the largest business incubator in the Southeast is thriving It’s full It’s got about 100 companies, the good thing is five to ten a year graduate and the next year five to ten come in Through our plans for the Innovation District, we will be building in downtown Birmingham technology villages, which will be homes for companies that grow out of there and the companies that we recruit to partner with our city and business community There are some constitutional amendments on upcoming November 8th ballot in Alabama One in particular is very important for communities around the state It’s call the budget isolation resolution act and if you just read the act itself it doesn’t make a lot of sense because it’s written in legislativese But essentially, what it would do is allow a thousand or so bills that have been passes since 1984 to remain in action because there was a subtle legislative twist when those were enacted and there was a ruling by a judge that said that didn’t quite follow, we’ve got to hold these up The lodging tax on hotels in Alabama and in Birmingham, which supports the county of Jefferson County Convention Center, that’s one of them About 20 million dollars to our schools in Birmingham and Jefferson County Vestavia, City of Birmingham, other county schools There’s a lot of other projects that go on Well for UAB, we plan to play our future football games in a new world-class Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Center Stadium, right beside the convention center where the have space and plans and this amendment needs to be voted yes in order for the county to be able to continue to attain those funds and fund that project It’s also going to renovate the entire convention center It will provide a tremendous economic impact on that part of Birmingham and the opportunity

really for that whole Norwood neighborhood to see economic progress We don’t tell you how to vote, but we want to make sure everybody’s informed, especially our UAB and Birmingham community Well, our hospital and clinics and School of Medicine continue to provide among the very best care anywhere in the world We now have the third largest public hospital, 1157 beds, 19th largest in America More importantly, it is as advance technologically as any in the world and our people are compassionate as well as highly competent Every week, I get a lot of feedback in the community about great experiences people have had with their family or loved ones or friends who have had very serious, life threating illness who’s lives were saved in out hospitals, both UAB, our adult hospitals and children’s pediatric hospital Our faculty, our physician, our nursing staff are unsurpassed, the compassion along with the excellence provides us, our community, our state with the best care in America and the world Our specialties in both the adult hospital and the children’s hospital continue to rank highly and climb in their acclaim We have 23,000 employees and 20,000 students and we want to make sure that we’re using all that brainpower and processing power to help our community, both here in our city and in the metropolitan community across the state and rural areas as well as the nation and around the world Our Benevolent Fund, which is our employee giving fund for those who are in need increased 5% this past year to over two million dollars 1.2 million of that goes to United Way of Alabama, which funds over eighty agencies across our city and in our metropolitan community doing great things for people truly in need Our employee assistants fund helps out employees who have a difficult illness or a difficult situation and we’re building our third Habitat for Humanity house this year in the last three years You can see how many of our employees and students have volunteered This will be dedicated this Saturday The future homeowner is a US Navy veteran We’re very proud that our students provided over 309,000 service hours last year Both here and around the world and that translated into about 23 million dollars worth evaluation We continue to promote the arts not only through our campus, but our community We have a very thriving cultural art quarter We’re in one of those facilities, The Alys Stephens Center, a world-class performing arts center Our Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts just across the street in a new, world-class venue for our art and art history department, our faculty and students, but also having a remarkable collection and some very remarkable installations over the last couple of years You can see that ArtPlay, which is our art education program, through the Alys-Stephens Center, served over 19,000 people, many of them students through out our community who wouldn’t have access otherwise We go to them, then we bring them here, to the Alys-Stephens center We have a great collaboration between ArtPlay, Alys-Stephens Center, visual arts with our patients and our nursing units We have an institute for art in medicine, where our teachers and artists go into our hospitals, many times on the wards with the sickest patients with cancer or other life threatening diseases and they make a tremendous difference for the patients, for the family and for the staff The staff gets as much out of it as the patients and families do It’s been a tremendous added advantage and really something we can be very proud of You can see out front of Alys-Stephens Center here, our new digital marquee You can’t see it scale here because of the size of the picture, but it’s a beautiful new digital marquee The new branding for the Alys-Stephens Center was celebrating our 20th anniversary so this is the celebration year for us Our Campaign for UAB which has a goal of raising a billion dollars to invest in our people and programs and initiatives is going extremely well

We just past 745 million and we’re on our way in the next two or three years to complete that We raised the most money ever raised last year with 113 million That’s the third year we’ve gone up over a hundred million and increased each year over these last three And you see it’s not a few people, it’s 91,000 people who have contributed and more than half are first time donors Tremendous support of our athletics programs this last year with our strategic plan We raised 20 million dollars for new facilities in the Legacy Pavillion We’re very appreciative of that partnership, the largest partnership agreement that we’ve had for UAB athletics and the impact is being felt across all of our various athletic programs Our endowment continues to grow Our goal when we started the campaign was 450 million, we almost there, so we’ve informed the development team that the new goal is 500 million The problem with success is that we expect more Strategic planning has played a critical role in these successes This is a strategic plan that we want every person at UAB to feel a part of Our faculty, our student, our staff, certainly our leadership and our alumni and our community have participated together to put together a truly comprehensive forward-looking, living, dynamic, strategic plan to guide UAB’s growth around our priorities over the next five years We have continued to refine the plan and have now put together a strategic planning council, which is more of a coordinating and communicating group that will interface with our constituents Members from every constituent group, our faculty, our students, our alumni and are staff as well as our community leaders We want the input of all of our talented people and we want to make this a plan that’s a plan for all of us We created last year a staff council, comparable to a faculty senate as a body that represents the staff’s voice as the faculty senate represents the faculty’s voice We want them to have their role as well in our shared governance We just celebrated the second annual Staff Day conference or Staff Day Celebration The staff have really become energized and they’re more engaged in our thinking forward that ever before, similar to our students through our student government association and our faculty through our faculty senate Really, this is all about the accomplishments of the great people that make up UAB I want to thank you, each and every one of you, and all of you tuning in on YouTube and elsewhere Thank you for your involvement in the great work that’s going on here and it’s truly something we can all be extremely proud of, which is having a tremendous impact Thank you very much for your attention!

Uncategorized

At Home with Jim and Joy – 2020-08-10 – Jim and Joy Call-in Show

[MUSIC] >> Joy: WELCOME! YOU ARE AT HOME WITH JIM AND JOY AND YOU ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR EWTN FAMILY WE’RE DELIGHTED THAT YOU HAVE WELCOMED US INTO YOUR HOME NOW, TODAY, IT’S MONDAY AND WE’RE TAKING QUESTIONS FROM YOU, OUR VIEWERS IF YOU ARE WATCHING DURING THIS LIVE BROADCAST, WE WANT YOU TO GIVE US A JINGLE AT IWO JIMA NUMBER 205-271-2980 OR TOLL-FREE 1-800-221-9460 YOU CAN SEND US A QUESTION OR A COMMENT TO AT [email protected] CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK, TOO THE QUESTION OF THE DAY THAT WE PUT OUT THERE FOR YOU THIS WEEK, PLEASE SHARE ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF FRIENDSHIP, AND MINISTRY GROUPS IN SUPPORT OF YOUR LIFE AND YOUR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY THAT IS IMPORTANT ESPECIALLY DURING THIS COVID PANDEMIC WHERE WE FIND OURSELVES PEOPLE ARE BEING ISOLATED HOW DO WE GET TOGETHER GROUPS ARE CHANGING LOTS OF GROUPS HAVE CHANGED, GOING VIRTUAL >> Jim: THANK ABOUT MINISTRY GROUPS THAT SUPPORT YOU IN YOUR LIFE, THINK ABOUT FRIENDS THROUGHOUT THE YEARS MAYBE THAT PARTICULAR FRIEND HAS CHANGED, PASSED AWAY AND SOMEBODY ELSE DEVELOPED THE FRIENDSHIP WITH YOU WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES A FRIENDSHIP, FELLOWSHIP GROUP MADE IN YOUR LIFE TO GET YOU NOT ONLY THROUGH THIS LIFE BUT TO HELP YOU BECOME ALL YOU CAN BE IN THIS SPIRITUAL JOURNEY >> SO MANY SUPPORT GROUPS OUT THERE, RIGHT LOTS OF SUPPORT GROUPS FOR ALCOHOLICS, AL ANON, SUPPORT GROUPS OUT THERE FOR MARRIAGE, FAMILY THERE’S A GROUP EVERYWHERE, THAT YOU CAN PLUG INTO, WHEREVER YOU ARE THAT’S A BEAUTIFUL PART OF THE SPIRITUAL JOURNEY >> Jim: YOU WANT TO HEAR THE GROUPS, FRIENDSHIPS, SO THAT YOU CAN BE BETTER FRIENDS AND WE HAD A BEAUTIFUL WEEKEND THIS WEEKEND >> Joy: WE DID >> Jim: AND PART OF THE WEEKEND WAS THE CELEBRATION OF TWO OF OUR CHILDREN, ANNA AND REBEKAH >> OUR TWINS >> ANNA ROBINSON AND REBEKAH, THEY CELEBRATED THEIR 40TH BIRTHDAY! IF THEY ARE 40, HOW OLD ARE WE? GOOD GRIEF! THEY ARE 40 AND WE’RE SO INCREDIBLY PROUD OF THEM, WONDERFUL WIVES, MOTHERS, AND BETWEEN THEM, BOTH 12 CHILDREN, 12 LIVING CHILDREN BOY, IT’S JUST, WHEN I THINK OF THEM, I SEE THEM AND I WAS JOKING WITH THEM THE OTHER DAY I WAS SAYING, IF YOU DON’T KNOW HOW YOU WERE BORN, I WAS THERE AND I SAW EVERYTHING THIS IS WHAT IT IS ABOUT THERE’S NOTHING BETTER THAN TO SEE CHILDREN WHO HAVE COME THROUGH UPS AND DOWNS IN LIFE AND REALLY MADE THE COMMITMENT TO BE MARRIED AND OPEN TO HUMAN LIFE AND TO LOOK IN THEIR FACES FROM WHEN THEY WERE REALLY SMALL TO WHERE THEY ARE NOW AND THERE’S NOTHING LIKE TWINS MY BROTHER HAS TWINS, PATTY AND CAREY, MARY AND MARTHA AND THEY WERE ALL BORN ON THE SAME DAY THEN, HE HAD TWIN GIRLS, MARY AND MARTHA NOTHING QUITE LIKE TWINS MAYBE TRIPLETS! SO WE’D LOVE TO HEAR ABOUT THAT LIFE MATTERS AND FAMILY TRANSFORMS THE WORLD THEY ARE ABOUT THAT SACRIFICIAL, LOVING WOMEN CONTRIBUTING TO THEIR FAMILIES, TO THE CHURCH AND TO THE WORLD >> THEY ARE FAITHFUL, LOYAL, AND THEY KNOW THE BEST ABOUT THEMSELVES AND THEY KNOW THE WORST ABOUT THEMSELVES AND I THINK THEY ARE HONEST OF THE EVALUATION WHO THEY ARE FOR THEIR 40TH BIRTHDAY >> WE HAD THEM ON THE SHOW >> RIGHT AND THEY MADE WHISPERS THAT THEY WOULD LIKE TO COME BACK ON THIS THANKSGIVING >> RIGHT CHRISTMAS OR SOMETHING AND WE’D LOVE TO HAVE THEM BACK >> WELL, WHAT WE DID FOR THEM ON THEIR 40TH BIRTHDAY WE SENT THEM ALONG FOR THE WEEKEND YOU BANG ROLLED IT I SET IT UP AND THEY WENT AWAY, BY THEMSELVES, THEY WERE, LIKE, DO YOU WANT TO COME AND I WAS, LIKE, NO, I DON’T WANT TO COME YOU NEED TO BE A TWIN GO AND FIND YOURSELF AGAIN IN LIFE, AS THE SCRIPTURE READING WAS TODAY, YOU FIND YOUR LIFE WHEN YOU LOSE YOUR LIFE AND AS MOTHERS, IN THE WONDERFUL SERVANT MOTHERS THEY ARE, JUST GO BACK AND RECAPTURE WHO YOU ARE AND THEY HAD A GREAT, GREAT TIME >> AND IF YOU WANT TO LOSE YOUR LIFE, GET MARRIED, HAVE CHILDREN AND LOSE YOUR LIFE, GIVING IT AWAY SACRIFICIALLY AS CHRIST LOVED HIS BRIDE, YOU FIND YOUR

LIFE BECAUSE IT IS MORE BLESSED TO GIVE THAN TO RECEIVE, IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, GIVING YOU EVERY OPPORTUNITY >> AND THAT’S THE BEAUTY OF IT SO, YOU FIND OUT THE PURPOSE TO WHICH YOU WERE MADE AND I CERTAINLY, MY CHILDREN, BEING YOUR WIFE, AND THOSE RELATIONSHIPS HAVE MADE ME THE WOMAN I AM TODAY DID I NEED LITTLE GROUPS, GOOD FRIENDS TO GUIDE ME ALONG THAT JOURNEY WE DID WE HAD GOOD GREAT GROUPS IN OUR CHURCH ESPECIALLY FOR THE YOUNG MOMS, THAT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT SO, WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU TODAY THE QUESTION IS THIS: WHAT IS THE IMPORTANCE ABOUT FRIENDSHIPS AND MINISTRY GROUPS IN YOUR LIFE AND IN YOUR SPIRITUAL JOURNEY HOW IMPORTANT ARE THEY TO YOU >> GIVE US A CALL AND EMAIL US NOW WE WANT TO HEAR YOUR RESPONSE PLENTY MORE TO COME PLEASE, DON’T GO AWAY [MUSIC] [MUSIC] >> Joy: WELCOME BACK REMEMBER, TODAY WE’RE TAKING YOUR QUESTIONS DURING OUR SHOW IF YOU ARE WATCHING, YOU KNOW IT’S A LIVE BROADCAST IT’S MONDAY SO GIVE US A JINGLE 205-271-2980 OR TOLL-FREE 1-800-221-9460 SEND US AN EMAIL TO [email protected] AND CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK TOO SO, THE QUESTION IS, PLEASE SHARE WITH US THE IMPORTANCE OF A FRIENDSHIP, AND MINISTRY GROUPS IN SUPPORT OF YOUR LIFE AND THE SPIRITUAL JOURNEY BECAUSE THE SPIRITUAL JOURNEY GOES ON FOREVER RIGHT? UNTIL WE END THIS LIFE AND GO FROM LIFE TO LIFE >> YOU ARE NEVER ON THE JOURNEY ALONE IF YOU ARE A COMMUNAL PERSON, WE’RE MEANT TO BE IN RELATIONSHIPS, ACCOMPANIMENT AND TO ACCOMPANY OTHERS ON THE PHONE, ELLEN AND T.J.HOLT NOW, WE APPRECIATE YOU HERE SO MUCH, WITH OUR TEAMS, LADY, YOU ARE THE UNITED STATES SUPER REGION RESPONSIBLE COUPLE SHARE WITH US WHY TEAMS OF OUR LADY IS IMPORTANT FOR MARRIAGE >> WELL, IT’S AN IMPORTANT MOVEMENT AND OUR GOAL IS TO GROW IN HOLINESS WE ALL NEED SUPPORT TO DO THAT THAT’S WHERE THE TEAM PART OF TEAMS OF OUR LADY COMES IN IT’S FIVE TO SEVEN COUPLES, COUNSELORS THAT HELP US THROUGH OUR DAILY WALK IN LIFE GROWING CLOSER TO THE LORD, ALSO AS WE GROW CLOSER TO EACH OTHER >> RIGHT AND WE DO THAT BECAUSE WE MEET ON A MONTHLY BASIS, SHARING A SIMPLE MEAL, PRAYER, AND A STUDY TOPIC IT REALLY HELPED US OUT A LOT WHEN WE FIRST MOVED TO TEXAS OVER 20 YEARS AGO WE DIDN’T KNOW ANYBODY IN THE COMMUNITY AT ALL WE MOVED THERE, AND WE WERE NEW OUR FAMILY WAS STILL IN THE MIDWEST THOSE PEOPLE THAT CAME TO OUR LIFE AS STRANGERS OVER THE LAST 20 YEARS HAVE REALLY BECOME REALLY CLOSE FRIENDS AND WE’VE SHARED SO MUCH OF OUR LIVES TOGETHER I CAN’T IMAGINE, FOR THE LAST 20 YEARS WITHOUT THEM SO, IT’S BEEN VERY BENEFICIAL TO US >> Jim: IT SEEMS TO BE MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER BEFORE, IN OUR CULTURE AND OUR SOCIETY TODAY WITH THE SHIFTING SANDS REGARDING WHAT MARRIAGE DOES, AND THE ASSAULT UPON MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY AND HUMAN IDENTITY AND TO GET TOGETHER WITH OTHER COUPLES FOR OUR FAMILY AND OUR CHILDREN, TO SEE US, TAKING THAT TIME TO SAY, MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY IS SO IMPORTANT WE NEED THIS SORT OF ACCOMPANIMENT, THE JOY OF HAVING A MEAL TOGETHER, RECEIVING INSTRUCTION AND IMAGINE THAT YOU PRAY EXTENSIVELY TOGETHER >> WE DO NOTHING WAS MORE AMPLIFIED, I REMEMBER ONE FOURTH OF JULY, WE WERE GETTING TOGETHER TO WATCH THE FIREWORKS AND THE ADULTS WERE OVER TALKING AND I NOTICED THAT OUT OF THE CORNER OF MY EYE, THE CHILDREN OF ALL OF OUR FAMILIES WERE

SITTING DOWN, IN A CIRCLE AND I OVERHEARD THEM TALKING ABOUT WHAT WAS REALLY GOOD IN THEIR LIFE OVER THE LAST WEEK OR SO, AND WHAT HADN’T BEEN SO GOOD IN THEIR LIFE THEY WERE SHARING THAT AND WHAT THEY WERE DOING IS REALLY IMITATING THE VERY FIRST PART OF OUR MEETING WE SIT AT TABLE, TALK, AND WE CAN SHARE THOSE KIND OF THINGS AND WE CAN SEE THAT SUPPORT SO, THAT WAS BEAUTIFUL TO SEE WHAT OUR CHILDREN PICKED UP AND WHAT THEY WERE EMULATING >> NOW, YOU SHARED THAT YOU HAVE BEEN IN THE GROUP FOR 20 YEARS IS IT THE SAME PEOPLE OR HAVE SOME PEOPLE MOVED AWAY? HAVE YOU INTRODUCED NEW PEOPLE INTO THE GROUP? TELL ME, HOW DID THAT WORK OUT? >> WE HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE SAME TEAM FOR 20 YEARS ONE OR TWO COUPLES LEFT, AND THEY WERE REPLACED WITH OTHER COUPLES OVER TIME BUT ESSENTIALLY, WE’VE BEEN WITH, WHAT — >> YEAH, ABOUT FOUR COUPLES >> FOR THE ENTIRE 20 YEARS >> RIGHT THE ENTIRE 20 YEARS THAT’S COMMON PEOPLE GET TRANSFERRED OR WHATEVER THE CAUSE MAY BE BUT IT’S WONDERFUL TO WELCOME NEW COUPLES INTO OUR TEAM BUT WE’VE SHARED SO MUCH >> WEDDING, GRADUATIONS AND YOU NAME IT >> AND WE’VE SHARED SAD MOMENTS IN LIFE TOO TO HAVE THAT KIND OF SUPPORT, AS YOU MENTIONED EARLIER, BEING WITH PEOPLE THAT ARE LIKE-MINDED HAS REALLY BEEN SO IMPORTANT, ESPECIALLY IN TODAY’S CULTURE AND THE CHALLENGES THAT WE FACE AND WE ALSO STRIVE TO DO SOMETHING CALLED THE ENDEAVORS IT’S A LIST OF SEVEN THINGS THAT WE TRY TO DO ON A MONTHLY BASIS TO GROW SPIRITUALLY AS WELL AS GROWING TOGETHER AS A COUPLE IT’S SIMPLE THINGS THAT WE SHOULD ALL BE DOING AND WE LOOK AT THAT, TRYING TO DO IT ONCE A MONTH READING OF THE WORD, PRAYING TOGETHER, PRAYING AS A FAMILY >> AND PERSONAL PRAYER YOU MENTIONED PRAYER EARLIER AND PRAYER IS PART OF OUR MEETINGS BECAUSE WE OFFER PETITIONS AND HAVE LITURGICAL PRAYER BUT THE ENDEAVOR IS TO WORK ON BEING HOLY EVERYDAY PRAYER IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PARTS OF THAT >> WHAT DO PEOPLE DO WHO ARE HEARING THIS AND SAYING, OH, THIS IS GOOD FOR ME AND MY HUSBAND, AND MY WIFE, TO BE INVOLVED IN SOMETHING LIKE THIS WHERE DO I GO I DON’T KNOW IF I CAN PLUG IN WILL THEY HELP ME TO BE PART OF THE TEAM WHAT DO THEY DO >> WELL, THE EASIEST THING THEY CAN DO IS REACH OUT TO US THEY CAN GET THAT INFORMATION BY GOING TO OUR WEB SITE, teamsofourlady.org OUR PHONE NUMBER IS LISTED RIGHT THERE OUR EMAIL IS LISTED THERE AND WE’RE HAPPY TO HELP OTHERS TO FIND OUT FIRST OF ALL, IF TEAMS MAY BE IN THEIR AREA AND IF IT’S NOT, THEN WE CAN PUT THEM IN TOUCH WITH FOLKS TO HELP THEM START A TEAM IN THEIR AREA EVEN DURING THIS TIME, THIS VERY TRYING TIME OF PANDEMIC WE ARE STILL BEING ABLE TO DO THAT, HELP PEOPLE TO FEEL CONNECTED >> ELLEN AND T.J., THANKS SO MUCH FOR SHARING AND WE ARE VERY STRONG HERE IN THE DIOCESE OF BIRMINGHAM GO TO teamsofourlady.org, AND THEY CAN HELP GET YOU INVOLVED IN A GROUP >> Joy: I THINK ONE OF THE THINGS THAT ELLEN AND T.J. WERE SHARING, SO MANY OF THE THINGS HAPPENING IN OUR LIVES AND SPIRITUAL JOURNEY, EVERYTHING HAS TO BE INTENTIONAL NOTHING HAPPENS BY ACCIDENT SO, EVEN IF YOU ARE SAYING, I WANT TO GROW IN HOLINESS I WANT TO GROW IN OUR SPIRITUALITY HOW ARE WE GOING TO DO THAT WE NEED TO PLUG INTO A GROUP AS A COUPLE SO WE CAN JOURNEY WITH OTHER PEOPLE WHICH MEANS THAT IT’S A COMMITMENT ARE THEY GOING TO MEET ONCE A MONTH ARE THEY GOING TO DO A MEAL TOGETHER SACRIFICE TIME SACRIFICE OUR HOME WE GET TOGETHER WITH PEOPLE AND EVERYTHING HAS TO BE INTENTIONAL IF YOU ARE AT HOME AND SAYING, WELL, I DON’T HAVE ANY FRIENDS TO MAKE IT MATTER YOU HAVE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND IT REQUIRES A SACRIFICE >> ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WE’RE DOING AT HOME WITH JIM AND JOY THE GREAT WORK OF EWTN WE’VE LEARNED HOW MANY INCREDIBLE MINISTRIES THERE ARE IN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE WHAT WE’RE TRYING TO DO, MAKE THEM KNOWN AND TEAMS OF OUR LADY AND YOU HAVE TO GO TO THE WEB SITE, PICK UP THE PHONE AND PEOPLE ARE JUST WAITING FOR YOU TO GIVE THEM A CALL GO TO THE WEB SITE AND THEY WILL

PLUG YOU RIGHT IN SO, TELL US ABOUT FRIENDSHIP OR A PARTICULAR GROUP IN YOUR LIFE >> Voice: YEAH, HI, SO NICE TO BE WITH YOU TODAY OUR GROUP IS MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER AND IT’S AN EXTENSION OF OUR MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER AND IT’S PAST 30 YEARS, COUPLES THERE, BEEN PRAYING ALL THEIR LIFE SPENT THEIR LIFE IN THE RELATIONSHIP OF FAMILIES AND UPS AND DOWNS LIKE THEY WERE SAYING WE DEAL WITH ALL JUST THE WAY THEY DEAL, WITH OUR FRIENDS AND WE’VE BECOME LIKE A FAMILY BUT THEN, OF COURSE, AS TIME GOES ON, YOU THINK HOW OLD YOU ARE GETTING BY THEN AND YOU START TO LOSE SPOUSES AND AS A RESULT OF THAT, ONE OF THE COUPLES, BONNIE CLARK AND JIM, SHE CAME UP WITH AN INSPIRATION FROM THE HOLY SPIRIT TO GATHER UP THIS GROUP OF GIRLFRIENDS AND CALL THEM THE M.E. GIRLFRIEND’S, MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER GIRLFRIEND’S AND THE RESULT OF THAT, THERE’S FIVE WIDOWS IN OUR GROUP AS WE HAVE GROWN, EACH YEAR FROM SOMEONE ELSE, ONE OF THE JUST A MIRACLE THAT WE HAVE IT WHEN I EXPERIENCED THIS, WHEN MY HUSBAND PASSED AWAY, WE DIDN’T HAVE THIS AND WE WERE VERY INVOLVED IN MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER ALL OF A SUDDEN, YOUR LIFE IS SO DISCONNECTED ALL OF THE TIME AND ALL OF THE YEARS THAT YOU SPENT DOING COUPLE ACTIVITIES NO LONGER EXIST AND NOW ALL YOU HAVE IS YOURSELF I JUST FELT SO ALONE AND THREW ME OFF A CLIFF AND I DIDN’T KNOW WHERE I WAS GOING TO FREE FALL FROM AND AFTER SO MANY YEARS, YOUR SOUL, IT JUST HURTS YOUR SOUL YOU CAN’T EXPLAIN THE DEPTH OF HURT BEING BECAUSE WHEN YOU LOSE YOUR HAD YOU BEEN, THAT ALONE IS JUST AN INCREDIBLE EVENT AND EXPERIENCE IN YOUR LIFE TO FACE BUT THE GIRLFRIEND, WHEN BONNIE DID THIS, IT WAS, LIKE, IT OPENS UP A WORLD AGAIN AND IT’S MODELED ON THE MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER FORMAT, EXCEPT A LITTLE MORE FLEXIBLE WE MEET THREE OR FOUR TIMES A YEAR IT’S NOT MONTHLY AND WE HAVE A FLEXIBILITY AT EACH OTHER’S HOMES, AS FAR AS WHICH PERSON IS GOING TO DO THE TOPIC ON BOOKS, FAITH, FAMILIES, DO IT ON MUSIC AND ANY TOPIC BECAUSE YOU HAVE THE FLEXIBILITY TO DO HER OWN THING AT THE END, WE HAVE A QUESTION, DIALOGUE, A SHARING AND WE LOVE BEING TOGETHER WE SUPPORT EACH OTHER THROUGH SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH >> AMEN THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR SHARING ABOUT THIS, JUST A BEAUTIFUL MEANING FELL SHIP GROUP AND FELT LIKE SHE WAS FREE FALLING AND WOUND UP IN THE WIDOWS GROUP FOR GIRLFRIENDS IF YOU ARE INTERESTED, WRITE TO US, AT [email protected] GET IN TOUCH WITH ROSE AND WE’LL GET YOU IN TOUCH WITH HER OR BONNIE CLARK AND GO FROM THERE TO DEVELOP YOUR OWN GROUP FOR SUPPORT IN THIS WAY THANK YOU FOR THE CALLS THANK YOU FOR GETTING IN TOUCH WITH US WE ALL NEED FRIENDS AND WE ALL NEED TO BE A FRIEND! PLENTY MORE TO COME, PLEASE, DON’T GO AWAY [MUSIC] [MUSIC] >> WELCOME BACK! NOW, BEFORE WE WRAP UP, WE’RE GOING TO ROME TO SEE BEAUTIFUL JOAN FRIENDSHIPS HAVE PLAYED AN IMPORTANT PART IN YOUR LIFE, HAVEN’T THEY? >> WELL HI JIM AND JOY! YOU KNOW IT’S ALWAYS A PLEASURE TO BE WITH YOU BUT I SURELY WISH I COULD HAVE BEEN SITTING WITH YOU IN YOUR LIVING ROOM IN YOUR CONVERSATION ABOUT FRIENDS AND FRIENDSHIP, AND MINISTRIES THAT SUPPORT US

IN OUR LIFE I THINK THAT EVEN HEARING OR SAYING THE WORD FRIEND, EACH ONE OF US CONJURES UP AN IMAGE, MAYBE SEVERAL IMAGES MAYBE A BFF, A BEST FRIEND FOREVER, BUT SOMEBODY WHO’S A BIG PART OF OUR LIFE AND WHO BRINGS A SMILE TO OUR FACE! AND I KNOW IN HIGH SCHOOL, I WAS ASKED TO I THINK WE ALL WERE ASKED, TO WRITE A POEM ABOUT FRIENDSHIP AND I HAVE IT SOMEWHERE IN MY FILES BUT I DO REMEMBER THE FIRST WORDS: “THAT FRIENDSHIP IS A PRICELESS TREASURE, IT IS A BRIGHT STAR WHOSE LIGHT NEVER FADES.” IN HIS APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION “CHRISTUS VIVIT” AFTER THE SYNOD ON YOUTH, FRANCIS WROTE: “FRIENDSHIP IS ONE OF LIFE’S GIFTS AND A GRACE FROM GOD FRIENDSHIP TEACHES US TO BE OPEN, UNDERSTANDING AND CARING TOWARDS OTHERS, TO COME OUT OF OUR OWN COMFORTABLE ISOLATION AND TO SHARE OUR LIVES WITH OTHERS FOR THIS REASON, THERE IS NOTHING SO PRECIOUS AS A FAITHFUL FRIEND.” AND I THINK WE ALL KNOW MAN WAS NOT MADE TO BE ALONE! WE HAVE AND WANT AND NEED FAITHFUL FRIENDS EVEN MORE IMPORTANTLY, WE NEED TO BE A FAITHFUL FRIEND TO OTHERS WE HAVE TO BE THERE TO LISTEN TO THEM, TO COMFORT THEM, IF THEY’RE IN A MOMENT OF GREAT PAIN, WHETHER IT’S PHYSICAL OR OTHERWISE WE HAVE TO BE THERE FOR THEM AND I THINK ANOTHER IMPORTANT ASPECT OF FRIENDSHIP IS BEING THERE TO HELP PEOPLE REACH THE BEST OF THEIR POTENTIAL, HELP THEM DEVELOP THAT AND ALSO HELP THEM NOT BE AFRAID TO MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICES IN LIFE, ESPECIALLY THE RIGHT MORAL CHOICES I HAVE TO SAY, ALL OF THIS, HAVING JUST SAID IT NOW ABOUT FRIENDS, THAT THE LORD HAS INDEED GRACED ME WITH COUNTLESS BEAUTIFUL, AMAZING FRIENDS, ALL OVER THE WORLD I MEAN, LAY PEOPLE, AND PRIESTS, ALL MY FRIENDS FROM THE CURIA, THE FRIENDS IN MY PARISH JUST BEAUTIFUL, AMAZING FRIENDSHIPS PEOPLE WHO HAVE BEEN WITH ME IN THE TUMULTUOUS MOMENTS AND THE JOYFUL ONES AND THAT IN ITSELF BRINGS A SMILE TO MY FACE NOW, I THINK IF WE TALK ABOUT TUMULTUOUS, WE CAN’T IGNORE THE COVID AREA I MEAN, THIS IS A TIME FOR WEEKS AND MONTHS, PERHAPS, TODAY STILL FOR SOME PEOPLE, WE’VE BEEN UNABLE TO ACTUALLY BE WITH OUR FRIENDS WE COULD NOT– MAYBE THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA– BUT WE COULD NOT BE THERE TO SHARE, TO LAUGH, TO COMMUNICATE, TO LISTEN, AND BEST OF ALL, TO HUG THAT’S PROBABLY WHAT I MISS MOST BUT ABOVE AND BEYOND THAT, AS LONG AS I KNOW MY FRIENDS ARE THERE FOR ME, AND I HOPE THEY KNOW I’M ALWAYS HERE FOR THEM, THAT IS ANOTHER GRACE OF GOD, AS YOUR FRIENDSHIP AND MY BEING WITH YOU TODAY SO, GOD BLESS YOU BOTH, BUT BACK TO YOU >> Jim: THANK YOU, JOAN THANK YOU SO VERY, VERY MUCH WHAT A BLESSED SHOW ON FELLOWSHIP AND FRIENDSHIP HOW MUCH WE NEED ONE ANOTHER AND I WANT TO MENTION, AUGUST 11TH, WE CELEBRATE FATHER JAMES COYLE YEARS BACK FROM 1904 AND HE WAS JUST AN AMAZING MAN OF GOD SO MANY IRISH PRIESTS CAME OVER TO MINISTER IN OUR COUNTRY AND FATHER COYLE LIVED IN A TIME OF ANTI-CATHOLIC BIGOTRY IN OUR COMMUNITY IT WAS VERY, VERY STRONG FROM 1917 TO 1921 HE WAS ASSASSINATED AS HE SAID HIS PRAYERS ON THE PARSONAGE SWING HE HAD JUST PERFORMED A WEDDING BETWEEN A DARK SKINNED PUERTO RICAN CATHOLIC AND A CONVERTED GIRL TO CATHOLICISM PEOPLE CONSIDER THIS AN INTERRACIAL MARRIAGE AND FOR THAT, HE WAS ASSASSINATED BUT BEING THE FACE IN BIRMINGHAM, MANY YEARS, AND THE FBI SAID HIS THREAT WAS UNDER THREAT, HIS LIFE WAS, FOR TWO YEARS AND SO, WE REMEMBER HIM, WE HAVE A MASS TOMORROW, 12:10PM AT THE CATHEDRAL IF YOU ARE IN TOWN, COME AND BE WITH US WE’RE FRIENDS OF FATHER COYLE AND I JUST SPOKE TO THE GRAND NIECE OF FATHER COYLE MANY RELATIVES IN IRELAND AND MEANS SO MUCH TO THEM THAT WE REMEMBER THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF FATHER COYLE, ASSASSINATED ALMOST A HUNDRED YEARS AGO GO TO THE WEB SITE, FATHER COYLE DOT ORG AND CHECK IT OUT I STARTED A WEB SITE IN HIS MEMORY AND I WAS A LAPSED CATHOLIC AND I PRAYED AT HIS GRAVE AND I CAME BACK TO THE CHURCH SO, I BELIEVE THAT HE IS ALIVE I THINK HE IS PRAYING FOR US THANKS FOR BEING OUR FRIEND, FRIEND AND FAMILY MEMBER OF EWTN YOU ARE NEVER ALONE WE’RE ALL UNITED TOGETHER AND KEEP IT RIGHT HERE ON EWTN GOD BLESS YOU AND ALL OF YOUR

LOVED ONES! BYE NOW [MUSIC]

Uncategorized

City Council Meeting July 23, 2015 Part 2

today what say you can’t get requests this is giving us the rocket block three major stuff like that this is the cabinet still does not supersede a box supersedes day long with they will be in violation all this is the understanding with us at ER with the understanding that would will try to free up that space open immediately need support right but our safety for our first you’re still is the house property any other question vocals yes yes yes so Charles Bruder Clinton item C is that I think having me decided not to move forward that will be something we look at in two weeks it was on the work session agenda so we’re not going to address it here item D to report 1 2015 general obligation debt obligations taken to one number CT 0 to 5 30 was out there thanks man yeah there’s the council this form one CT is a form that finance officer who’s regularly until see whenever we get approved by the Comptroller in advance once we get that approval in advance we filed this we’re on camp the council files this on our behalf as a part of the issuance process we do it as a smaller no dwelling this is marked on top of this one city to having to get this approved in advance agenda last year and half just 17 now front-page here we were the state cockroaches we have to report this formula down such as we are at 41 dead after the bank transactions conclude that we will keep it I would like to point out the financial advisor did a good job they rarely get an interest cost you say it estimated to 2.8 on the front end of the process and the 256 route so we I’ve it was actually a lot higher much much lower interested the next to best bitter so we really well market in this case the payments are consistently an interest in that this is what’s called a balloon intrested principal work overtime but he added together they do balance out and they’d agree stable over the year PF endless we work together the city packets again refinancing 12 years probably will blossom better rates and terms and reach is any questions man sir p different all right out of the discussion about disposal of contraband weapons the top the council says anybody any question about the TCA 1317 13-17 disposal c / few bombs this is law that went into after two thousand and one of the things we’re trying to do proper distance is get that get that on the spell get those items that are inside that elephants out and disposal and probably the state mandates that we do at a couple different was one is to sell the other one is to exchange go into the

cell with its charms pretty intricate other possibility that young some of your teeth drive probably intro so the easiest way to do this would be through an exchange method and by the statute itself is is limited on what the exchange and visual it can be for search arms ammunition or body parts is what it’s limited so what we would like to do and questions or anything we started putting the other small lots of these guns we had the edge have come in last year through your HSN system to try to make sure it back set up they can see a city that none of these problems are used in the crime they’re not gonna pop up after we get rid of and come back as a sort of backing up in see on CBS on software we would like to take exchange these firearms for some patrol rifles and I think everybody seeing a week ago how valuable it is first have car problems that unfortunate situation we’re sort of behind as farce had women that nature we have some but it’s very limited with a different role brothel sob go in upgrade our working from trouble to hide a while under car just in case something like this might happen I always hope that it ever does but you definitely don’t want to be under armed what if it by trading these imp were looking at the only fires with an allotment from GT distributors of about 3,600 five dollars so that would fund approximately four rifles and Samaria training in addition to with since we are setting up our are training to two times a year on qualifying this would help tremendously it would be no additional cost through our budget to the taxpayer and I’m getting really and sore so fun itself or water well we have server farms I wanted to see if he had any question and you did those up now we did not go through the vid it’s a van dates that the flowers licensee has to behave law enforcement dollar plasticity that I know of GT troopers is the only when welcome in town that could do that the next one Craig’s restrictors out an ox one and I believe there’s no place in Nashville that since its local to go to somebody on that particular fantasy he would give us the exchanger you’re talking about 45 arms where they were going a lot of thirty six hundred and five dollars nology virtually said g a council grab it I think most everybody here knows I’m an advocate of firearms I did an assessment how much before they did and what I seen and I wrote down I can’t they’ve been throwing not only local distributor not always your file I just want to be sure they weren’t live on no nobody they did a good job now that they did because I was holding the tricky part you can’t get so any dirt you can’t get it film on looking at balcony well these are they did strike a shower rod with a pretty environments of window for Sean five-seat caliper with some of the necessary equipment such as swings attachments for lights back up sides and oxides we’re looking at 795 dollars for roughing that that’s a pretty good world brain especially some people that there were decent further equipment we would like to have to get to the program started sorting grid of the designers and getting pretty much going

to the bronze in the car you know which we’re trying to do that beginner baseline new opinion return which led many days exchanging that way cuts down any possibilities of the paperwork kind of backgrounds as long as they stay pretty good with the process that gives it certain sort of i could add something also be in touch with eternity now there was about Jennifer 08 defect that love slightly tweaked to us early 15 so I’m sure you have the minister also just connects your eyes most important possible is that there is a best efforts to make sure that the guns that precedes about some soul na mahal to law abiding citizens something that was inside back to the law so we’ll make sure that you’re aware that there’s a few other changes that are important so let’s point to no issue that’s great are my concerns which was under subsection arch even hidden he could be got the most recent was what he was talking about was was a bill how about fair degree of land worth and you got the most recent one with those things that I could find out believe i do without the bubble chair so provided provided g3 touch base with the city attorney make sure the there’s no issue we want to take action on this and that emotion but then keep Greece halfway so motion and second in question your comments please yes yes on a bed of discussion of engineering projects ie infrastructure they named vice mayor professor this place down there yeah this kind of F and H kind of go hand and basically so if you don’t mind let’s just going to take up G and then going to take care of that and then we’ll discuss our police on things have no problem with that is anyone else just as an update for serving mr. Hyatt mr. Worf has touched base with his counsel of his contract has expired her resolution he was paid certain number of vacation weeks there are no hidden claims there’s an agreement that there will not be a claim so as a right now our relationship with Miss tribes will be no repercussions on anyway there’s an agreement with his attorney so I don’t think that we are we are a good place right now but obviously that changes thanks sir obviously we wish the injured i had the as i mentioned earlier i’ll burn up work for us keep on keepin on and doing the very best with you restrict yeah um discussion engineering projects infrastructure deficiency manager position number one Chief William tonight we’ve already had this discussion not that cheap wings he drives up over this building we as I think he would try to absolutely do anything that any of us up here asked him to do so it’s this is this discussion is is no by no means in your reflection upon him however some people have strengths and weaknesses at sea and I have already discussed and if it’s right now it’s in one is pretty much our top property and what the city number

one I think we ought to go ahead and start making preparations to advertise for a city make a CD management now you know that’s one the 30-day process then after we receive applications or talk about another 30 days to fit those and then another 30 days to them and reach an agreement so you’re talking about a three month process so I didn’t believe you that story the one of the things that the city is quite honestly lacking in is is for lack of a better term city engineer and cheap wings not had that discussion also after noon and be it either someone with Public Works experience that that I think that we may need to hire as a new city manager or we may need to go ahead and kind of enter into an agreement with an engineering firm to be our go-to person for the roads and for the sewers sewer project maybe not so much the sewer projects because that we handled by wwta button the roads we definitely are going to I’ve been a real estate broker for 20-plus years I couldn’t take I don’t know how many how many inches of travel to how many inches of asphalt to how many cars / vague and travel on I don’t know anything about that Elmo need a messuage I know my limitations so I think well go ahead and start talking about what we’re going to do and the reason why this all came about Sarah Gardenhire gardenhire and I were on conference call with testing form of economic and Community Development trying to get some money for the sea of East Ridge to do these projects with and in the legislature for the X on over there sandy heart said mark send me the name of the contact person because there are some grants available out there possibly through a flickering on so I said yes okay i’m at circle well and after i had that special you might call the mayor and I said you know Mary needs start talking about this muscle quite honestly we don’t have a point person that is knowledgeable in public works area so that’s how all this came in fact you know and notice rejected again the chief we in Georgia too bad Jablonski but you know mr juve on skis got everything that he can wiggle with on his with other issues so eat at halftime nativity chief Williams he’s busy trying to go to fire all taken care of running the day-to-day operations so I waited out there for the discussion as it says so what order other people’s thoughts you know I thought right now leave it like it is the couple month or three months before you buy that which one take that on four wheelin tiresome right now okay we have a motion do we have a second to to leave things as they are basically not taking any action on which is which bar this that bushes out their grief we have a say which a second have opportunity for discussion I don’t have a problem working up and we counsel a work of a desire this qualification for for a full time to interrupt I recall correctly it took us about a month at I have to do that the last time so yeah that’s what I we did nothing but start that come up yes it is but that’s really a baseline and you can kind of into it we prefer someone that has experience in this area or this area that that kind of thing so I would have a problem moving hit with that process that’s not the motion of full of motion on the floor is tearing

just people like it is and I do anything down groped him again tremendous respected geez we attend and I had this conversation earlier week I said from his respect for him think he’s doing a great job and I Barry and right right understand I don’t want to take it out he’s in the middle of something also don’t want to leave them in so long that it gets burned out trying to do to judge thank you darling I’m good so yeah there’s good dudes I guess it’s a it’s a balancing act here too well we’re still in discussion period here but those are those are my thoughts I think oh fun coming we r air babe dear lady it’s my exit far off go another problem it will look it but Walt that’s all I’m saying I’m not saying get rid of him next week or even next month or you know we’re talking about it extended you know three to four months of process you know I advise timing but six months before we found someone because we had not the first batch the candidates so we had to go back at three amortized again for 30 days and fed them for 30 days so you know I can you know Chief William to not have this discussion maybe he understands my brings up and it’s absolutely nothing it’s been my thing I think he’s a great guy daily runs into burning buildings early how much more breaker can you get into that you know so what I have to say about teeth he’s got councilman you just fight going on right now I think I can take different stuff need to be the years and years ago that time to boil everything works again in a city or cold canada custody because we kind of looked at both of these items at the same time I will I absolutely agree with custom your graphics point that you know we’re going to need some help with infrastructure with roads of servers but we have only in so far all back in Georgia suppose we all wouldn’t listen heading to hear that someone would plenty of drunk is just beside that wrong here then what we had Mohan’s HR now they think I mean the bare facts or are these that they were talking about the exit one upgrades reconfiguration that’s that’s 50 year old transportation technology down they don’t just have a reason they don’t have fun reliefs anymore if I think that that farmer talk to me what hey after that then our sewers are over the over than that long so we definitely need some help in that area in a repair our weakest I’ll probably stay in position they were kind of combined well it is it is but it is related in that I swear grab and said you know he would like to potentially see the city manager that has background him or it’s not background in the infrastructure bar so they are they are tied together there’s no there’s no other comments questions or whatever then will it will proceed to a vote on the motion that’s out his head and don’t take that wrong

man on code but we fight together yesterday now we’ve already covered this track you okay so we have a motion and second on the floor just can’t leave things as they are if there are no other comments or questions we’ll see so so by the smoking now does that mean we’re not even going to discuss potential qualifications for a new city manager or discuss possibly advertising for interesting new city manager which is not even want to talk about is that that’s the way on the word enemies or three for three weeks is really because about any one of us can get put back on for the next but it’s meeting how do you think again I think it would be good that you start talking about what it is we would like to see next even though that’s no I’m talking about is how to start off so that but that’s not the ocean that’s on the floor running emotional for is to then I take really the engine beyond status quo exactly where we are so if are no other comments or questions or no these revisions to the regard motion at second roll call please pass me know okay yeah yes no yes no all right so that really takes care effectively both of those items and again you need one time in the future we can bring out more both of these issues before tonight immediate immediate future we will tend election but just leave things as they would that in probably that we take care of everything on the agenda for tonight i doin this you know the equator and asked if we could have a very brief executive session canceled so you all instead of Eddie have until gathering runs meeting rooms back years back discussion thank you

Uncategorized

Business July 2015 1

thank you so much for coming tonight my name is Bob Beamon and I’m the president of the North Fulton amateur radio League and welcome to our July meeting there are some housekeeping things to get out of the way first of all do aside to do take your telephone and turn that sucker all the way down or turn it off put an old stunt vibrate or whatever but please no phones ringing during the meeting if you just have to leave in the middle of my wonderful speech you can find an engine through the kitchen or you can go out the front door that you came into these doors out here over here are not exits you will die if you go in these doors do not go through these doors if you want some coffee or water that’s in the kitchen don’t be singing cake left Mort don’t run off I didn’t heavily okay the restrooms are at the entrance of please watch for the cords and the and the homeless people laying around on the floor so what I was standing at a camera there and this is important guys last week last month rather yours truly had to do work hmm now I’m retired and worked for me it’s a four-letter word okay we all know that we stack the chairs with when we leave seven high if that’s all you’re going to do is thank your chair up you’re not finished there’s tables out that need to be folded there are garbage bags that need to be taken up to the dumpster and empty and there’s also a nice brand new clean floor it may be vacuuming so let’s please do the whole job before leaving hey it’s time for some announcements we have a great one Martha can you help me in this to use and that is coming all these kids are coming marching down and I would like you to march down this way so you can tell us all about the youth net I know the entire youth crew youth team yes a team has been trying to put together a youth net now for a long time and it looks like it’s come to pass so a few details please well I haven’t started yet and it won’t start till August nineteenth but we’re hoping to get the youth folks on the air i’ll be starting with my students plus mike adams from New Mexico and Ruth from Lawrenceville or some like that and hopefully eventually other folks cross-country and just get them on the air chatting they need the opportunity to chat and hopefully we’ll get that going to come on check in again I here we go I can’t check in the wild man I can’t take in their use me hi I’m telling you this president thing is just overblown really it’s personal Bob Martha I didn’t mean to let you go back the next slide is yours too we have a celebrity in the room Megan Brown thank this here with the mother michelle brown and our founder risk on it and see scott oh there he is hey scott first quarter thank you for coming tonight this is Megan Brown she is the cover girl this month for qst we’re so very proud to have a club member on the as our cover girl she likes that idea will tell me Megan how long have you been in person at ham radio I mean since you haven’t 13 yeah school club what’s a school club roundup it’s a competition where you have to get contacts as many places as you can oh ok well are you allowed to use they have radio stuff while you’re at school now yes I am do you talk to other kids are the guys or girls you talk to is there anything interesting out there though I can’t ask that I can’t ask that but who took the picture to put you all the front of qst Martha did okay Martha can you describe the circumstances under which you took this

picture and what the situation was all about accidents happen when we went to the Dayton ham vention Wes arranged for me to get basically a load of yaesu caps to bring back to all our students who didn’t get to come with us and they said be a good idea to get picture of your kids wearing the caps and I took several and that Meghan King wound up by one day get her calf and I say Lumpkin picture of you there you go with my finger there she goes sorry Tom it’s a great picture we’re so very proud to have you on that picture and we’re very proud to have you on the club too did you get in for free I’m telling you this president thing is just really overblown everybody congratulations so much just one more thing wrote back to that slide somehow something showed up that I don’t think they meant to show up this beautiful piece of woodwork this work of art we sneaked into this picture by a man with commercial expirations and actually he’s an amateur but anyway Jim would you like to tell us who made this but the top of the table your partner made in my shop and I had the driver from Jim just sitting in my basement we vote together and expand this off the table actually that’s a great story and thank you so much for all the work you do for them for the youth team the yes attainment I know there are a lot of other people that do a lot of work for are you think so thank you Jim it like you put a whole crew jewel okay let’s welcome some new members how many new members do we have here tonight raising hi okay what’s your name my name’s Nicholas homes James you have a call nicholas Nicholas yeah people inside Nichols homes all right yeah I took the test so we go welcome welcome to the world ham radio I know you’ll have fun any of the new members any first time people here for here at the meeting any people here first time back and back Wow your name’s Patrick kk for ji k did not you better yeah probably good welcome others first time yes sir no marking what I’m not licensed yet so are welcome yeah the gentleman next to you okay front Melanie Melanie camphor TQ in camp or Jacob GQ in right welcome thank you for coming anyone else Joey burns not licensed Joey brown Bernard I need somebody else to do this I can’t be yes sir matthew thomas okay boy ft lee up from marietta that’s a lot of trip you get lost getting over here well yeah I’ve got a little story I’m Bill Thomas included gorgeous yeah and I’m uh I got my tech license three weeks ago and then I rolled it over to a vanity license which is K for F qh2 from him so I got 93 years ago my dad here got his 53 years all right you wouldn’t have a lot on the lake up there with ya that’s okay just thought I might borrow your boat or so yes me okay sir okay the recall votes at next month’s me later reset but yes sir thank you basically I’m just here with these okay Mikey thing welcome these are my grandson oh just cuz he had long hair okay their son

to spend looking good well are there any other mistake secondly you know we’re gonna do a roll call I don’t think okay yeah day for Clary not licensed yet hey Dave we are here to help you and we will as you see we’ll be doing some schools and classes later so stick around okay Joe oh right back right now you have a chance to buy some more 50 50 tickets they’re only a dollar apiece so going to be two dollars of these ok mr membership in evening no mark kk for fof our membership is it 324 extra 127 advanced 14 tech 81 general 81 youth 21 if you have a renewed your membership please do so next one in fact by popular demand we’re going to have a half gram technician hand-ground will be at Mill springs Academy Saturday September the 19th so any but it’s not licensed you can email at ham cram at Norfolk org to sign up and look at the information out to you very good at nicks lunch of mine might Birmingham is Mike here oh yeah anyway we do have a great Ares norful Daenerys amateur radio emergency services they have a net every Saturday night occasionally a one-day night when Z like to sign a night thats a turd you didn’t know that’s the that’s the last strike I’ll see you later and they’ve been participating in a number of things individuals help work to peachtree road race they work the georgia highway 400 hospitality bike run i guess that’s what they call her then and also the the fireworks display done it as many needs in Sandy Springs yes thank you Jim good old 13 colonies Jim thank you sir how many people first of all this just to get it out of the way how many people made at least one contact with Wonder than 13 colonies stations look at this this is a big event it is getting bigger thank you for participating now how many people make work all 13 colonies okay pretty good how many people work all 13 colonies and the two spatial stations pin and Great Britain 13 co l very good very good that’s great yeah Melanie is Tommy made contact sit and work all 13 right did a great job and the bonus stations to who doesn’t know what the thirteen colonies event is who just just raised me and I don’t even know what it is okay we’ve got one there you go see that’s how popular it is 13 colonies occurs once a year but around the first week in July covering July the fourth it covers about six days and there is a special event call sign in each state of the 13 original colonies Georgia me 10 let’s start with k2 there’s k to a through K 2 K 2 m we have K 2 g which is good because it matches our state of state some places don’t get that so you know if you got a new york or something you don’t get you don’t get the match there but there’s a couple of things that happen one is you work all 13 you actually work just one and you get a certificate but if you work all 13 you get the Clean Sweep and you can apply to Ken the organizer of it with five bucks and he’s very prompt and if you haven’t got how many people have gotten a certificate already a few people you get yours believe me he’s very very good so the I have the QSR l’s if you work k2g if you work one of the Georges nations and there were 19 stations that were on the air sometime during the week how many people were on as a k2g station okay look at this that’s because North Fulton competes as a club with clubs from other states we didn’t win but we did a good showing we had 4920 contacts of the 9000 made from Georgia were made by members of North

Fulton so their names are listed over here on the left and we have cards in the back of the room if you work Georgia you come back there and we’ll fill you out a qsl card after the meeting and I listed these particularly I want to call attention to nathan nathan is not here I don’t believe but k for NH Doug yet two things he made the most contacts he made over a thousand contacts in giving out k2g and he also designed the great qsl card how many people until maybe they saw the card or maybe just now didn’t realize that Ben Franklin paid a big role in the state of Georgia he was the kind of territorial governor what are you on called Africa what it is for the state of Georgia for six years and he resigned Zappos to go work on that whatever what we do today where we should be the declaration in the penetration seeing everybody could play this game anyway if you’d like if you didn’t work Georgia and you’d like a sample card you come back in the back of which will give you a sample card did ahead and by the way north york the North Georgia North Fulton F amateur radio league is the qsl manager for the whole state of Georgia and I and as of last week which is only a week or two after the contest we already had almost 400 applications for qso cards and how many more another 150 and this week this Saturday morning we’re having a qsl party at my house to work on those any questions about thirteen colony get ready gets a lot of fun right it’s a lot of fun it’s huge and this year on all 13 colonies and the two spatial stations over 127,000 contacts were made so a lot of people had a lot of fun but thanks to everybody that played I still don’t think the Great Britain station was there trp where way he called me and asked me to work some of the guys that were sitting there we know this is another fish story she’ll know I just jumped right into your log sure did actually okay activities John thank you as you can see we have lots of activities going on have gone on and coming up in the summer things slow down a bit but we do have the Huntsville hamfest August fifteenth and sixteenth you can google that line the details it’s probably one of the largest in the southeast on your calendars out a few months but a big event is to Girl Scout set stem science technology engineering and math October 24th of Saturday a lot of the why else in the club kind of coordinated this with the help from some of the other guys and hams and it’s a good show for the Girl Scouts and I’m going to go last meeting I handed out awards for Georgia qso party some of you were absent but I see a lot of you here tonight so I’d like to recognize some of the accomplishments k for RAB I think I saw Rick black here front center young man the first place single operator low-power phone Cobb County rookie class and person and let’s stay in Cocke County second place single operator low-power phone KJ for Vienna mark Bowman and right behind him third place Cobb County single operator low-power phone bill read k 4 y ji I know you had a bunch of contacts speaking of a bunch of contacts one member from our top rover team which scored the most points WK for you stroke and 4G I thought I saw Tim earlier there is first place for multi operator a little power CW rover thank you sir and the first place single operator qrp phone overall rookie km for jtt david drumm this one snuck in on the deadline ac for PA Pavel who was a rover qrp CW

first place single operator you’re pretty shimmery participating and getting the scores in our next slide shows that the cup club finished first place top Georgia club scored Northland amateur radio league I thank all the participants in the challenge we had a good time and there’s one participant a club member who placed first single operator a low-power phone and that’s Chaz cone who’s here tonight w for gk f and chaz is one of the coordinators at the team runs the website and works with norman they do a great job here you go and I think you have a word okay clearly the Georgia qso party is a popular function in the world and especially here in our poll I couldn’t be prouder of you guys who gals who work so hard on it’s not easy to put on and as you see up there this seems to be a plaque for the winner of the 2015 georgia club sadly there is no such thing as a plaque that’s just off the website but what there is is another humor is one more time the winning club score for Georgia goes to normal the g QP has been around for 54 years and for the last 10 narf old has one except for 2012 even know why they lost in 2012 yeah doesn’t stand by and give their cubs a chance since then and this year your total score was 960 3443 points12 in recorded history and if you don’t get a million in 2016 shame on you just like a radio guy what’s to hear the phone with it hey guys this is a great thing and now you’re wondering why we wonder two people wanted people to practice calling CQ contest this stuff like this is Wyatt it’s great to be number one it’s good to be none thank you so much as I thank you John you through August it’s a mystery program our power program disappeared on us and the Scots worked very hard to get another program lined up he is he has a candidate that looks like it’s going to come through it’s somebody that’s in the radio business and I think you’ll be glad to hear from up and I’m not going to make the announcement just yet

Uncategorized

In Focus – The Value of Photography Festivals

well thank you for being with us and keeping awake after lunch as well and thanks to Malcolm and everyone at street level for looking after so well today and all the photographers that came to see us at the reviews as I was good fun and so I’m gonna try and keep its 10 minutes but real old-timer on and how many people have been to format oh right so system not as many as I had hoped for but you’re very welcome to come and see us in the future there was only down the road a short flight to east midlands airport or Birmingham it’s easy smudge he’s led you yes okay so former em I set format up in 2004 and I came to Darby in 2001 also just after I completed my curating MA but before then I’d studied as an artist and I’ve been working as an artist for about five six years and I’d set up a darkroom live and work in Nottingham still then but I got this job in Derby as the job share and place called Q arts and on the horizon with quad but at the same time when I can start working in Darby of looking to the history of the city and uncovering what used to happen there and understanding Darby’s photographic history is a few facts on the screen there about kind of the the heritage of photography in the city which you know most most cities around around the country can claim on but you had some really particular things like one of the first places where you could come and study creative and documentary photography outside of London and it was one of the go-to places and still is Darby dub university has a great course of course and and also there used to be a photo festival there that ended in 97 sadly but so the kind of building on the legacy of this in 2004 when I start to get my teeth into the program and understand the partnerships in the city and alongside that I was beginning to understand about the range of different things the zeitgeist of 2004 is kind of looking back after doing the festival for around ten years and kind of thinking about what was it in 2004 that really kind of instigated our ideas one thing was the history of photography in the city but another thing was I suppose the kind of rise of open source in the beginning of blogs and and photographers getting their own websites and this kind of like burgeoning field online where you could come and see a whole range of photography without having to travel that far and so when I did my MA I was still you know writing essays by hundin kind of dealing with photo books as their main source of information but in 2004 they’re kind of the internet was as a massing thousands and thousands of images you know we’re far beyond that today but 2,000 for was a very special year and there was there’s quite a lot of organizations that started the Facebook started flickr started then canvas photo festival started then format started then um Marcus chardon start is photo book organization and so on and all these other things here so it’s kind of likely the global network started to to happen and we found it really like a fortuitous time for us to kind of reach out and do our first open course so the kind of ingredients were so similar to some of the things that we still do today which is exposure which is an international open core focus which is a program of us inviting photographers for commissions and solo shows and us collaborating with other curators and photography organizations from around the world the first festival was really we’re really naive we haven’t been to that many photo festivals before and so it’s myself Mike Brown from Derby City Council jessamy from Darby University and the head of the department at the University as well we came together and we decided to do it right alongside with Mark durden as well I used to work at Derby University and there was a creative camera conference that was touring around so it went to the media museum in bradford ships coming to darby university and then it was going on to tate britain and this was like a survey of photography from from the early kind of early days of photography in the UK through to present so in the middle we had the kind of the focus on their 80s and 90s a photographer and we made the most of that opportunity so in 2004 we instigated the festival named it format designed our logo got a little bit of money together to make it our first website and did an open call and then the festival actually have been in 2015 but in the run up to it we got a bit of money from the Arts Council just to do a few goes and see visits so we had about 5,000 pounds we made that spread as far

as we possibly could and the rest of the festival was built on goodwill partnerships across the city identify anyone who’s been to Darby is a small city and kind of similar things it would refer to my other speakers today we do rely on the community involvement we and we involve schools and colleges from around the region as well as in the city we need to work with the city council the county counts or businesses and you can see from the backs of our programs the whole range of different partners that we have here but our core partners are Derby City Council and the University then quad came along so one of the reasons i started working in Derby is that I knew that quad was going to happen so it took us eight years to build it you know open in 2008 and it’s a great contemporary center for art and film and that’s that’s the headquarters I’m the artistic artistic director there but format is a project that we do on on top of the program and embedded within it as well so quad is a we have three cinemas and the cafe and the artist studio and production spaces it’s a great kind of multipurpose center for contemporary art with a photography bias mainly because I you know it works very well in the city and I influence that through you know the program of format as well and it also allows us to to collaborate with all the staff members in the organization we’re not overly resourced will always have to look for money every time we do the festival every year we have a struggle to raise them raise the resources we have a rather small core budget for the festival but that only covers sabar who’s at the back there recording as a coordinator which is fantastic is the first year actually we’ve been able to keep a coordinator on in the off year as well and so this is that kind of menu of things that we do is very similar to a lot of other photo festivals so open call international open call we have Commission’s residency is a really big education program must participation programs which is maybe a little unique flavor to our program also performative elements and always look for kind of what live elements we can bring into the festival as well so each year we’ve had something quite dynamic so especially in the year that we focused on on factory and mass production and collaboration we had live sites of production we had the human printer with us who are printing images by hand and a whole range of different performative works as well so you can check out all our previous years on the fat on the festival website we are themed festival we found that having a theme was a useful device to have because we could focus the conference we could theme the publication on it we could and guide the the focus of the open-call is a challenge actually to find a theme that’s broad enough so one you had photo cinema this year we had evidence previous years you’ve had factory of a documentary memory in place or range of different themes and it’s always there always a debate and it’s a real challenge to choose a theme two years in advance that it’s going to be relevant you know when the time comes but sometimes when you commit to something then other things start to collect coalesce around it in it and it makes you make it make sense it’s the only option so we have conferences we have a photo book market we also support and develop photo books and photo films as well and so we have you know a decent amount of attendees some of them are online some of them are through the participation programs that we have some mass participation collaborations with Facebook and Instagram and IM and other kind of emerging online platforms and apps and we’ve been running more format for several years we started mob format before mobile phones were really useful tools for taking photographs but now they’re really fluid and we a lot of people engage with photography and through mobile platforms as well so we get involved with mobile photography quite a bit here’s some images from the festival this year if you didn’t manage to come and but the website is quite a good archive and you can go back through the different festivals so we we also talked to photographers and then the participating curators and collaborators about what other skills they’ve got maybe they can cook they can perform we found out that one of the artists dads it was a Elvis impersonators they performed on the opening night of the first of all which is fantastic and was had mini click doing a photo zine photo book zine where you could come and create a photo book and select your pages and all those are documented we had facebook and instagram doing kind of pop up photo booth where you could do mug shots in relation to the evidence theme we also have you know seriously researching and curated exhibitions in our gallery spaces so quad is one of the main hubs for the festival which is great it’s quite unique thing to actually have a you know kind of a heavyweight Center to be kind of a main hub for the festival which is all year round as well but was to collaborate with the museum and art gallery and we also develop other spaces so as we heard before about people being excited to come into spaces that have been shut for years we hope we worked with a with a estate agent and a

property developer who helped us kind of tell us which venues are going to be empty and what what we could get potentially a little bit further in advance than normal often then you pop up venues you can’t get them guaranteed more than a month in advance which is a real problem when you’re programming artist wonder what I want to know what space they’ve got to work with curators want to know that you know the dimensions and everything but the estate agent doesn’t want to let you have it because they might get some money on it or they might want to rent it out they don’t want to commit to a festival and we’re asking it asking for it in kind but then also the benefits for the estate agent is that it opens up a space and for example the church that we worked with this year and had been shut for nine years and now it’s being converted into a burger bar which is you know the estate agents happy we’re not happy because we wanted to use it in the future but any others good for the local economy I guess and so that’s going to kind of the theory of why we organize festivals and and also because we need to articulate this quite often to our funders and their our regional bodies our national bodies and so on and also the kind of potential sponsors and festivals different from a collection of exhibitions and seasons are there are an opportunity to take and to be more experimental and to include really high-profile artists alongside emerging photographers who deserve as much exposure and they’re a place where people can really test out new ideas try different ways of showing things outside and indoors outside and experiment with what photography isn’t can be and that’s one of the formats traplines well hello and when we say Lewis cantilever London I’m the director of photo island I just want to come in with use a little bit about what we have been doing photo island was founded in 2009 as an organization that will promote critical discussion on photography we started the first festival in 2010 and since then we celebrate a festival every year in July this is this year was the sixth edition of photo island and we produce a catalogue every year and the last edition is floating around right now you can have a look so you can see the contents of the of this year we had a usually with we have a number of exhibitions are on darling between 1450 exhibitions but in 2013 we reached Limerick and cork for a very specific project was new artists works which was our intention in I suppose raising a bit of awareness on artists photographers so the little attention that we have had internationally we turn it around on us and we produce a book the new Ice Works book and the nearest work exhibition there was seven exhibitions around 33 cities and then we brought the works to to Paris to party photo well to some of the events around party photo and then to and seen a festival so we were trying to bring these these names abroad and so people were able to to start to name is photographers I think it’s not something that is quite been now it’s easier but when you know when I when I told abroad and I asked people can you name a nice whatever they they rarely can sometimes suppose they can say the convention richard mosse because he has become very popular but not even the the well-established photographers were you know so it wasn’t an intern interesting push I think he helped a little bit but usually we are based in Dublin and we run the festival in Dublin so we pull is some books and one of them was Martin part of his books of the decade that was part of an exhibition in 2011 when we celebrated the first book of mice in fair in Temple Bar dedicate it to photography and this pushed to the 22 to promote the photo book as a form to to show photography was in a way to acknowledge the the fact that there was a boom on the photo book but also how inexpensive it can be for photographers to to use that platform to promote their own work so we work with Martin part to make a selection of 30 books and we produce this book we had an exhibition where the local bola visitors could access these 30 books with exceptional of one there was a holy projected on a screen because too expensive to display but we allow the visitors to actually touch the books and two there was no cotton gloves just grab the book and

feel it and in many cases break it but for us it was essential the people could actually see the value of having the book in front of them so this book sold out very quickly of course and and I think he became a little jewel that is floating there in space we saw the exhibition in Castle this year the couple months ago we’re marking part was showing all the books that he has published and also the ones as he has edit or coolest and this book was there and it was a very interesting to see them but of course we also police the numerous works and this is a book that was I think was fairly useful for us to to use as a as a as a reason scarred for what’s happening in Ireland when we travel abroad so we have in promoting the 25 photographers that are here but also a sense of you know there is something very exciting happening in Ireland and you have seen maybe with the books of a darmowe with emond oil and some other books there is a some really good photography coming from Ireland and some needs needs to be discovered and it’s being discovered so one of the latest place that we had was greetings from Ireland it’s a collection of postcards by 40 photographers based in Ireland again an intention to to promote the local artists to to enter that kind of currency of images from the tourist trade mostly because we are basing in Temple Bar and our headquarter the library project and I will talk about it in a moment it’s right in front of the biggest souvenir shop in Ireland so we thought you know it’s nice to see the cliffs of moher and some patrick’s cathedral but you know what what’s Island you know how will you saying how will you send a more realistic greeting from Ireland so and we made a collection of these 40 images that you can see in a moment when we pass by those postcards you need and they’ve got quite fun and you know the quite irreverent at times there they’re showing crossroads in a small towns where nothing happens they’re showing showing tourists under the rain so you know something I’d be more realistic but in a sense it’s allowing people to consume these images and also to consume the names of the artists so again to to put these Irish artists names on people’s heads essential so then we arrived to the library project and the library project was born as an idea from 2011 from this first book and magazine third that originated the Martin powerbook we contacted a lot of publishers to develop this book book and magazine fair but we asked them to donate the books tu tu tu foto Ireland one of the main problems of developing Madison fair sorry boo commands in fair in I is that everybody’s on holidays and also you know people find it very difficult to to come to Ireland you know if they’re out of Europe so for us it was easier to actually request some sample books so and so we did and we quickly made a massive collection of very meaningful books that will show the state of the current state of the photo book industry that collection and was a name that every project because we thought eventually this could be a library all these books should be should be you know we should keep up with the collection and I collect over time and eventually offer it to to the public so in 2013 we managed to get space that is where we are today is a this is space in Temple Bar part of the of a printed studios a billion a building that was developers apprentice to do so this is the ground floor right in the in a city center in the temple bar area so we have a gallery downstairs and a bookshop and the mezzanine upstairs with our collection of books it is quite unusual to have a such a space in in suppose in the Torah statistics center of city specifically you know in terms of the library but i think it’s a it’s a great opportunity for us to be in a space in a location where without much of an effort people can pass by and enjoy the collection so instead of us going to everywhere we are right in the center and people can come to us with before this location we tried others and you know it was quite clear that we have to be at the center of the city so who uses

this collection well mostly students for the refers some professionals that are doing research of course a lot of tourists come and have a look and they you know they enjoy it but it’s mostly am yeah I’m saying people are interested in in the in photography and they want to look for particular books it’s a man is an incredible space were to sit down and research so we just have finalized so talking about this year we had Dominic how good as the first the main exhibition in in the owner John gallery and I just wanted to finish on on showing his work I don’t know if you are aware of his work but he’s very interesting because I think he talks a lot about where photography could be going and everything that he does in the gallery space has been thought out from the light into of course the hanging he ended up making this high-end you know very stylized images from the next step I suppose it was well if I can if they need is to control the image it took to do something that is pure is there anything more control than actually render an image so he actually render a bottle that was used in one of the events to with you know some Holly water to spray so rendering this bottle in the in the computer I’m presenting it as a surrender you know as if he was an image which is in the back of the catalog you can see it but the ultimate step is actually too well if he’s rendering is perfect why can you not print it you know then just bring it back to the to the to the real world and make these 3d print and this is what we show in the space in w so we showed up 3d printer bottle mounted on a on the wall in a very particular way alongside two other pieces in a particularly particularly lead gallery super control in terms of the delight I think interesting look at a photography and I think it’s very interesting reflection that maybe i just dropped there but I leave it there hello and hello I’m Alan this is julian and with Carlyle fought off festival and so I’ll just go straight into it so and the first festivals 2012 and it was put together mainly out of us it set off from University this group of 30 of us studying and University of Cumbria together we had five exhibitions that we needed to put on outside of the university and without any help or strings on things from them and so we’ve found that the best way to go about it for us at the time with it being five separate exhibitions who wanted to help each of them wanted to do the advertising and things like that so money always comes down to these things so we thought we’d put it together into one umbrella the Carlile photo festival so the five exhibition spread across the city centre and we’d help bounce off each other and support each other in with that advertising money maps bounce and the people who are coming to see the exhibition’s to won’t see the other ones encourage them to go on and view the work around the city centre and one of the other things that were really interested in doing with am using unusual spaces who wanted to go outside of that white-walled gallery and environment and really look at places that might encourage people to crush it across the threshold and comment look at art and so we used like as you can see here the same a shipping crate yeah and which workers which was put into town centre and it captured people’s interest and to come and see what we were doing what what the work was about speak to the artists we were all around about and in different areas and so one of the other spaces that we used was an office space this and you have the images sort of floating if people were just walking around and in between them so that was it’s about reusing spaces that are empty that that was that was an office space that had been empty for about five or six years so we were just going around and asking and calling in all the favors that would possibly could of all of the people that we knew because we didn’t have any money as students the other space if you use thick places like gay bars there was one of the bars with them built-in walls and things to create whole new spaces so it became more of an

installation than just and exhibitions just photographs on the walls and things so it was really repurposing and reusing or emphasizing the spaces that we were looking at so and we decided we got quite a lot good feedback from that year decided there was something we wanted to carry on doing the opening out to more photographers and give them the opportunity that we’d started so we held an open call that would international we had quite a lot of them interest in that we have people from all over the world Egypt Poland Finland France a lot of UK local people and again some of the people from the previous year and and keeping in mind this idea of unusual spacious so we used for example down the bottom there that’s them it used to be the old post office in Carlisle it’s currently well it now is a hotel and there in the middle of doing the renovations and things there so you kind of went into the building site the interesting thing about using those kind of spaces especially the old post office for example and the local people wanted to know what it was like it’s quite noisy the were like ah remember it’s been shook for years and wanted to come in to see the space initially and they were thing and then once illyrian you’ve got them so they go oh I only came in to see what you know where the old post office was but actually this is really interesting you know where where else is there what else is going on I didn’t realize this we were talking to the artists talking to us so you got started that dialogue with people local people as well as given opportunities for these for the photographers and artists new things this is when it started to get a lot we started to make it a lot bigger last year the the dark picture and the top right hand side and that was an old courtroom for the eighteen hundreds and it hasn’t been there’s been no courts know when courts held there since about nineteen eighty-five so a lot of people in Carlisle had never been in it unless of course they’d been naughty entered whatever and we used the also you access the prison’s below through the cold and we utilized those spaces to exhibit works well so really we were saying to people come in and have a look at this space that you haven’t seen before or haven’t seen for a long time and come and have a look at the work and the work that we did there was a community project well those two sort of projects going on there one was called our Carlile which is where we asked people to bring photographs that they were that they felt was important to them in their relationship with Carlile and the bottom the bottom at the bottom images of a student exhibition I was getting them University of Cumbria back involved and things so they’ve put together an exhibition to pull alongside of past present students and all of their work in a new gallery space that’s opening up in there in the university then so you can see here the train station train station and virgin rail we’re on our side now I’ll have ever loved we loved them and really easy to talk to you think that’s the kind of a company like that might be hard to UM to approach in the first place but actually you find you don’t ask you don’t get and there’s no harm in asking so when we went and said without an idea what do you think and he was like yeah great you know what can we do to help and they were doing our thought it was brilliant so and the bottom long image there you can see that same street level and across the bridge and we had work in the other and those are the two waiting rooms so you find you catch people and who may be just commuting going changing trains doing things like that all hadn’t even known that the vessel was on finding that the walking across the bridge you go Oh what’s this you go well okay there’s a maps go and find the rest of the stuff little treasure hunt through Carlisle see what else you can find another thing we would kind of keep in mind as you dates and times and things like that the bottom photo down Tony house we did a slideshow on Bonfire Night which it was it was just before we’d actually started the intercultural and festival itself but Carlyle fireworks is quite a big event in Carlisle and there was fourteen thousand people walk past just this ruse alone walking past Tully house and we had examples of everybody’s work where was going to be at what things were going on and your logos and things from the people who’ve supported as you can see street-level University cumbrian things there and you think that’s just

one night 14,000 so it’s quite getting the papers and all the rest yeah we like to sort of piggyback on two events so that you’ve got law audience there already and the audience is that wider participation the wider audience all the times about trying to get more and more people to look at look at the artwork and get involved and I’ve also been getting funding for bursaries and we had 3 500 pound bursaries available and 22 of which the bottom two artists they had their work pretty healthy went towards printing and things like that they could show that work and in the festival and the top on that she will be an exhibit uh but also on the top they’ve started to use and for how we have a google trusted photographer who does panel to us so and we’ve got panel to us for their exhibitions for last year to act as an archive so you’ll actually be able to digitally walk through the exhibition’s after they’ve been taken down and to help with with two things people for access people couldn’t make it on things like that but also am sure the work in in the actual space is yes port and it’s surprising how much goes into into it and how many people you find help out and things got quite a lot of these people we’ve had a Spartan kind farming and all the different I think you kind of touched and support already but and this is just to give you an idea as to the wide range of sort of different organizations that you can sort of work out a partnership with or who you know who can support you or you can apply for funding from and I think this is just probably just the tip of the iceberg I mean that was last year but as we as we go forward I could imagine that this will get bigger and bigger it’s from coming out with this as well that would fare now collaborating with visualizing conferences and also we have a traveling exhibition on at the moment and they have academic conferences every two years in the University of Cumbria so we do the vizio and did the open call for that and had the actual work to go with the academic conference and this will be traveling throughout the year and in Durham at the moment in the Botanic Gardens tweening Carlisle and looking for a few of the places that we’re going to workington variants about finished finishes in workington doesn’t in term Easter next year so thanks Malcolm first of all for biosphere and thanks for your support during our festival this year and we’re the new kids on the block I suppose that it’s kind of this is our first year so remote focal is dedicated to photographers creating work on the remote or rural context that’s actually a really wide brief is not just about rural it can be a by a photographer who’s based in the city and goes to a remote context that it can be available the subject of your photos being remote we looked at some work this morning portfolio reviews which is city-based but actually fitted with the kind of things that we’re talking about so it’s kind of you know connected widely but also it’s connected to our place we’ve done our goals for the North West of Ireland is kind of on the periphery of Ireland is on the periphery of Europe and and you know we just kind of hoop we just set it up to kind of bring the photo community to Donegal and to kind of raise the bar culturally with in Donegal as well and so as a first year this year and this center of everything is the artist so is to support develop and promote artists and photographic photographic artists and the big thing is we chant before and somebody mentioned community and I was really happy because that’s a really big part of it is kind of its that exchange which is the most kind of important thing I think is when people get together and discuss and exchange ideas and it helps them move forward and when you’re living kind of remotely it can be hard you lose contact with those kind of conversations and so it’s to try and create something there the great thing we found this year is a lot of people Kim into Donegal which is a beautiful place as well but then they’re kind of felt captive and they felt kind of connected that way as well so it was kind of nice because they were in a different environment and it meant that they were happy to count all come together some kind of group so and yeah I’ll show some pictures yeah so we live Kenna is very revoke this beach I love five minutes for the speeches The Times calls this the world’s second most beautiful beach that’s my tourism pitch and at HBO for beach but this is just like some of ah rests on the Saturday afternoon just went off for a tour around and wrote something an beiträge quite nice and sensitives but so it’s kind of it’s like a destination idea as well there’s kind of not just going there for photography

we’re going for the community and it’s something different is something more to see they’re really you know and and it’s kind of you know we’re kind of like the smaller sibling to Belfast and Dublin you know where can it saying those guys have this amazing kind of city buzz and it’s kind of huge and we kind of want to like work with those guys but not compete with them because it’s a very different offering to see to where we are and so we just trying to lean and what we have there and kind of work with people that way and this is Fort honry which is amazing kind of locations in old military base and Donegal in Los Feliz that’s the Atlantic Ocean and we had an American street photographer demoz arrays was an exhibition in there so we have kind of quite powerful kind of locations as well we went cross-border as well which is very big thing in Donegal Northern Ireland so this is the social studios and galleries Barry and they had it just by chance really we were trying to set something up with them they had a Tracy Tracy Peters is a Canadian photo and video artist was doing a residency so we programmed her into the festival as well so it’s just trying to bring in interesting venues interesting content we’re very lucky to have this amazing facility this is the regional cultural center in their account in Donegal it’s a bit of a Celtic Tiger kind of throw bags when the boom time happens and Dublin few these popped up around the country but we’re really lucky because it’s this amazing venue so for a first year we had kind of the lower floor of this area which enabled us to do a lot and then 2016 where we have the whole building so it has like huge gallery space and lots of workshop areas lots of smaller spaces as well for exhibit so love opportunites you a lot of work and bring people together so we’re kind of lucky and try not to waffle how so content I’m not going to go through all that but it’s a she was 21 events over four days and the brochure that’s gonna come out there it’s kind of showing you the different kinds things your talks workshops exhibitions and if I just bring some pictures of that kind of shoe so we had a group show of kind of emerging artists so we had kind of seven people alex boyd from Scotland was one of those and and some of that was kind of a fairly recent work and some of his completely brand-new work so the prints on the wall area of that modern and that was the first time she kind of shown her work so again everyone’s going to obsess new work I suppose but it’s kind of nice opportunity for people to come and that kind of intimate atmosphere to kind of test I things and decide too short for the first time without any real kind of pressure this is the amazing gallery that will have the use of next year and so it’s kind of great facility and Donovan Wiley gave a great kind of entertaining talk and discussion as part of the festival got quite a hard time from some of the cried which is quite interesting and but it made for a kind of lively thing and he you know some people may have seen Donna but he brings something kind of unique this is very interesting so we had and three artists who collectively they’re all doing PhD research at the moment and very different viewpoints into women and photography but they come together and call themselves the feminist lens when they present and so they came and did a talk they and had a great expression and then laurel corner is also performance artist so in the building and the launch in the friday night she was doing a Wi-Fi link into the main gallery and people hadn’t drinkin a beer and stuff and she does her alter ego performance inc but she’s somewhere else in the building so it kind of adds another layer as well and we like that kind of thing that kind of add something else to it so and and this is just discussion this is the street photographer over at fort on me and and we had a kind of remote edition of full book club so we had three photographers here different stage in different routes into full book and we had till quickly he was just sort of starting the process of picking in the book together with katie nolan who brought lots of different dummies to show the process of what you’ve gone through with their designer and then we had Karen Oh Arnold who the week before which claire had that he won the Mac first book award and so with really great content and we’ve got a designer in to kind of bring that kind of you on as well so very kind of connected discussions as well about how people get their work out there and how they present it I kind of thing and then we also given where we are we have to reach out into the community as well and you know people are more aware photography as an art form I suppose but we had things like DLI photo book with sy on-site workshops street photography master classes that kind of thing so trying to put more content in there for

everybody and and then a big factor that we had was remote price someone will movie discuss later things like you know how you get new work into your festival the idea of autumn submissions and that kind of thing we decided the first year certainly to go not to go with an open submissions and and there are reasons for that when we discussed earlier but we decided to go for a nomination system so we had the remote prize we had seven nominators one of which was Malcolm an H nominated for artists and then those ours came from all over Europe to buy us and then each one of those kind of gets highlighted on the website and you can kind of look at the work that way and and then we shortlisted 7r knows seven arts or premiered after Donovan’s talk and the kind of opening event of the festival and then our winner matt black which is quite myself one of her fits a real name were not n am he’s from california and so his winning the prize he then we’ll come to donegal next year and exhibit his work and as part vessel and I think there’s a few pictures here yeah so these are some of the shots that were in just a few samples that were in the shortlisted ones and then you should be matte black yeah it’s just a handful pictures and it’s quite interesting this process as well as a new festival and how you go about this and the panel that choose these work and I probably would not have thought we would have chosen something like this setting out on the journey but it’s just something about this work kept coming back up coming back up and yeah and then opportunity so we’re quite pride in the way we did a lot in a kind of short space time first year so we’ve sort of 58 RS involved so there was 20 involved in the remote prize and then another 30 were involved either in group shows solo shows and talks workshops that kind of thing we did have a small amateur stroke student competition I shall just dip in a row to win to that idea of people submitting I had a really really low kind of entry cost which is to cover printing we actually another 30 people had their work shown in an exhibition of just a print exhibition and and you know the whole thing about the festival I put their mutual benefits the key so we had virtually new budget this first year so we were kind of saying feel if it works for you then we want you there but you know what it’s trying to work to make sure that the people showing and taking part they’re getting something out of it as well and we don’t want to be going over or giving you a great opportunity to show your work we want it to be something that benefits the artist as well and and then the future plan is to develop sustainable model we were having a great discussion about funding and stuff over lunch and that’s a big factor but I think there’s a bigger discussion to come about how you fun festivals and how you keep them sustainable and for us we see a vision of maybe we get funding for a few years time but then we want to create a model that is self-sustaining and also ers as well so you the artists are getting paid to show their work and it’s kind of that’s to me is a vital aspect and we have a way to go with that so but that’s kind of it in a nutshell I think oh no sorry support yeah so support is really important so we had the gallery photographer Dublin were huge support Donovan was huge support the local venue is great Democrat people like Malkin we just came on board and Malcolm it said when he realized with no budgets it will all come up my cost to you I’ll do a talk I’ll nominee so huge kind of wealth of support Peter Neil’s that be a director and Belfast and he came he framed his own pictures he brought them here he hung them we taken aback himself he also huge my goodwill to get his kind of started getting going and yeah and that’s kind of roughly it come to donegal 2016 so am I the order of minus is slightly different to to the ones that weren’t before and I’m really starting at the at the very beginning and when i’m michael whereby the web director of belfast photo vessel which I started 2009 and when I started when I was thinking about the festival I was actually on a ship and at the time I was kind of about working out in America as a photographer and and when I was at University and I’d organized a lot of events and in the year afterwards that organized a lot of exhibitions in Belfast and I knew I wanted to do something a lot bigger and photographic best and I was just trying to I was trying to work out what that would be I am and I and I suppose that there was a number of things going through my head while I was while I was out there and I was thinking about the fact that been no major photographic event in Northern Ireland or the Republic of Ireland and at the time for photography as full of Ireland as well

hadn’t had launched to the following year and there was no visual arts festival at all no representation in terms of a festival for the visual arts in Northern Ireland at the time and I was also of course the way the northern island had purchased some highly regarded photographers such as your your dunivan Wiley’s in your and your highness turkeys and I came back and after being on the ship and I suppose you know a lot of people ask me why would you want to start a festival what people thought it was a bit crazy and and but I started to talk to a lot of galleries I started to talk to a lot of museums and photographers and I just find that people kind of felt it was the right time and in talking to people I find actually in the late 80s there was a group that wanted the same group that launched Belfast exposed photography gallery and source photographic review and which had been running since the late eighties wanted to launch a festival but they couldn’t they felt it wasn’t the right time because there’s a lot of violence in the city there’s a lot of trouble but a lot of that was dying dying and when I came back like Northern Ireland was coming out of a golden age of photographer it’s been described as such especially in terms of press photography there’s a lot of photographs being taken by photographers and Northern Ireland of the troubles there was a lot of photographs by being taken by photographer from abroad m of the troubles so there was this giant golden age of imagery constantly coming out of there of the country and I suppose I was reflecting on the fire that it was it was plan a real key role in kind of documenting our history and that was playing a real important role in our history so that was something that kind of should be recognized and at the time of course at Belfast exposed the source photographic review were there were already and putting on exhibitions at publishing a photography so there was already a kind of BS there there was that bamf am PhD course was just launched at the University of Ulster when policy right and moved from from teaching at Newport and so I knew already that there you know every year there was going to be new talent coming out of the University for him from this from this great course and so I was going to have work the exhibit in the future as well as colleges there was more photography courses and being taken up in the college’s so that was really important of course for the future of a major festival and I’m not only that but and there was already a BS of photography clubs I think they’re all over the UK as well and there’s a lot of clubs in other over a hundred and I knew already that was kind of a platform and a base from which to grow from so so that was amazing seriously ok and this year actually ok here’s some images and just from from the fact that past two festivals and and this year and we run the festival the third edition under the theme of convergence and this title and this theme kind of came about through through a variety of thinking I suppose I’d realized that photography hadn’t officially been recognized as an art form for very long and I was also when traveling to a lot of festivals and attended a lot of exhibitions I started to see a trend more and more of photographers and artists experimenting with the medium and kind of do using it with performance and with writing with filim with sculpture and with painting and I find this very interesting just hi people were kind of diversifying and using the medium and kind of crossing it with other art forms and I thought this is important for the future of the meeting I thought Wars that’s leading where the barriers where the boundaries are the barriers and boundaries and through these crossovers and I thought it was something that was certainly with discussion and we’re looking out through the festival and so these these three images actually just represent three of a number of approaches that we took to this theme of convergence and we have worked in the far left here by Alma Hayes are and who would have used a photograph and kind of folded it up into almost a piece of origami and then placed it on a copy of the original to create this kind of surrealistic Cyclops I call cycle cycles like portrait and and then in the bottom right here we’ve got a work by yung Lee South Korean artists the very first time she was exhibited in the UK and she would actually build these large elaborate installations again very surreal that she would then place herself in with the the photograph actually being the kind of finished product so this is another example we’d actually looking again photography and sculpture we tried to we tried to do something a bit unusual actually commissioned this pace by and french artist Cyril hat and this is the most ambitious piece that he’s ever done and we did it with him local photographer and two local sculptors and the whole idea was that we wanted to kind of really push the public’s perception of what was possible with the photographic medium and a lot of people actually thought this was a real car which is crazy but it’s of course completely made up of photographs printed on sheets of plate aluminum and it’s currently on turret the minute and we built it not just for any reason many of you may not know but the DeLorean was actually built in Belfast so it’s kind of a really important part of our history that were

kind of proud of but like the Titanic that psyche is a failed car that we all like to celebrate so but of course you know it’s also because it was the 35th anniversary of the cars official unveiling this year and it’s also of course the year that Marty McFly went to the Future in the second back to the future film and it’s a course a piece of pop culture there’s going to people you know the general public are really going to be able to relate to its way for them to engage with the festival for us to use it as a promotional vehicle excuse the pun in the city center and really make people aware that the festival is taking place and this this sculpture alone saw by 35,000 people engaged with it and which is amazing and people were it was all over social media and and for the festival and really push in people’s perception of photography I think it worked it worked very well for us we also actually worked with 150 of the former employees that used to build the cars on this on this project and this is actually it looks like it worked in it you can see it better there is a piece of street art that were commissioned by a group called mental gassy from Berlin and again I doors we wanted to bring more and more the festival outdoors get the public engaging with the festival we find that not enough people were going into the galleries and a lot of people still find galleries very intimidating so we wanted to try and get past that and bring photography to the people and again this was something that was very popular and and when we saw over all over social media so again bring a work outdoors we actually built a photo park I made up of 13 cargo containers on a number of wooden cabins and to host a variety of exhibitions and it was the largest visual art largest display of Visual Arts is certainly I’m ever ever wear of taking place in Northern Ireland and for us it was all about an accessible space that attract that that the families can go to the general public isn’t intimidating and the people can engage with photography and a kind of in a new way and again it’s over the over the course of the month 13,000 people came to this space and for us it was a real hub for the festival and a real place for us to kind of host host our own events and really give a kind of festival feel here’s just some examples of and the way we exhibited on the outside of the containers we built light boxes in the inside with humble magnets and also done kind of in screen projections so opportunities that the festival offers and one area that I suppose I feel that the professor was particularly strong is our subsidized master classes and in our first year and there was a there’s a masterclass by Simon Norfolk which was actually as so heavily subsidized it was free and there in 2013 we had Roger Ballen take a master class and this year we had a booth Lorenzo Vettori and Alex oath oh I also take master classes so what real strength and I think and as I say they’re subsidized and for us it’s all about giving the opportunity for Northern Irish photographers as well as photographer abroad to come and work for these these photographers are leading in their field and kind of benefit from their expertise advice and guidance and the time that they could spend with them okay and of course there’s well at portfolio reviews and many of you probably know what portfolios are all about probably been on them a real opportunity for you to meet with curators directors editors publishers and get valuable insight advice guidance and and valuable contacts of course as well and the possibility of getting a publication and exhibition in future we also am a top image i represent we we offer exhibition opportunities we invite photographers we Commission photographers but we also have our open submission and open submission is very important to us and previous years we’ve always had we had an open submission exhibition that we put in the real center of the city and but we’ve actually started to offer solo shows not I to the artists that we and choose through the open submission to give them individual spaces and so they get as much out of participating in the festival as possible in the bottom-right exhibition or an image representing and talks we offer opportunity course for artists and photographers to get to speak to a large audience about their work and it’s an image taken it from and stills photographer Helen Sloan in photographs for HBO’s Game of Thrones and a lot of people weren’t aware of the important role that she plays in the production of the program as it was a real opportunity for her to speak a better work for more people to be aware of how the import role at her and photography players in the production of the program and it was actually the very first time they’d HBO ever let and one of their heart photographers ever do a show so that was really good for us and I’m partnerships well-being been quite a large festival and we’ve got by 30 exhibitions but 60 events as 51 partners this year a lot of people feeding in you know having an input playing a role and within within this kind of the festival

we have public funders some examples there that of course the Arts Council the Belfast City Council private sponsors RS color her local printing company have you really been with us since the beginning and very much part of the festival 9 we have our cultural foundations like bridge console for example the support culture from Britain as well as other consoles that support culture from from other countries we have media partners like lens culture and ideas top or static ax event partners like HBO that we partner with on the on the Game of Thrones exhibition and veni partners of course that offer their spaces for exhibitions and events during the festival like Titanic Belfast or Queens film theatre that we used to screen films so that’s it thanks very much you

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Fields Of Faith – Poplar Bluff, MO – 2014 – Part 3

he has it okay man I am so excited to be here with you tonight my name is TJ Woodard I want to tell you three quick things about myself and then we’ll get away from that first off I and married to the absolutely most beautiful girl in the world inside and out so pork you know where you’re at she’s the best that’s big case you’re wondering um we have been youth pastors who you’re in Poplar Bluff for about six or seven years now and we get to work with a group called underground I don’t know where you guys are at we love it and we are just one of many many many teams of youth pastors that are here tonight so we’re we’re pumped to be here with you and originally I love Poplar Bluff don’t get me wrong I love Poplar Bluff but I am an Elsinore boy out from East Carter so shout out to the Redbirds right there um hey real quick if you are a leader of any kind if you’re a parent a lead pastor a youth pastor at FCA huddle leader or coach if you’re in any way responsible for young people real quick would you just stand up tonight can we see where you are real fast can we make some sleep indoors with these guys listen you are heroes okay we love you some of you I know you but those of you that maybe I haven’t got to meet just on behalf of the whole team that’s behind fields of faith let me just say thank you okay thank you we know what that church van or that school bus smells like so god bless your soul okay thank you so much for bringing students here tonight I’ll have time to tell a whole bunch of stories so I’m just going to tell one and it’s from the Bible okay I don’t know how you guys feel about the Bible but if you have a Bible and or bible app you can go ahead and turn and or swipe to mark chapter 5 okay mark five I’m gonna tell you one story and I don’t know how you feel about the Bible maybe you read it every day maybe you’ve never read it maybe you’ve never heard it or maybe you’ve already heard the story that i’m going to share tonight regardless either way cuz you guys give me like 15 minutes nope could you give me 15 minutes okay good perfect or nah you know whatever is cool I want to read you mark chapter 5 we’re going to read a big chunk of Scripture so try to read along or listen along i’m reading from the NLT if you want to know that it’s mark chapter 5 verse 2 through 17 says when Jesus everybody say Jesus when Jesus conned out of the boat a man possessed by an evil spirit came out from a cemetery to meet him this man lived among the burial caves it could no longer be restrained even with a chain whenever he was putting the chains and shackles as he often was he snapped the chains from his wrists and smashed the shackles no one was strong enough to subdue him day and night he wandered among the burial caves and in the hills howling and cutting himself with sharp stones when Jesus was still some distance or arrested Jesus when Jesus was still some distance way the man saw him ran to meet him and bowed low before him and with a shriek he screamed why are you interfering with me Jesus son of the Most High God in the name of God I beg you don’t torture me for Jesus had already said it to the spirit out of the man you evil spirit and then Jesus demanded what is your name and he replied my name is legion because there are many of us inside this man pretty ok and the evil spirits begged Jesus I can and again not to send them out to some distance place there happened to be a large herd of pigs feeding on the hillside nearby send us into those pigs the spirits bag let us enter them so Jesus gave them permission and the evil spirits came out of the man and entered the pigs excuse me um pardon me the entire herd of about two thousand pigs it’s a lot of bacon heaven ten thousand pigs plunge down the steep hillside into the lake and drowned in the water I noticed a crazy story so far right we got a demon-possessed dude we

got Jesus we got pigs now we got two thousand of them drowning in a lake filled with evil spirits this is crazy and the herdsmen fled to the nearby towns verse 14 and the surrounding countryside spreading the news as they ran people rushed out to see what had happened a crowd soon gathered around Jesus and they saw the man who had been possessed by the Legion of demons he was sitting there fully clothed and in his right mind perfectly sane and they were all afraid then those who had seen what had happened told the others about the demon-possessed man and the pigs and the crowd began pleading with Jesus to go away leave them alone can we pray real quick before we jump into this Jesus we love you we love your word let it come alive in us tonight let it change us help us God is surrender and to leave our darkness and our bondage help us to leave our comfort and our selfishness and to follow you for the rest of our life in Jesus name everybody said amen amen I want to ask you two questions tonight to your question ever say two questions the first question is this there’s anybody here anyone does anybody here have any bacon no I’m just kidding okay that’s not the first question I would eat it if you had it that would be weird but anyway if you’re just like cooking bacon in your seat you’re weird anyway um now here’s the first question I want you to ask them right next to you this question are you that guy ask somebody are you that guy if it’s a lady it was a lady say are you that girl okay are you that guy you say you say T didn’t take you that long ask that question you say TJ TJ what guy which God most of us probably don’t relate okay most of us probably don’t relate to a demon-possessed dude who smells like a graveyard and how is it people and breaks anything you try to hold him down with something guys like that sounds like my little brother right but most of us don’t relate to that we’re not maybe we don’t feel like we’re demon-possessed but seriously I want to ask you are you that God and you might surprise yourself what you think about it because the answer might be maybe here’s what we know about that guy he was alone nobody’s taking care of him why because they tried and they failed they can’t anymore he’s isolated he’s an outcast he’s been made fun of he’s been ridiculed I don’t know if kids weren’t you afraid to come around him but if they want they park threw rocks at him probably called him names might make fun of it right and nobody has had any answers for him and his situation they tried to help that keep him hurting yourself to keep from hurting other people and they can’t technically he’s free right like they try to chain him up and he breaks free so technically he’s free but he’s being driven to these terrible things and he’s hurting himself here’s what else we know we know that we don’t know exactly how he got there we just see as his state right here in this story but we can assume that he probably didn’t plan this right like he probably wasn’t an elementary school like what do you want to be when you grow up a howling mad man in the cemetery like that’s probably not how his life was supposed to go and so we see him that as strong as he is and as tough as he is he’s weak and he’s powerless to control himself he can’t stop himself he’s out of control I want to ask you again are you that guy are you an outcast are you isolated to people laugh at you you say TJ I got clothes on I live in a real house I’m not demon possessed praise Jesus okay what are you that God are you isolated have you been bullied because of stuff that you’ve done or who you are does it seem like nobody can help me like nobody has answers like people try giving you advice and it didn’t work are you technically free to do what you want but it feels almost like you can’t do what you want like you just keep doing terrible things to feel like you can’t stop like you can’t change like this is how it’s going to be this is how my life is going to unfold are you hurting yourself are you hurting people around you you feel like you just can’t get past your anger you can’t get past your urges you can’t get past your doubts maybe you’re here tonight you say TJ my life is going nowhere fast if that’s you friend Jesus is here and he wants to help you he loves you and let me tell you something your sins my sins

everything we’ve ever done wrong every wrong thought every MP remoted every bad action every time we tried to hurt someone every we’ve done the opposite of what God would want us to do all of that stuff separates us from God because he’s perfect and he wants nothing to do with sin and so because of that if nothing else happens to us we are doomed and the only way that it can be made right the only way we can have relationship with God again as if those sins were somehow paid for and we can’t pay for them because we’re not perfect or somebody perfect had to pay for them and he did his name was Jesus and he came to earth as God in the flesh and he lived a perfect life that he never sinned okay he died a gruesome death on a cross to pay for your sins all right and then after that he rose from the grave to prove that he was God and to give us new life in him somebody said amen that’s the gospel man right but check this out let me tell you if you say I’m that guy to dominate dark place you haven’t done too much you haven’t gone too far you’re not hopeless if you’re here tonight well god is giving you another opportunity to have a different future he’s calling you make you say TJ I don’t have it all figured out yeah I don’t know the Bible I don’t know all this stuff do you think that guy did he didn’t know anything in a moment with Jesus changed his life he ran and he fell at Jesus’s feet and the words that came from Jesus transformed his whole future and God is speaking to some of you right now in your seats right now in this place and he wants you to know that he can change you you know that you need him and I would challenge you to just let go Jesus is going to change you and if he does so he’s going to change you from the inside out you know it when I saw the story Jesus doesn’t calm and say hey come here here’s some clothes here’s some band-aids here’s seven steps on how to have a better life Jesus took care of what was inside of him and somehow the rest of the stuff on the outside took care of itself let me just encourage you Jesus wants to do a work in you and it’s going to show up on the outside but you can’t clean out the outside first and expect it to work don’t you dare get to a place where you say I’m gonna live for God but I got to clean myself up first I want to live for Jesus but let me take care of a few things first it doesn’t work you can’t clean yourself up and Jesus is here and he wants to rescue you from sin and from darkness and from yourself tonight not when you’re older not when you’re ready to settle down not when you’ve sold so your your Wild Oats okay now tonight he wants to move in your life I thank God that he did that for me they took me out of my darkness that he helped me like harry said he filled those voids in my life he helped me overcome my addictions he helped me let go of having to impress my friends he let me get out of you know going and getting wasted every single weekend he helped me realize that women aren’t objects okay so maybe you should stop rating them on facebook anyway um girl you’re so beautiful you’re number three on my top five come on man right and Jesus help me look at things differently change how I use my words took away the thoughts that I had in my life of driving out in front of a truck and just being done right took all of that away help me forgive people help me forgive people that brought drug abuse and violence and fear and all that junk into my childhood help me let go of all of that stuff let me tell you I was that guy that if you’re here tonight you’re him you’re not alone but Jesus is strong enough to change you you know those demons that evils presence was powerful look at the pigs right if what was inside of him killed two thousand pigs is powerful but Jesus is more powerful let me tell you something you can tweet this whatever you are no match for sin but sin is no match for Jesus I want you to get that you can’t fix it you can’t clean yourself up Jesus Christ can overcome sin in your life we’re going to give you an opportunity it’s just a second to come down here pray with the leader if you’re that guy don’t bail don’t bail on me don’t quit cuz i talked about something else for five minutes you know that you you come down here okay the rest of you thought you were off the hook you’re like I’m good I’m a church kid I want to ask you a second question it’s not about thinking second question are you one of those people will ask your ask your friend or you want to throw some people ask and

quit are you one of those people you say teacher rich people are you talking about want to tell you the other people the town the crowd listen to me listen to me after the massive bacon suicide okay after the pigs ran down the hill we see these people and they’re scared naturally right I’ve never seen demon-possessed pigs they’re scared of them apparently and they go get everyone to come see the gather everyone around and everyone’s around Jesus they see him in the flesh right and like the artist formerly known as Legion is there right the dude with the demon possession is there and they see him he’s been the town maniac the lunatic and they see him there with clothes on praise Jesus that your friend excuse wearing clothes and I they see him with clothes on in his right mind so what did they see they saw the Son of God and what he was capable of they knew exactly what Jesus could do whoa he’s powerful he cares about people way more than he cares about pigs apparently Jesus is something else but you know what they also saw the chaos they saw the pigs how they were chewers so they weren’t going to eat the pigs but maybe they were going to sell them okay and that’s a lot of money right stacks on stacks maybe I don’t know it’s a lot of cash it’s costly and it’s uncomfortable this guy’s been a weirdo now we got to accept him back into the community now we got to get along with this outcast they didn’t get it and let me tell you something the rest of the people those people consider their comfort and their money and some pigs more valuable than that guy and more valuable than having Jesus around because they said why don’t you go on to the next town they were cool with having Jesus around as long as it didn’t interfere with them they believed in and of course they did they saw him they were even impressed by him but if he’s going to do this if he’s going to cost us money if he’s going to mess everything up nah move along hear me tonight Jesus isn’t safe he is always dangerous Jesus is it cute okay he’s not desert he’s not el no he’s not any of that stuff he’s the god of the universe and if he’s involved in your life some stuff is going to change he’s going to mess some things up it’s probably going to cost you something so you start counting the cost you start deciding the following Jesus maybe isn’t worth giving up that one thing or that one person it’s not worth having to forgive somebody you say Jesus you can stay around but don’t mess with my relationships don’t mess with bad Jesus but you can make you can be around but don’t mess with my money i want to spend it how I want don’t mess with my you know iphone plus don’t step up my kds Jesus you go step on his LeBrons instead don’t mess with my stuff right don’t mess with my music don’t mess with my room Jesus don’t mess with my snapchat oh snap no pun intended don’t mess with the kind of pictures in the kind of text i’m trying to get from people don’t tell me jesus that sharing something on facebook is the same thing as saying it don’t mess with how i handle people that talk about me then I should have prayed for that dude instead of fighting him and feel a tough about it don’t mess with my life Jesus we decide we can’t afford it we ask him to move along to leave us alone and you know what he might how scary is that we decide is not worth that Jesus leave me alone go on and he might let me tell you tonight you’re walking down a scary Road those of you that think you’ve got enough going for you that you don’t need Jesus you need him more than anybody else in this stadium my heart breaks for you tonight and Emma explained so beautifully how we how we need him even when we don’t think we need him let me tell you if you’re one of those people forget that guy you’re in a darker place than that guy cuz he’s messed up but he knows he’s messed up and he falls the feet of Jesus and if you’re one of those people you know who Jesus is you’ve grown up in church you’ve gone to youth group you know he’s real you know what he’s capable of but you say no thanks leave me alone move along give me more time you’re in the darker place and I’m afraid there are lots of you and I’ve been you two up in youtube don’t mess with my relationship don’t mess with my girlfriend Jesus let me tell you one of

these days it’s going to be too late you might feel like you got a lot of time because you’re young but someday the door is going to close and the plane is going to leave whether you’re on it or not an eternity is going to be in the present going to be right now you’re going to spend the rest of time in heaven or in hell based on what you’ve done with Jesus wake up Fred he’s giving you another chance tonight Jake Ashley Matt pile Jessica Josh whoever you are whatever your name is Jesus is giving you a chance I’ve gone over my time already i’m closing but i want to invite you to do what that guy did and not what those people did come to Jesus this crazy demoniac is every single one of us if not for the grace of God maybe you’re here you feel like an expert sinner you feel so guilty you’re just miserable and chains and tradition and church have done nothing to help you and set you free but Jesus can tonight from the inside out it’s not about fighting urges it’s about becoming entirely new you’re going to come in just a moment if you’re here tonight you know in your heart you’re one of those people you know in your mind that Jesus is real but you’ve been putting them off pushing them away doing your own thing so you won’t mess up anything else stop it you’re committing spiritual suicide print your sealing your own fate you’re digging your own grave surrender right now all over this stadium not going to count to three i’m not going to make you bow your heads and close your eyes if you’re that guy or you’re one of those people and jesus gave you another chance tonight it’s just a second you’re gonna count the leaders going to come and play with you but I don’t want you to hesitate I don’t want you to look around and count and see how many of your friends come I want you to decide right now if you’re that guy oh you’re one of those people you’re either in the pool with Jesus or you’re that guy that knows he needs it or you’re one of those people has been putting it off and tonight you’re going to stop I want you to come are you ready praying you’re going to come Jesus move tonight for that guy for those people for everyone in between let us see our need for you in your name Amen would you come come right now come right now come leaders come leaders just come right now with the students come down here what play with you praise got people coming all over the place don’t worry about them you know choice Jesus is calling you tonight out of your darkness out of your pain out of your sin come right now out of your comfort out of your church games out of your emotions come on right now you want your whole life it’s gonna change you from the inside out you come and begin to pray even now don’t wait for the leaders start talking to Jesus right now God forgive me if I said forgive me for putting you off God Jesus

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Festival of Britain 1951: an introduction

hello my name is Anne Chau and I work with the art and photograph collections at the National Archives here in key so it’s my pleasure today to give you an introduction to the Festival of Britain through the records inherited and created by the festival office this webinar is not intended to replace the many fabulous publications you can find on the festival of britain you can see a selected selection or recommended fair reading at the end of this webinar few ish to find out more instead this webinar will give you a taster of the kind of records you might expect to find here and give you an introduction to this important post-war state-sponsored exhibition I’ll also give you some search tips if you wish to carry out some archival research here as early as 1943 the seeds were sown about the possibility of an exhibition to take place in 1951 the Lord President of the Council the right honourable Herbert Morrison announced proposals in 1947 to the house for national displayed illustrating the British contribution to civilization past present and future in the arts science and technology and in industrial design it was shortly after in consultation with the Prime Minister Clement Attlee that the festival would be a nationwide and would therefore be radically different from previous great exhibitions and fairs which have been held in a single site conceived to modern centenary was a great exhibition of 1851 as well as a tonic for the nation for four years the festival of Britain was a five month public celebration of Sciences art and all aspects of design which opened in May so this idea of it being initially castrated as a tonic for the nation as a persistently communicated concept memory and mood when one thinks of the festival as English dramatist Sam writer sir Arnold Wesker said of the Festival of Britain celebrations what do I remember what everybody remembers brave colors exhilarating shapes thrilling designs and the communication of courage no not quite why was the revelation that one has a spark of some people beyond oneself you know by seeing a good musical you came away feeling like you could dance just like Gene Kelly her moment and all the road in this sense West’s memories sums it up pretty well I think one of the intended outcomes was to travel one arm the nation was still feeling the effects was the war and rationing was still in place and would still be until 1954 so the first rule of Goodell was a national celebration there were even two thousand places where events were organized by local authorities as well as bullet rip bodies but several key projects and activities were made possible by Exchequer funds so this includes the South Bank exhibition site their exhibition of Science in South Kensington and the exhibition of industrial power out care wind hall in Glasgow an exhibition of architecture Town Planning and Building Research at Lansbury new poplar additionally there were two traveling exhibitions in an travelling exhibition which taught to Manchester Leeds Birmingham and Nottingham and the see travelling exhibition on the festival ship Campania and site was intended as the beating heart of the festival Britain celebrations which will be the primary focus of today’s webinar the first floor office recorded planning and organization but also that building on the site in photographic form as you can see here on this slide dismal fascinating selection equipment to the design group moment seems to be part of what is described at Murphy photographic survey of the South Bank taken by mr. Gryce these were regularly circulated to the design group committee to keep track of the building and completion of the South Bank site what laid before the construction was a South Bank site were warehouses a working-class housing and this is true of some of the other sites some reassuring evidence of war damage Britain delaio of the South Bank site was intended to showcase principles of urban design that would feature in post-war rebuilding of London and the

creation of new town on its completion the South Bank site was made up 22 freestanding pavilions with the themed around the land and the people of Britain the southern site incorporate multiple levels of buildings elevated walkways an aluminum plant fill the architecture and display of the south bank exhibition were planned by the festival office exhibition presentation panel look Joe Barry as director general and chairman and joined by others such as Hugh Castle Misha black has director architecture as well as James Gardiner and Alf tabs pictured here we can see Cheryl Barry and Misha black and others inspecting the little built of a lion dated 1949 decisions were made by committee and this reflected by the various minutes held here for instance in the design group minutes we see names of artists designers and companies being put forward the commissioning process by invitation we want asking sign as an artist to submit food costs of work if culture or preliminary sketches for assessment or suitability for instance in the early minutes dated October 1949 the new painters Henri cars work was seen and it was agreed his work should be in what kept in mind for a moderate sized mirror Elizabeth Bennet sculpture on the other hand was seen in a faint car and rejected by the group on the basis that it was not of sufficiently high standard for consideration and the Secretary was asked to attend photographs obviously it was a very rigorous selection process the minute suggests a disrespect commonplace and they they had very specific requirements different pavilion spaces in mind so just to give you a more of an idea of the kinds of things recorded in the minutes and the minutes painted in late 1949 the question what murals and sculptures in general were discussed and the following artists included them names such as John Piper and John Milton Minton ospreys see pavilion John Baker Robert medley James Fritton Ben Nicholson Edward Borden and Abram games which is noted possibly for industry the minutes are a fascinating read for those interested in the conditional process the selection of art is considered included the usual suspects were mentioned but also unusual ones were suggested but not taken forward such as the artist Francis Bacon some of these artists were eventually commissioned such as green startled and throat got here vocal on his mural the origins of the land origins of the land which was the fourth inland pavilion others such as the designer Abram gains went on to design the Festival of Britain emblem in Evelyn designers were invited to submit a design for the official festival of Britain as simple as past a limited bar as an apron competition the intention was that it was to feature in all official events and activity as well as approved non-official activity dis – such as Mona gray Tom Eckersley Millington ah was said to breathe here you can see a summation of their submissions archived here one of the missing during scenes around the festival I think is the festival Britain emblem by the British graphic designer games it really stands out as being memorable fitted with the brief as well as suited his personal motto maximum meaning means elsewhere myriad designers and artists took part in a number of ways individuals or companies were invited to submit artworks designs or offer other skills required for the exhibition it’s part of the commissioning process here you can see an expansive mineral by the British artist doodle trillion at the top and the industries by Carol Vogel and students of the cowboy school of sculptures set on the wall of the power and production pavilion on the bottom left-hand side on the bottom right-hand side you can see the sculpture London pride by Frank Dobson today you can see this sculpture located near the National Theatre at the South Bank it was also one of the first occasions when many women artists and designers had opportunities to take part the sculpture Barbara Hepworth received to port to public Commission’s turning forms which

was a motorized abstract piece made of reinforced concrete painted white and from 84 inches in height this was a direct contract from the Festival of Britain Authority continental forms in a school spoon sculpture made by be of Irish police limestone installed at the South Bank site is near the dam of discovery and was commissioned by the Arts Council in the minutes it was recorded that the festival committee were very particular around the scale subject and hospital location the sculptures but the artist also had opportunities for input particularly location austere sculptures were mentioned in the minutes writer illustrator and designer Barbara Jones who championed vernacular art made a substantial contribution to the festival demonstrating her skills and talent she organized the exhibition black eyes a lemonade at Whitechapel Gallery as well as contributing to science such as the poster she also Kahn treated as an exhibition designer in the line and unicrone pavilion here we can see a trash design that showcases her technical drawing skills in her contract bar we also hold numerous technical drawings as part of the exhibition design another way of looking at the records of the festival office in the series work 25 is fruits arrangement as a picture to perform transferred to the National Archives there are constant the Festival of Britain office were classified into seven distinct categories identified with the letters A to G therefore when you look at the catalogue you will see that the records are arranged in these categories so it’s still really useful to see its original arrangement also the records are relatively well described on the online catalogue from here you get a sense of the types of collections available so here we see that there are various categories of collections which are purely visual others are mainly written documentation or occasionally occasionally visual material I’ll now give you an overview of some of what is contained in some of these sub collections so think of this category papers as a general administrative records created by the festival office and which includes all kinds of documents you’d expect to locate on the organization planning and decision-making in all aspects of the has form you can locate the information from the numerous decision-making processes such as the minutes from the various committee illustrated here are examples of the minutes of the presentation panel who were responsible for overseeing building and displays on the south bank also here is the executive minutes which is where all the high-level decisions were recorded so you get a real sense of post-war sensibilities and government as a public commissioning body from these records so this category original artworks is a sample selection of regional artworks or designs for the display at a South Bank site or designers submitted book reproduction so it’s not a comprehensive collection and can contain preliminary designs submitted to design group for consideration on which were rejected more contextual information can be found in the sub series paper if you’re interested in finding out more but these designs here a variety of regional sketches and designs for all kind the science team is warper presented in modern-day science poster but you get different kinds of representations of the site one of which is to sketch by Erik Fraser for publicity I particularly like the line page header which I have included here unlike the original artworks collections these plans and drawings may be calm please or original drawings for desires across the south bank sign particularly displays in architectural designs for designated areas here are examples of designs submitted for example design for the giant birdcage containing plastic doll hanging from the roof of the line and unicorn pavilion you can also see a color sketch for polymer curry and lava sketch which incorporates natural elements into man-made design the photographic sub series is a fairy no official record of the Festival of Britain the range is enormous and can be unexpected as well as finding documentary Freight across poster

building at the South Bank site as mentioned earlier you can also locate photographic records or buried science wants to festival opened third class of commissioned original artworks and designs something for publicity purposes but also as a record in its own line you can also see Fred glass of buildings that were subsequently knocked down or a record of the surrounding areas of East London here you can see a banker’s shop at the corner of Canton Street as it was was a site for the exhibition of light architecture in poplar in contrast is also America by camp stone evidence for the series of new the farmer and his men for the country pavilion a small selection of these framed glass can give your dreams of the Ferengi of post-war design captured in the photographic records you’ll also find freight costs of different events and sights of the Festival of Britain so you’ll often find this category in miscellanea in all kinds of archival collections in this context it’s a mixture of samples of actual ancient Patrice was often included here our source of imputations tickets another printed matter to artefacts such as the Nestor a chocolate bar wrapper copyright documents is a substitute which is a mixture of commissioning letters and dot display contrast between the festival and artists and designers and companies were proposed including many commissioned works of art or designs the contract always includes exact specifications board to design you also increase fated correspondence between the festival artists and designers design companies and artists it very occasionally includes designs attached for example Barbra Jean’s the also an illustrator worked as an exhibition designer there’s also commissioned to do a spin side but as I mentioned earlier you can see the contrast specifying the schedule of work required the contrast specified Jane’s to design a figure 9 and Unicron in the persister has shown the commissioning writer covers designer scripts and booklet content Commission’s and the display mantras on the other hand covers designers for always including neurons so I’m now going to give an overview of how to kind of search our collections if you’re interested in that if you browse if you click on browse by hierarchy in the series description of work 25 in our catalog and as you can see on the PowerPoint you’ll get the sub series arrangement so as you can see the records in were 25 are organized in different sub categories including papers the original artworks and so forth as outlined earlier you can browse within these sub series if you want to a glance to get the overview of the records description and from there you can order up endpoints alternatively you can and do a keyword search so here you can see the series description or put 25 on the National Archives catalog you can search descriptions or files and by various keywords to see if we have anything you’re interested in you can also get more search guidance on how to Jesus search our catalog by clicking on discovery help on the top right hand side so just to summarize and the wrinkles were being worth 25 is searchable using different keyword search combinations you can search by the name of exhibiting areas such as people of Britain and some records are searchable by names such as the copyright contract documents other records are searchable by the time book records such as minutes posters and so on so hey what I said so far gives you an idea of the kinds of records we hold by the federal office so not every sink is held here as a general rule the National Archives holds the records of the exhibition areas of the festival office was involved in you might find that we have complementary records and in might

complement records held elsewhere so finally for those of you interested in finding out more here is a selected list or further reading you can view some of the publication’s in our reference library here I’ve also written some blogs related to the records of the festival Britain and you can find these blocks on the National Archive blocks Erie please make a small selection of all records are available to be viewed and purchase also on the National Archives image library and thanks for listening

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University Challenge – Christmas 2019, Episode 1 – Leeds University v Clare College, Cambridge

Christmas University cabbage asking the questions Jeremy Paxman hello some not overly subtle embellishments to our surroundings tell us that tonight we’re beginning our annual competition for distinguished alumni of some of the UK’s leading universities and university colleges 14 teams have bravely accepted our invitation to entertainers over the next few nights and in order to be on a team everyone needs to have graduated from the institution they’re playing for and since leaving to have gone on to make their mark in their chosen field happily this second criterion is so vague as to be almost meaningless be up against the kind of questions we like to throw out the country’s brainiest students and the rules of the competition at the same for them except that out of seven winning teams from these first round matches it’ll be only the four teams with the highest scores who proceed to the next stage of the competition now first the university of leeds represented by an expert on China and Japan who’s contributed to Channel 4’s new secrets of the Terracotta Warriors and China’s Jade Empire while his writings include a scholarly work on anime and a brief history of the samurai essential reading according to the Japan Times attentive viewers will remember their next player from his appearances as a student in this competition thirty-six years ago clearly the years have been kind and he’s filled them in part by writing both fiction and factual books including the accidental species misunderstandings of human evolution and the ever handy her field guide to dinosaurs from recording artists to Reverend their captain’s career has been diverse to say the least he found fame with the band the Communards in the 1980s and since then as well as his day job has been a frequent presenter and broadcaster on theological and other matters he’s also redefined what we’re entitled to expect of our present-day clergy by making it to week three of Strictly Come Dancing their fourth player is a photographer who specializes in recording the lives of remote communities throughout the world he’s worked for the independent and the Sunday Telegraph was photographer on TV series human planet and as one press photographer of the year six picture editors guild awards and 19 commendations for travel photographer of the year let’s meet the Leeds team I’m Jonathan Clements I graduated in 1994 in Japanese with East Asian Studies and I am now an author of books on Far Eastern history and a TV presenter for National Geographic I’m Henry G I graduated in 1984 with zoology and genetics I’m a recovering paleontologist and I’m an editor with the science journal nature this is their captain I’m Richard Coles I did research degree at Leeds when I was at the Theological College about 15 years ago and now vicar refined and had the unique distinction of being the only clergyman to have spray-tanned with Debbie McGee following that I’m Timothy Allen I was at Leeds at the end of the 1980s I actually flunked my degree and got a tutu in zoology fortunately after I left I picked up a camera and 25 years later I’m still doing exactly the same thing now the team from Clare College Cambridge includes a soprano particularly noted for her performances of Baroque music she’s performed at major venues across Europe including the Royal Albert Hall the Zurich ton Halle and the Wigmore Hall in 2008 she gave the world premiere of Sir John tavernas Requiem in Liverpool Cathedral and in May 2018 she sang at the wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markel with her is an award-winning novelist he’s also written several screenplays and presented numerous documentaries including Channel 4’s unreported world and we can perhaps expect to see the galvanizing effect it has on a player’s performance to know that his younger brother captain the winning team in this contest in 2015 now we might choose to imagine their captain tonight to be the kind of person whose visits to a classroom and met with some trepidation she’s been a school governor that share of off koala qualifications at the exams regulator worked for the education charity arc and has served on the board of the Institute of Education their final team member has worked for

the independent and the observer and is now columnist for her current newspaper her first novel I don’t know how she does it was a best-seller and was made into a film starring Sarah Jessica Parker her latest how hard can it be is to become a u.s. Drama Series let’s meet the Clare College team I’m Aileen Monaghan Thomas I studied anglo-saxon Norse and Celtic in the 90s but for the last 20 years I’ve been a classical soprano a Marcell through I graduated in English literature in 1989 and I’m a writer and broadcaster and this is their captain I’m Amanda Spielman I studied maths and law at Claire graduating in 1982 and I am the Ofsted Chief Inspector I’m Allison Pearson I read an awful lot of novels at Clare College Cambridge in the late 1970s I’ve since since tried to write a few myself I’m now the chief columnist and interview of the Daily Telegraph okay I guess you all know the rules are the same as for the students 10 points for starter questions their individual efforts bonuses the team efforts they’re worth 15 interrupts to start a question incorrectly you’ll be fine five points right fingers on the buzzers your first starter for 10 what six letter noun appears in all these titles firstly a novel by Daniel would rule set in the Ozark Mountains secondly a play by Shakespeare featuring two bohemian shepherdess is called mopsa and Dorcas and the first episode of the first series of Game of Thrones leads Clemens winter correct right your bonuses are on sites added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2019 in each case name the site firstly the seat of rulers such as Hammurabi and Nebuchadnezzar which City on the Euphrates fell to the Persians in 539 BCE it’s ruins are located about 19 kilometres south of Baghdad Babylon correct secondly the capital of the Indian state of Rajasthan which fortified City combines ideas from Hindu Mughal and Western urban planning and is known for its rose colored buildings Jaipur Jaipur is correct established in 1945 which site in northwest England has played a significant role in the study of meteors the discovery of quasars and the tracking of spacecraft total Bank correct a thin layer of the unstable compound silver fulminate and a layer of abrasive material are placed in contact during the usual manufacture of which common seasonal items some plant Spielman fireworks no I have to take the first thing you say so you can hear the rest of the question Leeds placed in contact during the usual manufacture of which common seasonal items sometimes banned on aircraft shearing force is usually applied by pulling cardboard strips under HG Christmas crackers Christmas crackers is correct yes we get a set of bonuses on a sporting event leads in August 20 1948 more than 200 men to win the Transcontinental a race across Europe by what means of transport she completed the 4,000 kilometres in just over ten days skateboard no it’s cycling the start of this east-west race was the city of door gasps that’s bu our GA s along with Varna it is one of the two main seaports in which country Bulgaria correct the Transcontinental finished at which French naval base about 60 kilometres southwest of Rostov in Brittany oh no it’s breasts ten points for this 2019 saw the death of which Italian film director Claire Monahan Thomas Franco Zeffirelli correct right your bonuses are on exhibitions at the Tate galleries in 2019 in each case name the artist from the description firstly for five which British photojournalist was the subject of a retrospective at Tate Britain that featured images of conflict in Vietnam Northern Ireland and Syria as well as urban and rural scenes of life in Britain Don McCallum correct focusing on his work from 1912 until his death in 1947 which French artists work appeared in the Tate Modern exhibition the color of memory his paintings include nude in

the bath and stairs in the artist garden I’m sorry not my tea it’s not my tea snow assert not syrup syrup no it’s not it’s pure burner and finally Tate Liverpool held the first UK retrospective a widget u.s. artists and activists work part of the 1980s New York art scene he was known for his colorful images and motifs including a barking dog and a radiant baby we don’t know Jeff Koons it’s Keith Haring right we’re going to take a picture round now for your picture starter you’ll see an excerpt from a poem of 1819 two rhyming words have been obscured for ten points give me both of them leads gee burden heard correct yes let’s see the whole thing part of Keats’s ode to a nightingale so we follow on from ode to a nightingale with bonuses on lines from three more of the six major roads written by Keats in 1819 this time you need to give me the single word that’s been obscured which in each case is the titular subject of the ode firstly you’re looking for an abstract noun here majesty no it’s melancholy we’ll see the whole thing now secondly another abstract now Sugar Puffs indolence and finally a mythological figure and Cupid now that’s psyche there’s no thing there we are right 10 points for this starter question fingers on the buzzers which traditional English Carol is this the New Oxford book of carols states that its refrain is incoherent and oddly irrelevant standing in the same aesthetic relationship to the verse as does tower bridge to the Tower of London it’s Thomas ding dong merrily on high no you lose 5 points its title refers to two evergreen plants ah Leeds Cole’s the holy Ivy correct your bonuses are on plants and animals with names that come from the Malay language in each case give the name from the description firstly a starch prepared from the pith of palm trees in a seasonal context the word may be the answer to the Christmas cracker joke how do you start a pudding race sago indeed what name is given to several generative parrots with large curved beaks and feathered Chris species include the gala and the Gang Gang cockatoo cockatoo is correct finally a large anthropoid ape it’s name means man of the forest around your turn correct 10 points for years September 2019 saw the announcement of the discovery of a previously unknown 17th century manuscript by which philosopher of the English enlightenment concerning the toleration of Roman Catholics it predates his two treatises on government by about 20 years ah lead skulls look Locke is correct right your bonuses this time are on parts of a house or building in each case give the term from the description firstly meaning a small elegantly furnished room for a lady to rest or receive friends what word comes from a French verb meaning to pout boudoir boudoir is correct what part of a house has a name that arrives via the name of an order of architecture from the name of the area around anthems attic attic is correct what word for an entrance hall in a

theater for example deer eyes via French from the Latin for half way for is correct ten points for this the last line of cars cause Lee’s poem innocent song refers to which historical figure described in the second chapter of Matthew’s Gospel as having died shortly after the birth of Jesus through John the Baptist the after the Oh in Matthew’s Gospel come on it’s Herod right ten points for this I need two names promptly here born in 18-49 and 1887 respectively what are the surnames of the scientists Ivan and Erwin who appear in a joke to which the punchline is the librarian said the book rang a bell but they weren’t sure if it was there or not Leeds Clements Pavlov and Schrodinger correct yes laughs we look about a dog and a cat right these are your bonuses they’re on the works of Tony Morrison who died in 2019 in each case name the novel firstly which early work blends elements of realism fable and fantasy and follows Mack on dead the third nicknamed the milkman in his search for an identity beloved no it’s Song of Solomon secondly sit on a Caribbean island which novel depicts the unlikely romance between Jay Dean a wealthy fashion model and son a poor fugitive it explores conflicts of race class and sex beloved no that’s tar baby and finally which novel tells the story of a former slave who at the point of recapture kills her daughter to spare her a life of slavery beloved beloved is correct right we’re going to take a music round now if your music starter you’ll hear a piece of classical music for 10 points please name its composer lead skulls that is Wilson know anyone like to buzz from clay you can hear it’ll more Claire Monahan Thomas ogre it is Elgar yes that was part of his pomp and circumstance March which was given this world premiere at the Proms by conductor and proms founder Sir Henry wood to mark a hundred and fifty years since Woods birth your bonuses are three more works whose UK premieres were given by wood at the Proms name the composer in each case firstly this piano concerto Ravel Ravel is correct yes piano concerto in D major for the left hand secondly this violin concerto Brook no it’s Sibelius his violin concerto in D minor and finally this orchestral work go to nominate Manahan thomas is that their fire notes Debussy right ten points for this in professional baseball North America has the world series in which countries are the most successful teams from the Central League and the Pacific League play one another in a championship series leads Clemens Japan Japan is correct yes right you get a set of bonuses leads on a polar phenomenon around the turn of the 20th century the Norwegian scientist Kristian Birkeland

was the first to explain the source of which polar phenomenon once thought to be a portent of doom aurora borealis correct outer is known as the city of the Northern Lights because of its location in which area of Norway the country’s northernmost County Finnmark Finnmark is correct who in the 1770s first used the name aurora australis for the true southern lights following his voyage towards the Antarctic in the ship resolution cook cook is correct ten points for this from the Greek was setting in motion what term denotes signaling molecules produced by one group of cells that exert an effect on a group of distant sir leads g-woman hormone is correct yes right your bonuses this time are on recipients of the European Green Capital Award a recognition of the role that local authorities play in improving the environment in each case identify the city from the description firstly the winner in 2017 a former center of coal mining in the rural area located between Dortmund and Dusseldorf SC Essen is right secondly the 2013 winner a city on the river Loire close to the Atlantic coast it gives its name to an edict of 1598 that granted religious freedoms to Protestants north correct and finally an inland city about 40 kilometres south of Bilbao it’s the capital of the Spanish Basque Country shown Sebastian no it’s Victoria there’s still plenty of time to get going Claire so maybe you’ll do it with this picture around for your picture starter you’re gonna see us still from a musical film for 10 points I want the film’s title ah Leeds Cole’s on the turn on the town is correct that film was the directorial debut of the choreographer Stanley Donen who died early in 2019 for your picture bonuses stills from three more of Dylan’s films five points for each film you can name firstly to catch a thief note Sherrod secondly Star Wars let’s Peter Cook and Dudley Moore in bedazzled and finally Seven Brides for Seven Brothers indeed yes like ten points for this described as an in-depth tidying masterclass spark joy is a follower Claire Pearson Mary condo correct right you get a set of bonuses on jealous which Spanish cellist formed a renowned chamber music trio in 1905 with the penis alfred corto and the violinist Jett Tebow Publica sells correct Shostakovich his first cello concerto in britain’s cello symphony were both written for which cellist born in baku in 1927 nominate mr. Stavros trip ovitch correct yes finally a student of both castles and rostropovich who features the cellist in Christopher new ppens 1969 documentary film the trout in which he appeared alongside Daniel Barenboim chuckling Despres correct make a point for this during the thawing process soil microbes in permafrost turn carbon into carbon dioxide and which other gas this is us Leeds Clements methane methane is correct yes your bonuses this time around physics leads you cannot win and you cannot breakeven are commonly cited summaries of two of the four main laws of which branch of physics thermodynamics correct the unattainable ‘ti statement of the third law asserts that using a finite number of thermodynamic cycles what

condition for a system is impossible entropy no it’s reaching a temperature of absolute zero and finally what’s quantity relating to thermodynamics is often given the symbol s free energy that is entropy ten points for this who played the title role in sanh goals production of King Lear that opened on Broadway in April 2019 at the Old Vic in 2016 she played the same characters shortly after returning to acting Pearson Glenda Jackson correct your bonuses are on the 2019 British Book Awards also known as the nippy’s in each case give the title from the description first the memoir that won audiobook of the Year written and narrated by Michelle Obama it’s a bonus question so you can give it through your captain but you gave the wrong one it’s becoming and secondly the novel that won the award for crime fiction and thriller of the year it was the 12th nolde by the South London author Louise candless that’s our house and finally the novel by Sally Rooney that won the award for overall book of the year I need the two-word title please normal people correct ten points for this now meaning varied in character appearance or color what word does Jake was used to refer to touchstone in as you like it in its sense of a traditional color Oh piebald no you lose five points Claire in its traditional sense of a colored gestures cost you leads Clements motley motley is correct your bonuses are on rarely used words that appear in Christmas carols identify each word from the description firstly taken from the second verse of hark the herald angels sing a word meaning the character or quality of being a deity come on Godhead Godhead is correct from the second verse of the Coventry Carol a generic noun that refers to a juvenile person or animal childer though it’s youngling and finally appearing in the first verse of ding dong merrily on high [Applause] congratulations Lee’s 205 is a great score maybe you’ll come back as one of the four highest-scoring winning teams we’ll find out thank you I hope you can join us next time when we’ll have another first round match but until then it’s goodbye from Clare College Cambridge it’s goodbye from Lee’s University and it’s goodbye from me goodbye [Applause] [Applause] [Applause] [Applause] you [Applause]

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