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Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Good afternoon and thank you for joining us for a virtual town hall meeting to discuss our plans for welcoming you to campus for valance direction at Michigan Technological University Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: We’re excited to have you with us as we share the plans. We’re making to provide campus based instruction in a safe and effective manner for everyone on campus Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: My name is Larkin, have your marquee and the President of undergraduate student government and today I’ll be serving as moderator for the meeting Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: The formal part of the presentation will last about 55 minutes leaving about 30 minutes for question and answer Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Several questions were submitted in advance. If you have questions during the session, please use the Q AMP a feature available to you on the zoom interface Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: I’ll do my best to feel these questions to the appropriate individuals on our panel. We may not be able to answer all of the questions post today Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This event is being recorded. If you lose connection or would like to watch it again or share with others. The session will be posted the empty you flex page on Monday Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: One of the topics that will be discussed in the presentation today is personal protective equipment Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: As you can see, none of us are currently wearing face coverings. And this is because we are an individual offices with doors closed Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: We believe we will be reviewing. Most of these requirements and some of the nuances, such as this during today’s town hall Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: I’d now like to introduce our panelists joining us from campus Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Jackie hunting provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Bonnie Gorman Dean of Students and Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Vice President for Student Affairs Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Joe Cooper, director of financial aid Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Teresa Coleman Kaiser Associate Vice President for administration Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Sarah sheltie general counsel and Secretary to the Board of Trustees. She has also been leading our empty you flex return to campus team Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: And now like to turn it over to President come back to get us started Richard Koubek: Thanks Larkin, and thanks for joining us today. During our town hall Richard Koubek: As you can imagine, there’s been lots of planning going on here on campus in preparation for your return and you’re going to hear a lot of details. Over the next 55 minutes Richard Koubek: But I just wanted to take a moment and talk to you briefly about the three fundamentals that we used in developing these plans Richard Koubek: The first is accommodations, we realize that there are those identified by the CDC that may be in particularly high risk categories for the effects of coven 19 Richard Koubek: And you healer about accommodations that we’re putting in place, whether you are subject to those or someone you live with such that you can study remotely, or if you’re an employee. You can work remotely Richard Koubek: The second is adjustments to nearly every process that we have on campus Richard Koubek: You’re going to hear about the social distancing. You’re going to hear about the dining changes, you’re going to hear about classrooms being smaller, you’re going to hear about some of your classes being hybrid Richard Koubek: Lots of activity there. But those are all adjustments that we put in place there I minimize the risk of covert impacting our campus in a negative way Richard Koubek: And the third is agility. You’ll also hear about the empty you flex plan in our ability to move up or down with regard to the remediation that we need to put in place Richard Koubek: And if we get to a point that we can’t continue on campus that we’re ready to make that change as well. So we’re proud of the amplitude flex plan and all the planning that has been done Richard Koubek: All of this is done with two primary goals. The first and foremost is your safety when you return to campus that’s been central to the entire conversation that we’ve had over the summer Richard Koubek: But the second is to do our best to protect the Michigan Tech husky on campus experience that we want you to have while you’re here. And with that I’ll turn it over to the panelists and the first panelist is our Provost, Dr. Jackie hunter soon Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Great, thanks. President come back Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Okay, I want to start talking a little bit about some of the constraints. We’ve had controlling our planning for fall semester Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So as president codec mentioned at the very start. Safety is our first consideration Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And so we’re going to be asking anybody who comes to campus be at faculty staff or students to be smart and do their part to help protect the health and safety of everybody else in our campus and local community Jackie Huntoon, Provost: The first thing that we’re going to be doing is asking everyone to maintain to the maximum extent possible six foot physical distancing between individuals Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Will also be asking everyone to fair to wear face coverings. Typically, these will be masks whenever they’re indoors in any area that is not within a closed office with the door closed a single person being there

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So whenever you’re in a building here at Michigan Tech and fall semester you will be asked to wear a face covering unless you’re in your own personal isolated space. So we want everybody to know that that’s a requirement coming out Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And faculty will be prepared to enforce that in the classroom, if necessary. We’re also going to be asking everybody to engage in frequent handwashing Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We know that’s one of the best ways to control the spread of any disease. So it’s something we should all do frequently anyway Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We’ll be working with our facility staff as well as all members of the campus community to make sure that we clean any shared surfaces frequently Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And we all need to take personal responsibility for making sure we clean things before and after we use them again to help reduce the transmission of any diseases Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Will be asking people to monitor their symptoms. This is very easily done. Many of us have been doing it for most of the summer for whenever we go to campus Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And it’s a way to remind yourself to keep track of your health and keep track of how you’re feeling Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And to think twice about going out in public. If you think you might either have the disease or have been exposed to the disease Jackie Huntoon, Provost: To that end, as well as we have a very comprehensive testing and contact tracing plan in place Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So that if someone does think they’re ill, they can get tested right here in our local area we’re working with local medical providers Jackie Huntoon, Provost: As well as laboratory facilities here on campus to make sure the testing is done as quickly as possible and should have positive test arise were prepared to do the contact racing that’s necessary to find out who else may have been exposed Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Should someone think they were exposed or actually have been exposed, we will have facilities available on campus for those students who live on campus for quiet quarantine and isolation Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And we’ll make sure that those students are well cared for by there are isolated from the rest of campus Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And finally, actually, as President codec already mentioned, we will be able to make accommodations for students who are particularly high risk, we’ve already done this for a number of our faculty and are doing it for a number of our staff Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So what are the implications of all of those safety measures. Well, the first implication is that some courses are moving to either a remote or online mode to improve their quality Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Some of the people who taught remotely during spring semester when we rapidly had to transition to remote learning from face to face learning Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Found that their courses actually were more effective students were more engaged and they felt that the material was addressed in with higher quality. After they moved to remote instruction Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And that’s because it gave students the opportunity to interact with the material in new in different ways that maybe they haven’t tried before Jackie Huntoon, Provost: As well as to be sure and give some of the students who might be shy about speaking up in class, the opportunity to contribute to classroom discussions via zoom Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Some of our classrooms are going to have reduced occupancy limits because of the physical distancing requirement. So, for example, our largest classroom on campus as Fisher 135 and pre coven Jackie Huntoon, Provost: It had a capacity of about 475 students now with all of the requirements that we put in place it will have a capacity of 75 students so Jackie Huntoon, Provost: That classroom clearly can’t accommodate as large a class as it was in the future. Some of the classes that were in a room like that have been moved to remote instruction or online instruction and I’ll talk Jackie Huntoon, Provost: A little bit about the difference between those two and a minute Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Others will continue to have some face to face component. However, in some cases, not every student will be able to attend every single face to face class Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So, some will be there right in the classroom with their faculty member. Well, others will be participating from a different location Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We talked about and you may have heard about having increased time between classes to allow for people to move from point A to point B Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Without crowding or without having people trying to get into and out of a classroom at the same time Jackie Huntoon, Provost: For the moment we’ve decided to leave the time between classes as it has been which means 10 minutes, but we are open to changing that, in the future, should the need arise Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So some classroom activities are going to move online also so that we can maximize maximize the use of high demand spaces such as labs for the activities that really make the best use of those faces. Next slide

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So I really want to call out all of our faculty and staff who have worked amazingly hard since Jackie Huntoon, Provost: First disrupted our campus activities Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We all knew that the challenge was really to take everything that we do here on campus. Normally in a face to face way at specific times in the day Jackie Huntoon, Provost: To a new mode and in some cases that new mode is something we’re referring to as remote learning Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And remote learning is basically synchronous learning, meaning that it happens at agreed upon times. So even though people might not all be physically in the same location. They are meeting together at the same time, much as we’re doing right now Jackie Huntoon, Provost: In addition to that, some courses went fully online because that’s what the students wanted an online courses are those that are offered asynchronously, meaning that people can interact with the material or the course at any time that they want Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So the, the biggest challenge facing the faculty over the summer was figuring out how to take everything we do on our campus Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And make it possible to do those things in either remote or asynchronous and for everything that we will be doing face to face on our campus. We’re also going to have Jackie Huntoon, Provost: The ability to do those at least remotely and possibly asynchronously and online Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So the reason we’re putting so much emphasis on this is, you know, as we all know, there’s a lot of uncertainty about what’s going to happen in the fall Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We’re all watching what’s happening around the United States right now. And you know, I think we have to agree that it’s possible Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Not desirable but possible that one of our students will either be exposed to this disease or fall ill from this disease at some point during fall semester Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So we’re really trying to do everything to make sure that no one’s educational process is disrupted. As a result of that Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And so if you can’t attend in person, because you think you’ve been exposed or you’ve tested positive Jackie Huntoon, Provost: That’s okay, you’re going to be able to continue on with your education, you won’t have to drop your courses, you can just continue on whether you’re engaged in things like enterprise or senior design Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Other research projects, whether or not you want to visit your advisor and get some advising Jackie Huntoon, Provost: From your dorm room. Let’s say you’re you’re off campus apartment or visit with your faculty member through Office Hours. So, you know, congratulations to our faculty for thinking this through and making this happen. It’s really been an amazing feat. Next slide Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So when we first started talking about tech flex. There was a lot of questions like, Can this even be done. Can we say we’re going to offer face to face Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Education, and at the same time offer an equivalent experience to students who need to attend remotely because of health concerns and Jackie Huntoon, Provost: What was really great to find was that when we were forced to do this without any notice whatsoever in spring semester 2020 55% of the instructors who are teaching during spring semester Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Were cited by at least one of their students for doing an excellent job of moving their face to face course into a remote learning experience Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And that means that 373 unique individuals were cited by at least one students. That’s actually a phenomenal achievement Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We learned some things we issued a survey to students at the end of spring to say hey what worked really well. We also asked what asked what didn’t work so well. So we can try to work on those shortcomings Jackie Huntoon, Provost: But what we learned was students really appreciated having access to recorded lectures so they could engage with the material asynchronously. They liked having the opportunity to engage with faculty during Jackie Huntoon, Provost: virtual office hours, usually using zoom and they really appreciated the fact that faculty tried to provide individualized support AND feedback, despite the distances between students and faculty next Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So as I said, we did pretty well we actually, we did really well in spring semester. But we’re really working hard to do better for the fall Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And so, prior to the coven disruption in spring semester only 25% of our faculty had received the professional development or training Jackie Huntoon, Provost: That we normally require for someone to teach online or remotely by the start of fall 2020 semester that percentage goes up to 84% Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And the University Senate has been a great partner to the university administration on this sort of reaffirming the importance of this professional development so that we can do as good a job as possible with instruction

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We’ve also asked students to do some preparations, we learned during the spring that the students who were most successful successful Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Had access dedicated access to some sort of computing device such as a laptop that included a camera and a headset so that they were Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Able to interact with their classmates and their faculty at any time they wish to do so. So we are asking students to return to campus Jackie Huntoon, Provost: With a computing design device. Typically, this will be some sort of laptop, including a camera and a headset and the specifications for those are now available on Michigan texts website next Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So with this slide. I’d like to introduce our Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Dr. Bonnie Gorman Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Thanks. Jackie, I am just delighted that all of you were able to join us today, and I really can’t wait to welcome you back to campus Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Our intense in the town hall today is really to Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Give you an overview. We’re going to give you a lot of information, but in the next few weeks. We’re going to be sending you information fairly consistently. So, encourage you to routinely check your email so that you can have up to date information on a regular basis Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And finally, as a reminder, we have changed our calendar and classes are going to begin on Thursday, August 27 Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And when you come to campus. Things are going to look and feel a little bit different. And as the people who have already spoken said safety is our highest priority, and we’re going to expect you to do your part Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: That will begin with daily symptom monitoring, we will be launching a website on July 27 and be asking students to monitor their symptoms on a regular basis Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: We’d like you to begin doing this actually 14 days before you intend to arrive on campus. And of course, if you have any symptoms. We ask that you delay your return to campus Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: As Jackie indicated, everybody will be asked to wear face coverings and all indoor spaces and in outdoor spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained, you won’t have to wear your face covering in your residence hall room or in your office if the door is closed Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: We are adhering to the physical distancing guidelines, both in and out of class and many businesses in town are asking people to adhere to these guidelines as well. And we ask that you follow their requests this community is counting on all of us to help stop the spread Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: There is a testing program in place and Sarah’s going to say more about that. I would simply asked that if you are asked to take a test that you would be willing to participate. This would be at no cost to you Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: We need to hold each other accountable. These are new things that we need to do every day and they take some getting as getting used to Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: I found myself on campus, not having done my symptom tracker and I wasn’t able to get into the building Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: My colleague forgot her mask one day and had to return home. So I encourage you to find someone a buddy to help you to remind each other to do these things on a regular basis, so that they can become a habit Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And we are huskies. After all, and a group of students have put together a pledge that we’re inviting all students to sign Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: You’ll be sent the link for this and more information will be coming but we hope that you’d be willing to demonstrate your commitment to keep yourself healthy and to keep our community healthy. Next slide Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: For those of you who are living in the residence halls in accordance with our public health guidelines, we will have two people in a room Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And you have been moving the moving process will be a little bit different. As returning students, you’ve been at sent an email and asked to sign up for a move in time that is convenient for you Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: The goal here of course is to avoid lots of people showing up on the same day at the same time needing to use the same door so we ask that you do that sign up Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And then adhere to the times that you have fall that you have requested Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: In addition, we’re trying something new. For those of you, for whom it might be convenient Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: If you’d like to drop off your property and advanced in order to avoid any kind of congestion, you can do that. Between July 31 and August 9 and there’ll be an email coming from housing about that sign up Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Dining Services will also be adhering to physical distance in the dining halls and we will also be having grabbing go available as well to Reese is going to talk a little bit more about that in a few minutes

Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: In the common areas in the residence halls, you will be asked to wear masks and to practice the physical distance and guidelines Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: When the students, staff, come back, they will be trained with up to date information about Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And will provide support should you become ill and is Jackie indicated, we do have isolation space identified for students who live in the residence halls dining services will be providing your meals and will be to have Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Staff from the residence Education Office be checking on you on a daily basis. We do recommend that students pack in isolation kit Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: These are some other things that you might want to consider putting inside. We will be actually giving you to face coverings. When you get to campus. But since we’re going to be wearing them a lot. You may want to bring a couple of your own Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Might need a thermometer to check your temperature for symptoms disinfecting wipes. I think this is something that we’re all going to be carrying in addition to our water bottles and our phones Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Any medications that you take on a regular basis, clean clothes and some food staples. You know those things, you keep in your room. Anyway, like Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Juice tea chickens chicken soup peanut butter and crackers. And again, as I said in the red for students who are from the residence halls, your meals will be delivered to you. I would actually recommend you throw a good book in there as well. Next slide Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: So what does all what do all these changes mean for student Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: groups on campus student leadership and involvement HAS BEEN WORKING TO PUT TO GET TOGETHER guidelines for our student organizations. These guidelines will include information about how to Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Host your events safely meeting requirements that adhere to physical distancing recommendations for congregate living houses recruitment and resources for successful virtual events Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Student organizations will be required to adhere to the meeting size limitations which is 50 people in a room with physical distancing Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Travel is going to be discouraged. Obviously we if we’re, we have a safe environment here and the virus is not present. We don’t want to risk people going elsewhere and being exposed and bringing it back Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: We’ve been talking a lot about club sports and under murals and the guidelines that are appropriate there. Obviously, we need to limit our high touch sports limit competition Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Keep travel to a minimum. Many of the organizations like the rugby club, for example, have national associations and they have also put out guidelines. So we’re looking at those as we make our recommendations going forward Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And finally, I recommend that you think about your circle of contacts and keep them relatively small as much as possible. These could include your housemates they could include people in the rooms around you. People from Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Your, your teams or a work group or a Bible study, to the extent possible, avoid crowds parties and bars Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Next slide Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: So some of the events that you’re normally see on campus will continue. Welcome Week will still happen. We’ll still distribute the binders that we distribute every year will provide some snacks for you be handing those out, you know, kind of at a distance and you can pick it up Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: OKAY, DAY WILL BE virtual this year, but we will be hosting in person interest fares. So for example, we may have all the club sports out on one day in the afternoon and students will be able to interact in a smaller group with sports and activities that they might be interested in Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Pretty excited actually about moving the career fair online. I know Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: At first it seems a little unusual, but we do have a platform that we’re able to use and instead of one long afternoon with long lines Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: This format will actually afford students the opportunity to sign up or time with employers that they’re interested in. And we’ll be doing this over a two day period Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Career Services is ready to provide the same kind of preparation for the virtual career fair Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: That they would provide for the in person career fair and those resources and presentations will be available both in person in smaller groups and online Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Our parade of nations will be interactive. We will be missing the food. I have to say, but students will have the opportunity to travel around the world without leaving home Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And last but not least, athletics. We’ve had a lot of questions about that and we’re still actually waiting for more guidance from the NC double A

Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Right now we’re following the governor’s recommendation which indicates that there can be 500 spectators at an outdoor event and 250 out an indoor event Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: So this is what we’re working with. Currently, but by the time various SEASON START for different sports. This of course could change. Next slide Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Of course, there are numerous resources available on campus counseling services is available to you. And if you’re not sure where to go. You can always come to the Dean of Students Office or reach out to us via email Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: I wanted to list the health care providers that are available in the area we’re working closely with the upper Great Lakes Family Health Center Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: For our testing program. And if that would be a provider that you are comfortable using we would encourage you ahead of time to go online and complete their patient portal. Should you need their services that will speed up Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: The opportunity, the opportunity to get seen and to get the information back and I want to mention to hear that you should check your personal insurance plans Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Sometimes you just want to have someone to consult with and more and more insurance companies are making Telehealth available Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And making nurses available for those conversations. So you might want to check and see what’s available to you that way. Again, thank you for joining us. I look forward to seeing you in the fall, and I’m going to turn it over now to Teresa Coleman Kaiser Associate Vice President for administration Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Thank you, Bonnie and good afternoon, everyone. I’m so glad that you’ve joined us this afternoon to hear about our planning for the fall semester Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: I want to share some information about how we’ve planned to have our custodial staff significantly redirect their effort to focus on regularly sanitizing high frequency touch points, such as water fountains door knobs light switches and elevator buttons throughout all campus buildings Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: The staff will be using disinfectants approved by the EPA to kill the corona virus as they regularly clean classrooms and restrooms and hit those high frequency touch points Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: I’d like you to know that this cleaning may occur overnight so you may not personally observed the custodian doing this, cleaning, but it will be done regularly Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: sanitizing frequently will be significantly increased, however, I’d like to remind you that you should always treat any surface as having the potential for harboring the virus and take steps to protect yourself Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: campus buildings are being prepared now with directional signage to indicate traffic flow and to remind you to physically distance Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Hand sanitizer will be provided throughout buildings and frequent Hand washing is encouraged to protect yourself and others Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: In the classroom, you will see instructional personnel doing their part by white being shared equipment and demonstrating personal protection by bringing their own markers and erasers to eliminate sharing Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Specifically for those of you living in the residence halls bathrooms and wads DHHS and McNair will be cleaned twice a day, seven days per week, which is that a higher frequency than our previous practice and, as recommended by the CDC and the American College Health Association Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Other residence hall spaces such as kitchen ads and meeting rooms will be claimed by staff but also stocked with a supply of cleaning products and standard instructions to assist everyone in maintaining a healthy environment Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: If you live in a location where you’re responsible for your own cleaning, such as the Daniel heights apartments or an off campus apartment Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: We suggest frequent wiping up all high frequency touch points and regular bathroom and kitchen cleaning creating an agreed upon schedule with your roommates and making the schedule visual is highly recommended Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: I’ve received quite a few inquiries about ventilation and campus spaces Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: I want you to know that Michigan Tech will be following best practices and using engineering controls to increase the volume of outside air moved through buildings and will be maximizing the effectiveness of air filtration systems Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: I’m going to move to the next slide. And I’m also glad to share some information with you about what dining services will look like across campus as well as in the residence halls Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: All Dining Services at Michigan Tech will operate under any executive order that is currently in place and leans heavily on the local health department, the CDC and the National Restaurant Association for operational guidance Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: We plan to allow as much in house seating for dining as possible but expect that to be at a reduced capacity Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: cleaning and disinfecting and all dining operations will continue to be the highest priority and as required. We will be logging the frequency of cleaning a sanitation efforts

Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: For retail dining on campus. We plan to have the north coast grill and deli the library cafe fusions and the campus cafe open for the start of fall classes Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: You will see changes made to the furniture arrangements queuing cash sharing and pick up areas to indicate physical distancing. We will also be encouraging you to use an electronic pre order and payment system that we will be rolling out Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: In our residence halls in the dining halls, similar to what you might have experienced in the spring we will again be using an electronic sign up an order system for takeout meals to manage our throughput Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: And we are happy to be able to supplement takeout meals within house dining to the capacity allowed and we will be managing and how seating through an electronic signup system as well Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: As usual, students will be allowed to utilize any of the three dining halls and you can look forward to extended dinner service hours at Wadsworth Hall serving until 7:30pm Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: And then for student organizations catering services will be available offering a limited menu and will be bound by the occupancy limits of any space on campus catering staff will be available to consult with students to meet their needs Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Lastly, I’m going to share some information about student employment Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: We have to acknowledge that Student Employment is an important element of a student’s campus experience and their ability to pay for their education and living expenses Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: As a recap of Student Employment from the spring semester you may not know that the university quickly stood up a temporary employment program called the Husky worker ready program, which helped Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Which was in place for about three months in the spring semester husky worker ready helped approximately 55 students continue working during the stay at home, stay safe order and pay it out about $75,000 in student wages Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: On campus Student Employment looks promising for the fall with many universities services reopening Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Students who are planning to return to an on campus position should be in touch with their supervisor about what the role will look like for the fall and whether or not the position will be virtual or in person Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: If you’re looking for Campus employment, the best source for student employment information is handshake Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Which contains listings for open on campus and work study jobs as well as those available at local businesses Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: You can navigate to handshake on the Career Services website. And if you don’t see what you’re looking for. Now please check back closer to the start of the school year, as many positions are not posted until closer to the startup, the fall semester Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Once the semester starts Career Services will be hosting a virtual on campus jobs Expo to help students learn about open job opportunities on campus Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: If you are a student employee and have a concern about performing your job duties Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Accommodations will be provided for employees identified by the CDC as being at higher risk of Seville severe illness from coven 19 and those who are caring for someone at risk as requested Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Student employees can request a covert 19 high risk accommodation or an accommodation for any other reasons such as being medically unable to wear a face covering by contacting the Michigan Tech ADA coordinator Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: At this time I’d like to hand the conversation over to Joe Cooper, director of financial aid Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Thanks, Teresa. I want to begin by emphasizing that are financially department is here to help for any questions and concerns that you may have during these times Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: We are here to help. And our contact info is on the screen there Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: So first I want to talk a little bit about the funds that were allocated to Michigan Tech from the federal cares act as I know many of you have had questions about this and I’ve actually talked to many of you about this as well. Over the last few weeks Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: So approximately $4.6 million was allocated to Michigan Tech from the federal care sector now $2.3 million dollars at this or half of it was designated to help offset the additional expenses and the loss of revenue that Michigan Tech incurred as a result of Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: With this funding as well as the other proactive measures that President co back and his team Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: putting in place the goal has really been to avoid passing on additional covert related expenses to the students to you Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: The other half of that funding the $2.3 million is required by the federal government to be dispersed directly to you the students as emergency grants Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Specifically this does need to be related to expenses due to the disruption of campus operations as a result of covert 19

Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Now the federal government has their own specific criteria for how a student is deemed eligible for these funds and it’s important to know Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: That that criteria that guidance has been continually evolving ever since the carousel was first announced and that’s something that Michigan Tech Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: My office, President codecs office. We’ve all been monitoring that very closely throughout this whole time to make sure that we’re compliant with the US Department of Education and their regulations that they put forth Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: As of today, I’m happy to say that we’ve been able to distribute $350 emergency campus disruption and technology grants to more than 4000 students Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: That are eligible, many of you have actually likely already received these funds just within the last day or two. If you have direct deposit setup Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: In addition to this emergency grant. I do want to talk about a couple other resources that are important to note Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: You may remember back in March when Dean Bonnie Gorman emailed you back at the end of the month, and she included some additional resources in that email that I think are really important Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: And that many of you already did take advantage of. And we’re glad those were there. The Betty chavis emergency fund the international student Emergency Assistance Fund and the newly created husky Emergency Assistance Fund Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Are all forms of EMERGENCY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE that students can apply for through the Dean of Students website Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Also, I do want to note that, you know, you can always contact our office and financial aid by sending us an email Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: To inquire about a special circumstances review if your family’s income has drastically changed since submitting your FAFSA your Free Application for Federal Student Aid Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: A few quick reminders about that FAFSA. It’s not too late to submit that first of all Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: You still have time to complete that up until and even after the start of the school year. It’s a great way to maximize the amount of financially that you could be eligible for Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Also, if you are selected for verification documents Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Definitely try to get those to us as soon as you can. We want to make sure all your aid is finalized before you get to Michigan Tech and before classes start if you’re not sure about that. You can go to your mind Michigan Tech page and click on the financially tab Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: And then also if you’re considering taking out student loans, whether that be federal or private or alternative loans, try to have those confirmed and completed by August one, just so we can make sure that we get those and have everything in place by the time school starts Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Otherwise, I just really want to emphasize that, you know, we understand that you probably have a lot of questions. As a result, Copa 19 situation and we’re very much here to help as a resource. So please don’t hesitate to contact us Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: That being said, I’d like to turn it over to stare sheltie our general counsel who is Larkin mentioned earlier has been working really hard to get us this complete return to campus plan with a pretty comprehensive team Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Thank you. I appreciate that Joe and to everybody else who’s spoken today. This really has been a team effort Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: doing all the work that’s been going on this summer to get all of you back to campus in the fall and to keep you here safely throughout the fall semester Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: In addition to the people speaking here today. There’s been some really key players in this effort. Kelly cam, who is an associate professor and kip and an epidemiologist Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Has been working really hard on our testing program and our contact tracing program Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Doctors actually young and upper Great Lakes has been an instrumental partner for helping us do this planning and the testing program that we’re going to be partnering with them on Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And everyone at the Western up health department has been involved in this process. And it’s been really integral Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: In our planning. So our thanks to them. And we’re all working really hard to get you back here when you return to campus. This is new, right, these health and safety levels are how we are going to be approaching Kobe Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So the health and safety levels were developed really to maximize your educational experience on campus, while allowing the flexibility to respond in real time to what’s going on with coded Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: I think we have all learned that the situation with Kobe rapidly changes that now that we’re in July, we don’t know exactly what the situation will look like in August or September or October or November Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So making decisions. Now that our absolute for that period of time probably doesn’t make that much sense. So this health and safety level plan allows us the flexibility to respond in real time and take appropriate action as it is determined Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: You’ll see that, you know, level one is kind of the least restrictive level they ramp up to level five that is the most restrictive level Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: We expect to be bringing you back at level three absent things changing which they always could, but we expect to be bringing you back at level three Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Level three involved. This involves this mixed modality instruction that you’ve heard talked about today. So that’s a mix of face to face and remote instruction for most of you, some online instruction Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Face coverings. As you’ve heard, will be required indoors and outdoors were six foot distancing cannot be maintained. That’s also true at level two and level four, so really plan on face coverings

Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Everyone coming to campus that students that’s employees all the faculty all the staff and visitors will be asked to do daily symptom monitoring while we’re at level three Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: That’s something that we’re going to ask you to get a custom to we’ve all been working to get accustomed to it over the past several weeks for getting better at it. We know it takes a little adjustment Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: But it does really help keeping our campus safe and that’s very important. We will have a significant asymptomatic testing program Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So I want to talk to you just a little bit about that. So we have not had a large number of cases up here in home county Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: They have been increasing slowly but really compared to the rest of the state and the rest of the area. We are very low Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: We recognize that there is a likelihood of people coming to our campus, bringing the virus to this area, it is essential that we catch the majority of those as early as possible Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So we are asking you, when you come to campus to join in our voluntary testing program Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: I can tell you, we are not using the very uncomfortable tests that some of you may have had or some of you may have heard about the test that we are using with our healthcare partner is not that bad Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And that’s what the students tell me who’ve done it so far. So Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: There’s that important fact. And although we’re not requiring it because we do believe very, very strongly here at Michigan Tech in Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: personal choice. We also believe very strongly in individual responsibility. So we’re asking you to join us in this effort so that as we bring everyone back to campus. We can get a strong baseline reading on the prevalence of Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Among our population and then we are going to have additional periodic samples Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: throughout the remainder of the fall semester. And if we ask you to do that. Asymptomatic testing. We’re hoping that you’ll take us up on that Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And help us ensure that we are getting the numbers that the epidemiologists need to see to truly understand the health of our community. That’s what will allow us to move among these levels and to move down to level to a less restrictive level if that becomes appropriate Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Or if we have to if we find that we have a larger number of cases, then we’re anticipating or Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Perhaps at the coven 19 virus becomes worse overall in the state. We may need to move up to level four and make those adjustments, where we might see some more restrictions on common spaces or restrictions on visitors. We’re obviously rather go towards level two Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Um, Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: You know, we know Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: We know that this is a shift for you Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: We know that we have a solid plan in place and we think we have the best plan in place for addressing this and really it hinges on your participation it hinges on you doing your part Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Wearing your face coverings washing your hands, doing your daily symptom tracking. If you do develop symptoms Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Reporting those entering the system and the process that we have in place to keep you and everyone else as health healthy and safe as possible Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So we’re asking for your cooperation and that we have the support measures in place to help you get through this. We have our isolation spaces set aside Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And we have the capacity to deal with this safely. So although we can’t guarantee any results that we do think we have a very solid plan in place and we are really looking forward to your return Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: With that, I’m going to pass this back to Larkin, and she’s going to moderate our Q AMP a session to answer some of the questions I know have been rolling in throughout our presentation today. Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Great, thank you all like Sarah said at this time, we’d like to open the session to your questions, several of you have submitted questions in advance. So we’ll get started with those if you do have a question, please use the Q AMP a feature on zoom Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: We will do our best to get through as many questions as possible during the remainder of the hour Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This first question will be directed to jack Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: When we have notification on which classes are affected by remote online or online instruction and which classes are in person Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Right. Thanks. Larkin, so if you go out and check your schedule. You can see what is happening in real time Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So as the campus went through the process of reducing occupancy and rooms to correspond to that six foot physical distancing constraint Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We work from the largest classes down towards the smaller classes. So if you were in a large class A 500 person class that was planned for Fisher 135 your class might have been one of the first ones that was moved to remote Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Instruction or changed into a variety of sections and you can see those things by going out right now. Checking your course schedule Jackie Huntoon, Provost: If you have concerns or questions. The first place to go is to your academic advisor in your department Jackie Huntoon, Provost: The second place to go is your department chair. To find out more information and you if you have questions about it

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So as we go through this whole process things have pretty much settled, they’re pretty much set where they are right now Jackie Huntoon, Provost: There probably will be a few more last minute adjustments between now and the start of fall semester but we’re, we’re pretty good right now so you can go out and check right away Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Jackie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question will be directed to Sarah. What will happen if a student in the dorm pests positive Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So if one of the students in residential housing test positive that student will be moved to one of our isolation spaces Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: On if that student has a roommate that roommate will be the quarantining for up to 14 days and the health department has a key role in all of this and will be cooperating with them Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: We do have support services to ensure that both students in isolation and in quarantine have food and other essential service items delivered to them Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: In addition, there will be contact tracing run both through the health department and through Michigan Tech to ensure that others Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Who have been in close contact with a positive case are important to that so that they can likewise quarantine Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And depending on where the student has been what their interactions have been there may be some additional notifications made as well. So that’s handled on an individual case by case basis. But that’s an overall summary of what happens Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. Our next question will go to Teresa how lecture halls, such as Fisher 135 be adapted to meet the new spatial requirements Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Okay, so our engineering group and facilities management went through all of our instructional spaces and assess them for the new capacity Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: To allow for this six foot distancing given the room size and the furniture configuration. So it was a room by room assessment and this information was then used by the registrar’s office to determine what classes were assigned to what spaces Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Following up to the explanation that Jackie gave about which horses were moved to online or broken out into different sections and moving from largest to smallest Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Next question. Go to President codec last spring Michigan Tech provided, room and board refunds for unused portions of the semester Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Are you planning to do the same thing if we are forced to go to remote instruction again. In addition, can you speak to the status of tuition for classes that are delivered online, please Richard Koubek: To learn first we hope we don’t end up in that situation again, but I believe that you saw that we have plans in case we in case we do Richard Koubek: And just as last spring. If we get in that situation there would be refunds for services that we are unable to render to you, such as how seen in the experience tech fee Richard Koubek: She also heard from Jackie. There’s a number of variables that are coming into play with regard to the mode. The course is going to be delivered, and we do not have plans for differential tuition as a function of delivery mode Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. The next question will be going to Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: If all classes end up being changed to remote or online will students be allowed to get out of the housing contracts for the first semester or all year Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Well as Sarah indicated earlier, this is a really rapidly changing situation. And I think we would make our decisions in real time in the time frame that makes the most sense. And so at this point, I would say that we’d be making our decisions for the fall semester only Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Our next question is going to be directed to Joe Cooper Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: In the event of having a full online semester can Michigan Tech ensure students are not penalized for their scholarships, if they choose to take a gap semester Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: That’s a good question. So in general, we’re not looking to penalize any students. I will say financially can often be complex. And so I would recommend if students have that concern or thinking about that, which I know is a very personal decision Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: For students to make if they’re considering that contact the financial aid office to talk about you know what effects would there be Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: I can usually ensure that your Michigan Tech scholarships would be okay. But there may be certain things we have to look at with other scholarships letter B from federal or state sources. So please don’t hesitate to contact us and we’ll take a look at that Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. This next question will be directed to Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Will there be any task forces to help off campus students if they can track the virus, for example, will there be a good service food service for off campus students if they have coven 19 and are unable to go to local stores

Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: That’s a good question. We do not have task forces set up to support off campus students in that way Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Some of you might not realize that like some of the businesses in town now have curbside Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: pickup. So if you have a friend. Perhaps you could pick up groceries for you. That would be one possibility. And then they could leave it outside your door Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: If that isn’t feasible, you can contact the Dean of Students Office and we’ll find some support and find some help for you. I do know also that the staff at the food pantry is talking about offering delivery. So that’s another option that will be exploring Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Great, thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Jackie, how will physical education courses run for the next year so that students can still meet general education requirements Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Thank you. Larkin, so the Student Development complex, for example, has been working over the summer to put in place all the safety protocols that have been Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Subscribed by the state for gyms and most of the courses are ready to go. There are a few that there’s still some bugs being worked out. So the plan right now is to offer a full set of physical education courses Jackie Huntoon, Provost: That will be available like usual to all students. And as we move into winter, of course, the number of winter related opportunities increases and so they’ll be some new things on the book as we start getting snow. Thanks Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: I’ll direct this mess. Next question to Sarah, how will contact tracing be accomplished Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So some of the details are still being worked on at the state level regarding this, but this is what we know the Western up health department is our local health department Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And when there is a positive case, they will do a direct interview with the individual who is positive. They also contact the close contacts of that individual to ensure that they are moved into quarantine Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Depending on whether or not the individual has been on our campus. We are more or less involved in that process. And we do have some employees working from home and some students who Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: May be in the area, but not on campus. So the process is a little bit different. There Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: If we do have people who are in specific areas on campus with other people with likely exposures. There are some additional notifications that happened in those areas as well Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So it is a case by case basis. We have some special software programming that we are working on for our contact tracing. We’re also very closely connected with the Western up health department and talking to them very regularly regarding contact tracing and other issues Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Great, thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: One more question for Teresa, will the shuttle around town be available. And as often as it was last year and will it still be a shared service with people in the community or just for Tech students Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Right so transportation is important right now for the fall. The university is planning to again contract with the city opponent Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: For student ridership on a commuter shuttle and that is a blended service that includes community members Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: We’re also planning to continue our campus circulation shuttle and a shopping shuttle for the fall and those are Michigan Tech Community specific routes Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: For all of our shuttle services physical distancing will be part of the ridership experience and additional cleaning measures will be taken and we have been continuing to operate our shopping shuttle this summer with those elements in place and it has been successful Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. We will now move to questions that were submitted in our session today. The first one will go to Bonnie. What is the outlook for clubs and organizations on campus Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: We expect the student organizations to function as normal. You know, we will be giving them and sharing with them. The guidelines as in terms of how to do that, but we expect that they will be able to operate Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. I’ll be directing this next question to Jackie, how will faculty enforce facemask wearing Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Right, so I think everyone has to recognize that this is a really stressful time in the history of mankind, certainly none of us have been through a global pandemic before in our lives

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So given that, and and given the need to function as a community that looks after one another. The first step is also to just ask for compliance. That’s the easiest thing to do Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And Michigan Tech students, staff and faculty are great about trying to help one another out Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So most of the time when you ask someone to do something that is for your own safety or the safety of others who are in the vicinity, who might be at risk, you get compliance Jackie Huntoon, Provost: However, if someone say in a classroom does not comply. For example, if a student refuses to wear a face covering and Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Even after being asked, then the faculty member has every right to ask that students will leave the classroom because it’s important to remember that Jackie Huntoon, Provost: They then are putting all the other students in the room at some risk. So the next step is to ask the person to leave Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And if the students should in fact refused to leave the classroom, then the faculty member has the right to end the class period Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So again, the ultimate goal here is protecting safety if we protect safety we can all come back together and have this face to face learning experience Jackie Huntoon, Provost: To the maximum standard possible. But if we let go of safety we lose everything else. So it really has to be the most important thing. Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. This next question will be going to Teresa Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: guidelines say that there should be 50 people at maximum in a room, but you mentioned that Fisher 135 can hold 47 people Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: How did the 50 people maximum guideline come into play when considering Michigan text room sizes Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Right, so that maximum number only applies if that amount could be achieved, while maintaining six foot physical distancing. So the approach that we took was to go through every space and identify what our Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Capacities would be using that six foot physical distancing Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Jackie. This next question is for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Some students have far more difficulty with learning remotely or online than they do in a normal classroom setting Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What do you propose to make their learning experience easier Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Right. That’s a really good point. It’s not the same to remove to learn remotely or online Jackie Huntoon, Provost: When we talk to students and faculty after spring semester, the biggest issues that both students and faculty identified Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Were either unfamiliarity with the technology or the inability to say get good Internet access or have dedicated space and time to do the work that they needed and so Jackie Huntoon, Provost: If we’re all back at the same place, or if we all have our own device so that we can have dedicated access to the course that overcomes one big hurdle Jackie Huntoon, Provost: In addition, education is a science and we have a Center for Teaching and Learning here on our campus Jackie Huntoon, Provost: The staff members of that center have been working with faculty over the summer, who had some specific challenges Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Often they’re working one on one with those faculty to figure out how to do a better job of meeting the needs of a diverse student population Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And so I think we’ve all learned a lot over the summer. I’ve had some emails that have been shared with me from department chairs Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Of faculty who took the training over the summer who basically came back, saying, I had no idea how much I didn’t know until I started to learn more about how to do education Jackie Huntoon, Provost: In a 21st century environment which necessarily involves the use of technology. So, you know, we’re an institution of higher education. We value learning Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And we’re learning what went well, what didn’t went well didn’t go well and doing things to overcome any shortcomings, we saw in the spring and will continue to do the same thing as we move into the fall Thank you Jackie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Joe Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: financial situations have changed a lot. Due to covert 19 Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Who do we direct getting a review of our financial aid package to Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Good question. And we understand that a lot of folks may be experiencing this you can send an email to [email protected] Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: And the subject line you can put special circumstances or special review Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: And tell us a little bit about what’s going on. And there’s a kind of a strict process. We have to follow that the federal government steps in place Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: In order to review your expected family contribution that set by the federal government. But by doing this process, it would allow us to see if you may be able to be considered for additional eight opportunities

Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Joe. I’ll be directing this next question to Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What is the cost for the asymptomatic testing program, especially for uninsured or underinsured individuals Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: There is no cost to anyone obtaining a test for covert 19 in the state of Michigan. And that’s true for any testing through our university as well Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Jackie. A question for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Will there be a possibility to limit the amount of back and forth to and from school related breaks specifically around not returning potentially after Thanksgiving break but finishing remotely Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Right. So again, you know, as I said in my first remarks. There’s a lot of uncertainty surrounding the fall semester we don’t know exactly what’s going to happen Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We have very few cases in Houghton county right now. I think in the entire county. When I looked yesterday there were 24 positive cases and three probable cases. So, on the order of 30 very low. That’s great Jackie Huntoon, Provost: It’s possible that will grow in the future. We don’t know if that’s going to happen. It could happen. Should that happen or if there are other things going on that we can’t even conceive of right now Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We do have the opportunity to do many things. For example, we could completely cancel that mid semester break in October Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And just tell students we’re going to continue classes or there’ll be some other activities and we don’t want you to leave. Similarly, it’s possible we could cancel Thanksgiving break and ask students to stay Jackie Huntoon, Provost: The outcome of both of those actions would be we would finish fall semester, a little bit early, and send everyone home for the winter break a little bit earlier, maybe a week earlier than planned Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We also know that things could get that right. And so if they do get bad we have the opportunity to break with a face to face instruction at that October break Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And send students home if they need to go home and then resume classes with very little interruption to the learning opportunities Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And again at Thanksgiving, if things look bad at Thanksgiving. We have the opportunity to move to remote instruction fully remote instruction Jackie Huntoon, Provost: At that time, so we’ve really tried to think about fall semester Jackie Huntoon, Provost: In a series of chunks and we can respond to what’s happening on the ground and around the planet in real time as we enter any of those breakpoints Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And because of the rapidity at which circumstances are changing throughout this coven 19 pandemic. We really need to maintain as much flexibility as we can so that we respond appropriately. At the time, we need to respond Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So that’s it Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Sarah, do we have to be coven 19 tested to return to campus Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: No in fact what our epidemiologists, and doctors are telling us is that there’s not much value in getting a test before you get to the area, what we would rather you do Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Is um how test when you arrived here as part of our testing program that will do a better job of letting us know if you’re infected at the time, and we’ll be able to address that right away Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: If you are tested before you come, there’s always a chance that you will be infected. After that test is taken, or that your viral load will increase. After that test is taken, you’ll still be infectious. When you arrive here and you wouldn’t know it Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Jackie is the pass fail system still in place for the fall 2020 semester Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Question. So, at present, it is not. Um, that’s one of those things that could change we made that change during spring semester as a result of moving to remote instruction with zero warning. So it’s not out of the question. That would be there, but it’s not in place right now Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. A question for Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What is your recommendation if a student is considered a high risk individual, but will be living off campus, should they make arrangements to stay at home or should they still return Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: I think that individuals probably going to need to make a personal decision, given their health circumstances they should also contact Student Disability Services Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: To make arrangements to study remotely if they want to be in hotan but stay in their apartment. If they feel like that’s an option that they would want to explore. They could certainly do that

Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next questions for Jackie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What will fall camp in Alberta look like Jackie Huntoon, Provost: That’s a great question and I saw that one coming up a few times. So at this time it’s plan to be face to face Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And I heard today from Dr. Andrew store, who’s the Dean of the College of forest Resources and Environmental Sciences that he will be doing a town hall like this one Jackie Huntoon, Provost: To talk about fall camp and other aspects of the college’s instruction probably next week, so please look for probably an email announcement coming out from the College Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And then attend that town hall to find out or so they’re planning all the same sorts of distancing and housing capabilities as well. He have here on main campus and he’ll have all the details Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Teresa. This question is for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: How will the changes to even the residence halls affect people who live off campus study in the residence halls, for example, people with top dog Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Right on. So, it is our plan to accommodate anyone who has a meal plan so top dog is one of our meal plans they should be able to either do dine in or take out Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: As, as with anyone else who has a plan, they will be accommodated Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: For Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Could you please explain more about the isolation plan for students in residence halls will quarantine be in place with the roommate or will students be asked to move and are you following the CDC is 10 day guideline for this Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So if you have a positive coven 19 test you individually, who have that test will move to isolation Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: The roommate or roommates of that individual person would then be placed in quarantine. Those are Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Both in line with CDC guidance Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Moving out of isolation and moving out of quarantine, are both health department decisions Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So right now, our health department is following all CDC guidelines. When you move out of isolation depends on a variety of factors, including your personal symptoms Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So there may be a follow up test to determine when it’s appropriate to move out of isolation or you may timeout depending on which CDC Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Strategy, they are following at that point in time, which will be dependent often on your symptoms. If you are in quarantine right now. CDC guidance, which our local health department is following Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Is that you would be quarantined for 14 days if you are remain symptom free, then you are out of quarantine, at the end of those 14 days if you develop symptoms Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And then we would ask you to get a test. And if you choose to get a test, you would either move to isolation of positive or follow different guidelines, that’s, that’s negative. So that’s the process and it does follow all of the current CDC guidance Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What concessions, if any, will be provided to students who test positive or need to self quarantine due to someone close to them being positive Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: To help them academically and to avoid falling behind, or not being able to meet all course requirements Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Great question. So our hope is that students who excuse me do test positive do test positive Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Are not so sick that they won’t be able to continue their classes remotely. That’s really the beauty of the work that the faculty has done is that students will be able to have opportunities to continue their work Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: both online and remotely. If a student is sick. And that’s not possible. They would be given an equivalent to an excuse to absence. And then what happens in normal circumstances, is that a student and the faculty member work together to give a student, the opportunity to make up Miss work Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Sarah. What is the difference between isolation and quarantine Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Sure. And this is a common question so isolation is what someone is in if they have had a positive test or if they’re what’s called by the health department of presumptive positive Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: At quarantine is what close contacts of a positive person are put in and quarantine is generally those close contacts are people who have been closer than six feet for 15 minutes or more

Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And when you’re in quarantine you are avoiding contact with the outside world, but you do not necessarily have coated Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Honey. This next question is for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What about students with a DD or ADHD, OCD anxiety and other mental illnesses that will affect their performance with online learning. Are there going to be any accommodations made for them and specific to their needs Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Certainly again students in those situations would work with Student Disability Services to determine what kind of accommodation is most appropriate for their disability Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Jackie. This question will be directed to you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: What monitoring is Michigan Tech doing for quality instruction Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Right, so the Senate. The University Senate has a policy regarding the quality of instruction and 50% of that measure of any individual instructors Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Quality has to come from some source other than student evaluation of instruction. So students do fill out a form give feedback to their instructors after every course. But in addition, faculty members are going through other Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Types of it’s not really review, but it’s more professional learning environment for faculty that are working together to help each other, improve Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So it might be, they work with a colleague to have the colleague come in and watch them teach a particular lesson or series of lessons and then give them feedback about how they might make it more effective Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Or they might invite a member of our Center for Teaching and Learning to come in Jackie Huntoon, Provost: We do engage directly with faculty. Not me personally, but usually the department chair will engage directly with faculty who seem to be struggling Jackie Huntoon, Provost: And we find out about faculty who are struggling, either from their students who report to the department chair that there seems to be a problem Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Or through those surveys that are distributed to students at the end of each semester. So when a faculty member receives a number of Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Fairly low ratings from students in their course what my office does is an ass. The Center for Teaching and Learning to reach out to those faculty members Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Or have the faculty members reach out to others and come up with a plan for improvement. So those plans for improvement are submitted either to the center Jackie Huntoon, Provost: For teaching and learning or to my office we track, we make sure that in every semester, all of those are addressed and then why we monitor things as time goes on. And so, you know, the obvious question is, does this actually result in improvements. And the answer is yes, it does Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Jackie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Our parents or guests allowed on campus for moving of new students into the dorms Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Great question. Yes, we are asking families to limit the number of people that come with their students to to Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: And then as Sarah mentioned those visitors will also be asked to do the guest symptom monitoring and that that will be available to them several hours before they come to campus Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Will there be parameters for face coverings such as windshields in her face shields, excuse me, in lieu of masks Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So generally, we are asking individuals to wear face coverings if they are not able to medically tolerate a face covering accommodations are available for that in some cases, that may be a face shield Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And it may be a different accommodation as well. So if you’re in a situation where you’re not medically able to tolerate a face covering which could be a face mask. It could be a buff pulled over the face Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And reach out to students. Disability Services and see if an accommodation might be more appropriate for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Jackie. This next question is for you. Well, the learning centers be open this fall, and if so, how will they operate Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So the learning centers will be open this fall, and they will probably be open by appointment in most cases to a smaller number of students that won’t be just

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Walk in necessarily you may need to make an appointment so that we don’t have crowding in those facilities and also during spring semester, the learning centers continue to operate so they can also use remote technology like we’re doing right here if needed to meet with students Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, honey. This next questions for you. Is there a limit to the number of students allowed in a dorm room specifically regarding guests and will this be monitored Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Yes, so we have said that the number of guests cannot exceed the number of people in the room. So you could have two two guests in your room at a time Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: I can say that there are going to be people going around and knocking on every door to say how many people are in this room Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: But we do have staff that does rounds on a regular basis. And I think if they noticed that there were more than people in a room than should be, they would address that Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next questions for Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Can you please talk about how you’re communicating with the local health care providers and the health department Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So my answer to this would depend a little bit on what about um so we can be in very regular communication with the local health department Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Regarding active cases in the area. If there are any positive cases tied to us how they feel about the protocols that we are drafting up and proposing to put in place Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And we’re talking to them about state guidance regarding communications between local universities and health departments Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And we have a close relationship they are. We are in regular phone zoom text contact with individuals. They’re the same is true with local health care providers Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: I know Dr. Koh back has talking has spoken with the local health care providers within the last week, we also have very regular contact Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: With upper Great Lakes who we’ve been partnering with has been having a drive through testing clinic on our campus over the summer and we’re working with them Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: On move in testing and baseline testing when everyone comes back to campus. And so that’s also zoom phone calls, text messages and as issues arise Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Great. Thank you, Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Joe Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: For students who cannot afford a personal laptop for their remote or online classes will there be accommodations for them. And what would these be Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: Very good question. So yes, there is the option if you do find yourself in that situation, you can contact financial aid to request a cost of attendance adjustment, something we can look at Joe Cooper, Director of Financial Aid: In most cases this will give you additional student loan eligibility. But again, each case would be looked at individually to see what your situation is Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This question is for Bonnie, how can parents receive more information on this as well as other general student life topics in the future Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Not sure exactly what they mean. President callback does a letter to parents and families on a quarterly basis and covers a variety of different topics Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Like that we do send our committee, we have been sending our communications about co bad to students. But then also, they’ve been forwarded to parents for informational purposes as well. So that’s been happening around co bad and I imagine we’ll continue that until the fall as well Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Thank you Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Sarah. Well, any student who wants a coven 19 test be able to get one Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Yes, absolutely. Tests are available, essentially, on demand right now. And as long as the test supply remains strong which we expect it to anyone can get a tested anytime Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you. And a follow up question to that. Who should be contacted about that Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So there will be there is an empty you flex portal that students will be using this fall. This is where they will be doing their symptom tractor. They’re also be able to report test results there Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: And they’ll also have information there, I believe, on how to access tests. It’s also on the Mt you flex website. If you go to Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: The coven 19 testing, you’ll see testing statistics that are live for our campus community and there’s a button there as well. That, I believe, takes you to local test sites throughout Michigan, including here in the Houston area Thank you

Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Bonnie. This next question is for you. What is happening career surfaces or water a center Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: So both of those offices will be open Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: As normal and following physical distancing guidelines and we’ll be doing coaching, much like Jackie reference for the learning centers Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: In the water center and they right now working hard on orientation and orientation will be a blended mix of in person activities and Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Online and remote activities as well. And the same applies for Career Services. The staff is coming back and are putting together a lot of workshops. Again, the there may be some size Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Constraints when those workshops are offered so there’ll be offering them more often and or there’ll be offering them virtually as well. And the career fair itself, as I mentioned, will be virtual Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: If I’m hypothetically walking around campus or downtown hotel with my roommate, are we expected to socially distance from each other Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: So CDC guidance would say that if you and your roommate are living in the same space you’re considered a family unit and you don’t need to physically six foot distance from people within your same family unit Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: Depending on what you’re doing. You may be expected to physically distance from others, certainly, but you and your roommate living in the same space. Don’t need to distance from each other Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Sarah Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This next question is for Teresa Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Can you please explain the electronic dining sign up and specifically do you have to report to the dining hall at same time every day. And as a follow up question our milk meals able to be delivered to your room in lieu of dining Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: I’m sure. So I’ll start with the second half of the question is we don’t have a plan to deliver meals to student rooms Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Unless they’re in isolation and then we are fully prepared to serve that need the electronic sign up we experimented with that in the spring, and that is to quickly get people through the process of going through the dining hall, so Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: In this for the takeout meals, you’re able to sign up for what you want, approximately when you’re going to pick it up and we’ll have it packaged and ready to go to get you in and out really quickly Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: For the in house dining we’re developing that Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Platform right now and it’s likely that we will have time slots where students could choose to sign up, it would not be necessarily mandatory but it will be the best way for us to manage our in house seating and we would not have a sign up that would Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Would require you to be at the same time every day because we know that schedules are quite variable and students have different activities and responsibilities on different days of the week. So we want to maintain as flex as much flexibility as possible Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Bonnie. This next question will be for you is family weekend so happening in October Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: It is not again the the thinking is, we don’t want to bring people that have potentially been exposed back into the area we are trying to evaluate what kinds of virtual events we might be able to offer students and their families in place of that Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Sarah. This next question will be for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Will students flying out of country on a break, be expected to quarantine upon return Sarah Schulte, General Counsel: We’re following CDC guidance on this right now. CDC guidance is that anyone who is doing international travel quarantine for 14 days upon return to the United States. So right now, the answer to that is yes. If that guidance were to change, we would probably change along with it Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Jackie. This next question is for you. What will final exams look like Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So that’s a really good question. If they’re face to face on campus. They’ll probably look a lot like they have always looked Jackie Huntoon, Provost: If we’re fully remote, they will look a lot more like how they looked at the end of spring semester Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So I’ve been working, actually a lot with our Center for Teaching and learning about tests assessments quizzes and one thing that we have all learned since Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Came into our lives. Is that the way most of us gauge student learning is probably not the most effective way

Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So multiple choice tests are probably not the best way to measure whether or not a student has actually learning the material and can apply it to new situations Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So again, the Center for Teaching and Learning is working with faculty across campus to think about more ways to do different types of assessments Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Many more formative or low stakes assessments that become a learning opportunity on their own and fewer of those high stakes assessments that we’ve all seen so much in the past. So it, it continues to evolve Jackie Huntoon, Provost: For those instructors who do want to continue to use those sort of traditional high stakes assessments. There are ways we can do it either in person having Proctor’s in the room Jackie Huntoon, Provost: Or doing it remotely using technology we use respond as monitor here at Michigan Tech or simply monitoring the courses, they’re taking the test through camera like we can see each other here at least some of us can see each other right now Jackie Huntoon, Provost: So there’s a lot of opportunities available and instructors have a lot of latitude to choose the method that works best for their students in their course. So we’re not prescribing it at the university level Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you Jackie. We have time for a couple more questions. So our next one is for Bonnie, will there be significant restrictions on student organizations in booking rooms on campus for meetings and other events Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Well, I think, again, the space restrictions are going to apply Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Based on capacity and and number of people able to be together Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: The rooms. We know that we have, we’re holding some of the rooms in the mob right now for space should students need a place to do some remote classes Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: While they’re on campus. So that might reduce the amount of available space in the mob during the day I would envision that if student orgs are using classroom space in the evenings for their club meetings and events that those spaces would be available as usual Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Bonnie. Teresa. I have a dual question for you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: The first one, they’re both quite important. But the first one is, will the restrooms that are closed off currently be reopening and the second one is, will the scale open Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Yes. Both of those are very important questions. I agree Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: Very soon, we do have a plan to reopen the restrooms on campus that are currently closed. The reason for that closure is for us to redirect the custodial staffs effort Theresa Coleman-Kaiser, AVP Administration: To other important matters, but we will be reopening those very soon, and our plan right now is to have a really successful ski season this one term Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Great, thank you Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: This will be our last question this afternoon, and it is for Bonnie Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Please tell me, I’ll be able to hear the sweet sounds of the Michigan Tech PEP fan this year Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: Yes, you will. I really want to give a shout out to the pep band because they were one of the first groups that came forward and asked about Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: planning how to run band camp, which they usually do at the end of orientation week in a responsible way so that they could physically distance. They’ve been paying attention to Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: The literature in terms of aerosols and instruments and use of mouthpieces and things like that. We’ve been talking to them, they’re working with the Department. So they may not all be so close together, but I think we’ll still hear their sound Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Thank you, Bonnie. I think we’re all looking forward to hearing the sweet, sweet sounds of pep band Bonnie Gorman, Dean of Students: I agree Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Again, that was the last question. Thank you again for joining us today. As I mentioned at the beginning of the town hall this session has been recorded and will be available on our Michigan Tech flex web page on Monday Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: If you have additional questions, feel free to connect with us using the email address. We will see on the screen shortly Larkin Hooker-Moericke, USG President: Again, thank you so much for joining and we look forward to seeing you on campus soon

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